Parsons Paris

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Parsons Paris.

Courses

Pre-College Level

This immersion in the art and design college environment is for high school students entering their junior or senior years, or for recent high school graduates. In all studio courses, students develop portfolio pieces for college admissions applications. Students must be age 16 or older by July 6, 2015, the start of the program. No exceptions will be made. Please see the list below for course descriptions and links to registration.

College and Adult Level

College and adult students who are 18 years of age and have completed at least one year of college or who are 19 years of age or older by June 1, 2015, for Session I or July 6, 2015, for Session II, enroll in this summer program as a complement to a full-time degree program and to gain intensive exposure to design disciplines that help them achieve their academic and professional goals. Students also enroll in this program to build the skills and portfolio necessary for acceptance to graduate programs. Session I is for college and adult participants only. During Session II, pre-college students are also on campus and a limited number of courses combine levels. Please see the list below for course descriptions and links to registration.

College Credit

Students enrolled in the pre-college and college/adult level programs in New York earn three college credits upon successful completion of the program. 

We strongly recommend that participants consult an academic advisor at their home institution for further details of approval, transfer, and fulfillment of graduation requirements.

ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPT REQUEST

Transcripts issued by the Registrar's Office carry the signature and seal of The New School. A transcript is confirmation of a student's permanent record at the university. Students who complete Summer Intensive Studies may request that their transcript(s) be mailed to other colleges and institutions by submitting an official request to the Registrar's Office.

PRE-COLLEGE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Architectural Design Studio
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1201 Section C

Students develop an understanding of the basic vocabulary of architectural design and apply these concepts through individual and collaborative studio projects. They experiment with the architectural design process by investigating scale, space, and systems found in the constructed environment. Technical drawing and 3D model-making techniques are introduced.
Register here.

Design and Management
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1301 Section C

This course provides an overview of topics and issues central to the Strategic Design and Management program, with an emphasis on the relationships between design, experience, and social and economic change. An intensive three-week course, it exposes students to the enormous variety of ways design functions in business contexts and helps them understand the roles designers play in creative industries through critical readings and discussions, case studies, guest lectures, field trips, and collaborative, practice-based projects. By means of research, prototyping, experimentation, self-reflection, and decision-making activities, students learn to become resourceful practitioners and creative entrepreneurs. The intensive nature of the class results in a steep learning curve; the students’ diverse nationalities and backgrounds promote new perspectives; and immersion in the classroom and the city fosters new friendships and experiences. **Revised Course Description. Updated 1/23/15
Register here.

Design Studio
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1115 Section C

If you are interested in learning more about the world of design or are planning to apply to an art and design school, Design Studio is for you. The criteria for admission to many of today’s most competitive art and design schools are changing. Students are now expected to display their work along with careful documentation of the entire design process. It is no longer enough to present a beautiful finished work of art; you must demonstrate how you formulate ideas, make decisions, and solve problems. This course introduces students to Parsons’ design methodology, including research, concept development, sketching and prototyping, iterative project development, and written reflection. Students then apply this process to projects in which they explore disciplines including fashion, product, and graphic design. Students are also introduced to the fundamentals of drawing and are encouraged to experiment with sketching and illustration techniques, using digital tools in Adobe Creative Suite, digital photography, and 3D materials and processes. Project work is supplemented by weekly guest lectures by high-profile New York City designers and recent Parsons graduates and by visits to relevant exhibitions and events in the city. Students must bring a laptop.
Register here.

Drawing Explorations
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1101 Section C

This course combines the fundamental practice of observational drawing with conceptual strategies for constructing the drawn image. Emphasis is placed on drawing as an integral component of the design process. Students gain analytical skills through direct observation of studio setups as well as visits to museums and outdoor spaces throughout New York City. These skills are used to approach drawing as a way of thinking, as a critical tool, and as a means of observation, storytelling, and representation.
Register here.

Drawing: Figure and Meaning
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1102 Section C

This course immerses students in the study of the human figure through drawing projects that investigate both its form and its capacity to carry meaning within various cultural contexts. Anatomy, motion, gesture, and a variety of techniques and media are used to explore the body as the site of messages ranging from the personal to the political.
Register here.

