The New School for Social Research

Faculty A-Z

  • Oz Frankel

    Associate Professor of History

    Office Location:

    80 Fifth Avenue

    Profile:

    I am an Associate Professor of History at the New School for Social Research. I am a proponent of a critical history and view historicization as an instrument for rethinking and reimagining the world against convention and expectation; a mode of discovery, reframing, and estranging that is inherently political. Indeed, politics has been my recurrent subject matter, and “culture” (broadly conceived to include literature, knowledge, science, memory, performance, and communication) my preferred entry point for analysis, critique, and teaching.

    My fields of interest include US history (especially the nineteenth century), American presence abroad, modern British history, knowledge and its transmission, radicalism and its culture, social history, comparative history, history of the state, memory and commemoration, and history of the book. My recently published book “States of Inquiry: Social Investigations and Print Culture in Nineteenth Century Britain and the United States” explores the early roots of the modern informational states. I am now engaged in a transnational study that follows the social, cultural and political relationship between the US and Israel at the turn of the 1970s.  

    Degrees Held:

    PhD 1998, University of California, Berkeley

    Recent Publications:


    “Instructing the Liberal Subject: Facts and Voice in Victorian Blue Books,” History of Universities (2013).

    The Politics of the Radical Analogy: the Case of the Israeli Black Panthers,” in Nico Slate, ed. Black Power Beyond Borders (Palgrave, 2012).

    Hard Facts for Hard Times: Social Knowledge and Crisis in the Nineteenth Century,” Common-Place (2010).

    “The State Between Orality and Textuality: Government Reports as ‘Orature’” in Cultural Narratives: Textuality and Performance in the United States before 1900, ed. Sandra M. Gustafson and Caroline Sloat (Notre Dame University Press, 2009).

    What’s in a Name? The Black Panthers in Israel,” The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture (2008).

    States of Inquiry: Social Investigations and Print Culture in Nineteenth Century Britain and the United States (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006).

    Blue Books and the Victorian Reader,” Victorian Studies (2004).

    The Predicament of Racial Knowledge: Government Studying the Freedmen During the Civil War,” Social Research (Spring 2003).

    Research Interests:

    Social and political history of 19th-century U.S., Victorian Britain, American Empire, race, media and print culture, reform, state formation, and historiography.

     

    Awards And Honors:

    Postdoctoral Scholar in the Michigan Society of Fellows (1998-2001).

    Reinhard Bendix Research Fellowship for Social and Political Thought (1997-98).

    The Allan Sharlin Memorial Award (1997-98).

    John L. Simpson Memorial Research Fellowship in International and Comparative Studies (1997-98).

    Fellow of the Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities, UC Berkeley (1996-97).

    Mabelle McLeod Lewis Memorial Fund Dissertation Fellowship (1996-97).

    International Dissertation Research Fellow of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) - Western Europe Program (1995-96).

    The Smithsonian Institution Predoctoral Fellowship (1994-95).

    Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1994-95).

    Current Courses:

    America's Empires

    Historiography & Hist Practice

    Independent Study (Open Campus)

    Independent Study (Open Campus)

    America's Empires

    Historiography & Hist Practice

    Uses of the Past

    Donald Trump as History

    Independent Study (Open Campus)

    Ind Senior Project (Open Campus)

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