feedback

Degree Programs

  • MA in Global Political Economy and Finance

    The MA in global political economy and finance provides students with a sophisticated understanding of the world economy in historical context, the political economic analysis of the dynamics of contemporary world capitalist society, and state-of-the-art tools of political economic and financial analysis.

    The program offers the training required to pursue advanced degrees in economics, finance, business, law, international relations, public policy, and related fields, and provides students with the analytical and policy skills required for careers in the fields of finance, government, business, labor organization, and international development. In addition to offering a rigorous course of study in economic and statistical analysis, this program provides a thorough grounding in historical and contemporary political economy and finance, culminating in an internship or mentored research project. A flexible elective option allows for concentrations in classical political economy, international and development economics, financial economics, environmental economics, or the economics of labor markets and race, class, and gender.

    The master of arts program in global political economy and finance consists of seven required courses and three electives as described below. There is no written comprehensive examination; the MA degree is awarded for successful completion of the required 30 credits.

    • Three core courses (9 credits)
      GECO 6190 Graduate Microeconomics
      GECO 6191 Graduate Macroeconomics
      GECO 6181* Introduction to Econometrics
      *GECO 6189 Mathematics for Economics (or approval of the instructor) is a prerequisite for GECO 6181.
    • Two political economy courses (6 credits)
      GECO 5104 Historical Foundations of Political Economy I
      GECO 5108 World Political Economy
    • One of three finance courses (3 credits)
      GECO 6140 Financial Markets and Valuation
      GECO 6141 Principles of Financial Engineering
      GECO 6269 Financial Economics
    • Either an internship or mentored research (3 credits)
      GECO 6198 Internship (arranged with MA faculty advisor) or
      GECO 6993 Mentored Research
    • Three elective courses (9 credits)
      Electives can be any courses offered by the Department of Economics or courses offered by other departments that approved by the Economics faculty advisor.

    MA in Economics

    The master of arts program provides depth of knowledge and analytical skills in the field of economics with the flexibility of a wide range of elective choices, allowing each candidate to shape an individual concentration, such as economics and finance, classical political economy, interdisciplinary political economy, urban economics, or development economics.

    A total of 30 credits is required for the MA in economics. A maximum of three credits may be transferred from other institutions. Students may apply for transfer credits after completing six credits at The New School for Social Research. All courses are for three credits.

    Course Requirements
    The master of arts program consist of four core courses; five elective courses, up to three of which could be taken in other departments of The New School for Social Research or at the Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy; and an internship or mentored research. There is no written examination for the MA in economics, which is awarded for successful completion of the required credits.

    • Four core courses:
      GECO 6190 Graduate Microeconomics
      GECO 6191 Graduate Macroeconomics
      GECO 5104 Historical Foundations of Political Economy I
      GECO 6181* Introduction to Econometrics
      With the agreement of the MA faculty advisor, candidates with a strong background in economics may substitute appropriate upper-level courses for these core requirements.
      *GECO 6189, Mathematics for Economics, or the approval of the instructor is a prerequisite to GECO 6181.
    • Five electives
      Of the five elective courses required for the MA in economics, two must be taken from the courses offered or cross-listed by the Economics department, and three may be courses at the graduate level offered by other departments of The New School for Social Research or at Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy. The student's faculty advisor must approve the elective program.
    • Internship or Mentored Research
      GECO 6198 Internship (arranged with MA faculty advisor) or
      GECO 6993 Mentored Research

    Students who entered to the MA program before fall 2000 semester may have received the MA in economics under the old requirements, which included the "en passant" method. Consult the Department of Economics Procedures Guide for the old requirements. 

    MS in Economics

    The MS in economics is a terminal degree designed for students who wish to study economics in more depth than the MA allows, particularly to develop their research skills in economic modeling and econometrics, without being committed to completing a PhD degree. The 45-credit program provides a solid grounding in the history and contemporary development of political economic tools and, through education in the contemporary quantitative tools of analysis, extends this training to include a significant part of the PhD analytical core curriculum. The master of science degree is awarded for successful completion of 45 credits and passing of the MS examination.

    Course Requirements
    The master of science program consist of six core courses and eight elective courses.