Fashion: Explorations in Sewing and Construction
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1401 Section C

Learn about the process of designing and making, particularly the creation of objects using soft materials. A variety of construction methods are explored, from hand and machine sewing to knitting, crocheting, draping, and patternmaking. Drawing and sketching are introduced as an integral part of the design process, allowing students to develop concepts in two dimensions before they begin making. Transposing visual ideas from sketching to fabricating, 2D to 3D, students are free to explore the techniques of patternmaking or draping to create the structure for their designs. Students familiarize themselves with design process methods through the development of a design sketchbook documenting research, fabric development, sketch inspirations, and reflections. Projects may include but are not limited to clothing and accessories.
Register here.

Fashion: Design Communication
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1402 Section C

Learn how concepts in fashion can be communicated and promoted creatively through styling, photography, graphics, trend spotting, and branding. Students interested in having a voice in the fashion industry—whether through writing, design, blogging, or staging—will learn to create quality content in words and images, in forms including print, TV, film, and social media. We take an in-depth look at the history of fashion images in advertising and contrast the techniques used with current digital platforms and alternative venues for promotion. Students are introduced to various presentation methods that enable them to clearly communicate their ideas both visually and verbally. They are encouraged to work in a range of 2D media, which may include drawing, painting, photography, collage, and the Adobe Creative Suite.
Register here.

Interior Design Studio
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1202 Section C

Students are introduced to the basic vocabulary, skills, and contexts of interior design through a series of small abstract projects. Human scale, movement, circulation, and fundamental form making are explored. Students work both individually and collaboratively in a studio environment to create drawings and 3D models. Note: This is not an interior decoration course. Although decorative elements are considered, the primary focus is on the design process and spatial analysis.
Register here.

Motion Graphics
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1120 Section C

Students explore the fundamentals of time-based graphic motion, with a focus on integrating text with images. They learn how to take their ideas from concept to finished work using a combination of hand drawing techniques and Adobe After Effects. Students also apply basic principles of animation and storytelling to create short sequences as well as longer narrative works.
Register here.

Painting
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1103 Section C

This course focuses on the basics of painting, with an emphasis on technical paint handling, color, composition, and materials. Acquiring basic studio habits and practices, students undertake a visual and conceptual examination of painting today. Individual and group criticism, combined with field trips and discussion, expands perspectives within historical contexts. As students advance, they explore a variety of abstract and figurative possibilities for self-examination.
Register here.

Photography: Analog
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1130 Section C

This course is an introduction to photography as a visual language and teaches students techniques, aesthetics, and theories of photography through a variety of assignments, readings, and lectures. Students work primarily with analog media and darkroom techniques. They are encouraged to experiment with different modes of photography and are required to create a final project based on their own interests. Studio time and class critiques enable students to build a series of images that reflect aesthetic and technical exploration of analog techniques. All work is done in
black and white. Students must have a 35mm film camera with manual settings.
Register here.

Photography: Digital
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1131 Section C

New York City provides visual inspiration for students exploring digital photography. The class investigates the current practices, strategies, and materials used in digital photographic printing. Students refine and expand their image editing, file management, and workflow techniques to produce high-quality prints. They engage in print production, developing the ability to see and talk about color, tone, and material and the quality of the final output. Understanding color management—including color space, post-production methods, and the intersection of light and material—is fundamental to the course.
Register here.

Game Design
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1121 Section C

This course introduces students to principles of game theory and fundamentals of interaction design. Students explore methods for creating analog and digital games by experimenting with a variety of physical objects and digital interfaces. They
develop an understanding of game structure, play experience, and the community aspect of gaming culture. Students are introduced to basic coding, enabling them to create their own games using a range of software and open source programs. Studio work is supplemented by analysis of existing games, guest lectures by game designers, and peer-to-peer play testing.
Register here.

Graphic Design
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1110 Section C

Graphic design is the visual language of everyday life, used in everything from magazine ads to film titles to product packaging. In this course, students are introduced to the fundamentals of visual research, composition, typography, and the organization of information. A key goal for all students is learning to develop powerful concepts. Students address a series of design problems through concept-driven solutions that explore 2D and digital making. The role of typography in design is explored in depth, with an emphasis on the selection of the most appropriate typeface for each project. Students are introduced to digital tools, including the Adobe Creative Suite.
Register here.

Illustration: Beyond the Page
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1106 Section C

This class explores the ever-expanding territory where illustration meets design. The hybrid designer-illustrator is head and shoulders above the pack, possessing drawing skills; a keen sense of color, typography, and layout; and an interest in doing it all. Today’s new breed is poised for long and varied careers. Guest speakers who exemplify these qualities present case studies; slide show lectures provide inspiration; and practical assignments afford students opportunities to produce portfolio work. Assignments include a range of packaging, objects, logos, animation boards, and advertising, all created using a multidisciplinary approach.
Register here.