    • Four core courses required of all master's degree candidates
      GECO 6190 Graduate Microeconomics
      GECO 6191 Graduate Macroeconomics
      GECO 5104 Historical Foundations of Political Economy I
      GECO 6181* Introduction to Econometrics
      *GECO 6189, Mathematics for Economics, or the approval of the
      instructor is a prerequisite to GECO 6181.
    • Two additional core courses selected from the following list*
      GECO 6281 Advanced Econometrics I
      GECO 6200 Advanced Microeconomics I
      GECO 6202 Advanced Macroeconomics I
      GECO 6204 Advanced Political Economy I
      GECO 6206 Post-Keynesian Economics
      *With the agreement of the faculty advisor, students who entered the program with a strong background in economics may substitute other appropriate upper-level (6200-level) courses for one of both of these.
    • Nine elective courses
      Of the nine electives, three must be selected from courses offered or cross-listed by the Department of Economics; the other five may be courses offered by other departments of The New School for Social Research or by the Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy. The student's faculty advisor must approve the elective program.

    The Master of Science Examination
    The MS in economics requires that a student pass the MS examination offered twice a year. (With approval of the Department of Economics, a qualifying paper may be accepted in place of the MS examination.)

    PhD in Economics

    The New School for Social Research offers a distinctive doctoral program in economics. Core courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics are supplemented by courses in Marxian, post-Keynesian, and neo-Ricardian theory. Students develop two areas of concentration prior to beginning work on a dissertation.

    Admission to the PhD Program

    Students who complete a master's degree in economics at The New School are not automatically advanced into the PhD program. Acceptance to doctoral study requires separate application.

    Students matriculated in a master of art program in the Department of Economics can may petition to continue study toward the PhD degree as soon as they have registered for 30 credits. A department subcommittee review each petitioner's academic record and makes a decisions based on the qualifications of the student and the needs of the department. Three minimum conditions must be fulfilled for the subcommittee to consider a petition to continued study toward the PhD:

    • At least 18 credits must have been completed in residence at The New School for Social Research
    • The student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or better
    • The student must have completed at least one course in the PhD theory core and one graduate-level econometrics course with a grade of 3.5 or better

    Transfer Credits: Students with prior graduate work or with an MA from another university

    Students who wish to transfer to The New School for Social Research from other institutions must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better in their prior graduate work to be considered for admission.

    If admitted, transfer students must complete a minimum of 12 credits at The New School for Social Research with a grade point average of 3.5 or better, including at least one PhD core course (see below) with a grade of 3.5 or better. The student must apply to transfer credits from prior institutions as soon as possible after completing the 12 credits.

    Up to 30 credits may be transferred to The New School for both regular and seminar courses taken at other institutions. No transfer credit will be granted for courses deemed by the department not relevant to the PhD in economics or for any course for which a grade of less than 3.0 was assigned.

    Once the application for transfer credits is reviewed and a decision made, if the sum of transfer credits and credits earned at The New School for Social Research totals at least 30 credits, the department will review the student's qualifications for continuation in PhD program.

    PhD Course Requirements
    A total of 60 credits is required for the PhD degree, including the 30 required for the MA degree. Up to nine credits may be taken as Directed Dissertation Study (GECO 7991). The following courses must be included within the 60 credits.

    • Three core courses required of all PhD students
      GECO 6200 Advanced Microeconomics I
      GECO 6202 Advanced Macroeconomics I
      GECO 6281 Advanced Econometrics I
    • One of two other core courses
      GECO 6204 Advanced Political Economy I or
      GECO 6206 Post-Keynesian Economics

    Students must receive grades of 3.0 or better in all four core courses to continue. (A student who receives a grade of less than 3.0 in a core course is permitted to retake the examination in that course within one year of the end of the semester in which the course was taken. No core course examination can be taken more than twice.) Students are not required to take a PhD qualifying examination in the core course material, although they are free to select advanced macroeconomics, advanced microeconomics, advanced political economy, or advanced econometrics as elective fields from the areas of concentration.

    Areas of Concentration
    In addition to the core theory curriculum, each student chooses two areas of concentration, which will be the subjects of the student's comprehensive examinations.