Printmaking
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1116 Section C

This course introduces students to a range of printmaking processes. Students explore graphics, color theory, drawing, design, and composition. They create portfolio-quality prints using professional techniques in a range of assignments, both representational and conceptual. The class covers etching, drypoint, and monotype as well as less conventional techniques.
Register here.

Products and Things
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1203 Section C

In this introductory course, students engage in hands-on exploration of object design. The product design process is explored through problem solving, integration of essential skills such as drawing and rendering, and iterative prototyping of three-dimensional forms. Students learn to identify where and how design can be best applied. They work both individually and collaboratively in a studio environment to create prototypes for utilitarian products and a project book documenting their research and process.
Register here.

Silkscreen
Pre-College
(July 6–24)
PNNY 1117 Section C

This course explores the use of various screen-printing techniques, emphasizing compositional as well as technical skills for diverse applications. Projects are geared to the needs and interests of the individual student. All basic methods are demonstrated, including the use of handmade and computer-generated stencils. These techniques can be employed in areas such as fashion design, graphic design, and photography.
Register here.

COLLEGE/ADULT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Architectural Design: Digital and Physical Model Making
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2205 Section A

Today’s architect must have experience with digital and physical making as well as the language to work between both spaces. Digital modeling has evolved to become more than just another design tool. It is a device for enabling innovative project development. While there is a new focus on digital technology, physical model making also continues to be a crucial component of design. It has become increasingly reliant on a hybrid of hand fabrication and digital outputting, often combining processes to mimic the construction process. This course is designed to help students develop these model-making skills. It offers students a collaborative environment in which they can work together constructing architectural models.
Register here.

Design and Management
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2301 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2301 Section B

This course provides an overview of topics and issues central to the Strategic Design and Management program, with an emphasis on the relationships between design, experience, and social and economic change. An intensive three-week course, it exposes students to the enormous variety of ways design functions in business contexts and helps them understand the roles designers play in creative industries through critical readings and discussions, case studies, guest lectures, field trips, and collaborative, practice-based projects. By means of research, prototyping, experimentation, self-reflection, and decision-making activities, students become resourceful practitioners and creative entrepreneurs. The intensive nature of the class results in a steep learning curve; the students’ diverse nationalities and backgrounds promote new perspectives; and the immersion in the classroom and the city fosters new friendships and experiences.

**Revised Course Description. Updated 1/23/15
Register here.

Design and Management: Business Models and Entrepreneurial Strategies
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2302 Section B

In this three-week studio course, which builds on Strategic Design and Management I, students and faculty work on a client-based project, developing innovative concepts and tackling challenges involving design and business. The class is ideal for professionals investigating new careers and opportunities, recent graduates wanting to acquire experience and build a portfolio, and students seeking an intensive work-study experience in New York City. Interacting with New York City local entrepreneurs and working in teams on real projects, with specific deadlines and deliverables, they apply the lessons of design research and process to analyze business ventures and propose strategies, culminating in a formal client presentation. Project work is supplemented by regular field trips, studio visits, and guest lectures. Prerequisite: Strategic Design and Management I or similar coursework (such as courses in Parsons’ BBA program) or equivalent professional experience. Registered students should send a CV or résumé and a paragraph about their previous experience in an email with the subject line “Strategic Design and Management II Applicant” to summer@newschool.edu upon course registration.

**Revised Course Description. Updated 1/23/15
Register here.

Design Process
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2111 Section A

In this course, students explore the design process and the fundamental visual principles integral to all fields of design. They learn how to conduct design research, produce a series of concepts, execute a final project, and present their work professionally. The focus is on building skills in handmaking, and project outcomes can take the form of graphic design, typography, photography, bookbinding, and 3D design. Design history is explored through research inspired by the project assignments.
Register here.

Drawing: Figure and Meaning
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2102 Section B

This course immerses students in the study of the human figure through drawing projects that investigate both its form and its capacity to carry meaning within various cultural contexts. Anatomy, motion, gesture, and a variety of techniques and media are used to explore the body as the site of messages ranging from the personal to the political.
Register here.

Fashion: Explorations in Sewing and Construction
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2401 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2401 Section B

Learn about the process of designing and making, particularly the creation of objects using soft materials. A variety of construction methods are explored, from hand and machine sewing to knitting, crocheting, draping, and patternmaking. Drawing and sketching are introduced as an integral part of the design process, allowing students to develop concepts in two dimensions before they begin making. Transposing visual ideas from sketching to fabricating, 2D to 3D, students are free to explore the techniques of patternmaking or draping to create the structure for their designs. Students familiarize themselves with design process methods through the development of a design sketchbook documenting research, fabric development, sketch inspirations, and reflections. Projects may include but are not limited to clothing and accessories.
Register here.

Fashion: Design Communication
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2402 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2402 Section B

Learn how concepts in fashion can be communicated and promoted creatively through styling, photography, graphics, trend spotting, and branding. Students interested in having a voice in the fashion industry—whether through writing, design, blogging, or staging—will learn to create quality content in words and images, in forms including print, TV, film, and social media. We take an in-depth look at the history of fashion images in advertising and contrast the techniques used with current digital platforms and alternative venues for promotion. Students are introduced to various presentation methods that enable them to clearly communicate their ideas both visually and verbally. They are encouraged to work in a range of 2D media, which may include drawing, painting, photography, collage, and the Adobe Creative Suite.
Register here.

Fashion: Merchandising
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2405 Section A

This course is an immersive introduction to the fashion industry and the role of the merchandiser in a fashion apparel company. The course reviews merchandising principles and techniques used, including product development, planning, editing, sourcing, and decision making. Students also acquire a working vocabulary of industry terminology. The course offers a New York perspective: We explore the relationships between design, production, and marketing through an overview of the traditional New York Garment Center. We also examine the fashion incubators recently developed for area fashion designers and craftspeople.
Register here.

Motion Graphics
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2120 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2120 Section B

Students explore the fundamentals of time-based graphic motion, with a focus on integrating text with images. They learn how to take their ideas from concept to finished work using a combination of hand drawing techniques and Adobe After Effects. Students also apply basic principles of animation and storytelling to create short sequences as well as longer narrative works.
Register here.

Industrial and Product Design: Digital and Physical Model Making
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2206 Section A

Today’s product designer must have experience with digital and physical making as well as the language to work between both spaces. Digital modeling has evolved to become more than just another design tool. It is a device for enabling innovative project development. While there is a new focus on digital technology, physical model making also continues to be a crucial component of design. It has become
increasingly reliant on a hybrid of hand fabrication and digital outputting, often combining processes to mimic the construction process. This course is designed to help students develop these model-making skills. It offers students a collaborative environment in which they can work together on industrial and product design projects. Students are required to bring a laptop.
Register here.

Painting
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2103 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2103 Section B

This course focuses on the basics of painting, with an emphasis on technical paint handling, color, composition, and materials. Acquiring basic studio habits and practices, students undertake a visual and conceptual examination of painting today. Individual and group criticism, combined with field trips and discussion, expands perspectives within historical contexts. As students advance, they explore a variety of abstract and figurative possibilities for self-examination.
Register here.

Photography: Analog
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2130 Section A

This course is an introduction to photography as a visual language and teaches students techniques, aesthetics, and theories of photography through a variety of assignments, readings, and lectures. Students work primarily with analog media and darkroom techniques. They are encouraged to experiment with different modes of photography and are required to create a final project based on their own interests. Studio time and class critiques enable students to build a series of images that reflect aesthetic and technical exploration of analog techniques. All work is done in
black and white. Students must have a 35mm film camera with manual settings.
Register here.

Photography: Digital
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2131 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2131 Section B

New York City provides visual inspiration for students exploring digital photography. The class investigates the current practices, strategies, and materials used in digital photographic printing. Students refine and expand their image editing, file management, and workflow techniques to produce high-quality prints. They engage in print production, developing the ability to see and talk about color, tone, and material and the quality of the final output. Understanding color management—including color space, post-production methods, and the intersection of light and material—is fundamental to the course.
Register here.

Game Design
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2121 Section A

This course introduces students to principles of game theory and fundamentals of interaction design. Students explore methods for creating analog and digital games by experimenting with a variety of physical objects and digital interfaces. They
develop an understanding of game structure, play experience, and the community aspect of gaming culture. Students are introduced to basic coding, enabling them to create their own games using a range of software and open source programs. Studio work is supplemented by analysis of existing games, guest lectures by game designers, and peer-to-peer play testing.
Register here.

Graphic Design
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2110 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2110 Section B

Graphic design is the visual language of everyday life, used in everything from magazine ads to film titles to product packaging. In this course, students are introduced to the fundamentals of visual research, composition, typography, and the organization of information. A key goal for all students is learning to develop powerful concepts. Students address a series of design problems through concept-driven solutions that explore 2D and digital making. The role of typography in design is explored in depth, with an emphasis on the selection of the most appropriate typeface for each project. Students are introduced to digital tools, including the Adobe Creative Suite.
Register here.

Graphic Design II
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2112 Section B

Students build on their graphic design experience by investigating real-world applications of communication design, with an emphasis on concept development as applied to problem solving. Through projects, students learn to employ narrative and storytelling methods and engage in design research, analysis, documentation, and implementation. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between individual creative and critical thinking skills and the designer’s role within the professional arena. Topics covered include creation of the elements of brand identity programs, such as logos, publications, advertisements, and websites. Students explore advanced techniques in the Adobe Creative Suite. By the end of the course, students will have learned to apply design principles and visual elements effectively in a wide variety of business identity and communication problems. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I or the equivalent and experience with Adobe Creative Suite.
Register here.

Graphic Design: Letterpress
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2118 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2118 Section B

In this printmaking course, students interested in design and fine arts learn the basics of letterpress printing using lead and wood type. Students set type, create visual designs on the press, and print on the Vandercook Proofing Press, developing a thorough knowledge of letterpress through experimentation and practice. Students work in groups to respond to visual design challenges. For the final project, each student designs and executes a printed work that builds on the skills and ideas developed in class.
Register here.

Illustration: Beyond the Page
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2106 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2106 Section B

This class explores the ever-expanding territory where illustration meets design. The hybrid designer-illustrator is head and shoulders above the pack, possessing drawing skills; a keen sense of color, typography, and layout; and an interest in doing it all. Today’s new breed is poised for long and varied careers. Guest speakers who exemplify these qualities present case studies; slide show lectures provide inspiration; and practical assignments afford students opportunities to produce portfolio work. Assignments include a range of packaging, objects, logos, animation boards, and advertising, all created using a multidisciplinary approach.
Register here.

Interior Design: Digital and Physical Model Making
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2206 Section A
College/Adult Session II
(July 6–24)
PNNY 2206 Section B

Today’s interior designer must have experience with digital and physical making as well as the language to work across both spaces. Digital modeling has evolved to become more than just another design tool. It is a device for enabling innovative project development. While there is a new focus on digital technology, physical model making also continues to be a crucial component of design. It has become increasingly reliant on a hybrid of hand fabrication and digital outputting, often combining processes that mimic the construction process. This course is designed to help students develop these model-making skills. It offers students a collaborative environment in which they can work together constructing model interiors.
Register here.

Printmaking
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2116 Section A

This course introduces students to a range of printmaking processes. Students explore graphics, color theory, drawing, design, and composition. They create portfolio-quality prints using professional techniques in a range of assignments, both representational and conceptual. The class covers etching, drypoint, and monotype as well as less conventional techniques.
Register here.

Project Studio: 2D
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2105 Section A

Whether you are looking to start a new project or further develop current work, this studio gives you space and focused time to explore with a group of like-minded peers. The course is intended for students who wish to dive deep into a 2D project under the guidance and support of a fine artist. Studio time is devoted to cultivating a concept to be developed through research and class critiques. Students can choose to work in a range of 2D media, including drawing, painting, and digital and mixed media. Guest artists and visits to museums and galleries allow students to further explore their creative practice in the context of New York’s contemporary art scene.
Register here.

Silkscreen
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2117 Section A

This course explores the use of various screen-printing techniques, emphasizing compositional as well as technical skills for diverse applications. Projects are geared to the needs and interests of the individual student. All basic methods are demonstrated, including the use of handmade and computer-generated stencils. These techniques can be employed in areas such as fashion design, graphic design, and photography.
Register here.

Urban Design: Designing the City
College/Adult Session I
(June 1–19)
PNNY 2303 Section A

A studio project to design a small urban public space in New York City provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of urban design. Students learn to address complex site-based problems through field observation, measuring, drawing, model making, and relating small public spaces to the culture of the city. They build technical skills and develop the understanding of scale, form, and spatial relationships needed to interpret the urban environment. Students divide their time between designing in the studio, acquiring skills in the representation and analysis of space, and gaining on-site experience in New York City through field trips to public spaces.
Register here.