    The Department of Economics regularly offers the following areas of concentration:

    • Advanced macroeconomics
    • Advanced microeconomics
    • Advanced political economy
    • Economic development
    • Finance
    • History of economic thought
    • International economics
    • Labor economics
    • Money and banking

    Other areas of concentration may be available subject to faculty availability:

    • Class and gender
    • Economic history
    • Industrial organization
    • Race and class
    • Public finance

    All students must select one concentration from the list above. The second concentration can also be selected from the list or students may, if they wish, define their own second concentration or define an interdisciplinary concentration by combining concentrations from the list above. Individually defined concentrations are subject to approval of the department, which may depend on faculty availability.

    Seminar Requirement
    Three credits must be fulfilled in the form of seminar requirements. Seminar credits can be earned only after a student has completed Advanced Microeconomics I, Advanced Macroeconomics I, and Advanced Econometrics I. Seminar credits can be earned only from work associated with an upper-level course. Seminar credits cannot be earned through directed dissertation study. All seminar credits require faculty approval. Transfer credit cannot be used to fulfill the seminar requirement.

    Grade Point Average
    The award of the PhD degree requires a final cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or better.

    PhD Qualifying Examination
    See the academic calendar for examination dates. Student can request permission from the department to take the PhD qualifying examinations after they have

    • completed 45 credits with an overall grade point average 3.5 or better in courses taken at The New School for Social Research and
    • satisfactorily completed the three-semester requirement in economic analysis and the econometrics core requirement.

    The PhD qualifying examination will consist of either:

    • a three-hour written exam in each of the student's two areas of concentration chosen or
    • a three-hour written exam in one area of concentration and an original research paper of high scholarly quality in the second area. Permission to submit a paper in lieu of examination must be obtained from a faculty member, who agrees to be the student's supervisor for the paper, and from the department chair. The paper will be read and graded by two faculty members, one of whom will be the student's supervisor. For further information about this option, consult the Department of Economics Procedures Guide

    Mathematics Requirement
    Although there are no formal requirements in mathematics, students must have sufficient competence to pass all courses that use mathematical techniques, such as the PhD theory core courses.

    Language Requirement
    The Department of Economics requires literacy in one foreign language relevant to the student's intended program of study. Literacy must be shown by translating from the chosen language a substantial section of a reading on economics designated by the department. Requests to take the exam may be submitted to the department secretary. Alternatively, a student may satisfy the language requirement by showing competence in mathematics, as demonstrated by a grade of 3.5 or higher in GECO 6189 or the equivalent.

    Dissertation Proposal, Oral Examination, and Dissertation
    A student is considered a doctoral candidate only after passing a dissertation proposal defense, which also serves as an oral examination. Students must first submit a dissertation proposal to the supervisor of their dissertation committee. This proposal must be approved by the three members of the dissertation committee prior to the oral examination. Students are also responsible for scheduling a date for their oral exam through the University Records Office. This scheduling must be done six weeks prior to the date of the oral defense. The student must pass this examination in the area of the proposed dissertation research. The language requirement must be met, and no more than six credits may be outstanding before the oral examination can be scheduled.

    The student must complete and defend the dissertation in a manner acceptable to The New School for Social Research (see Dissertation Requirements in the Admission section of this website).

    Master of Philosophy in Economics

    The degree of master of philosophy in economics is conferred upon a registered student who has fulfilled all the requirements for the PhD in economics except the dissertation proposal defense and the written dissertation.

    Satisfaction of the PhD Dissertation Requirement in Economics Extra Muros
    At any time within ten years from the date the MPhil degree was awarded and subject to approval by the department chair, a recipient of the MPhil in economics who has not continued studies in residence at the university may present to the university a substantial body of independent and original published scholarly work in lieu of a sponsored dissertation toward completion of the requirements for the PhD degree.

    An applicant who wishes to submit material prepared extra muros should ascertain through the chair of the Department of Economics the specific requirements of the department. Recipients of the MPhil degree not in residence at the university are not entitled to guidance or supervision by the faculty. The submitted material will be reviewed by the chair in consultation with other members of the faculty to determine whether or not the candidate is eligible to sit for a final examination.

    If the decision to examine the candidate is favorable, the chair will name a committee of at least five members for that purpose, including four from the Department of Economics, one of whom will chair. The examination must satisfy the committee that the quality of the candidate's work meets the standards of the university for a doctor of philosophy in economics. This examination may be taken only once. It is either passed or failed. The decision of the committee is final.

    The applicant must register for maintenance of status for the term in which he or she sits for the final examination.

    Department of Economics Procedures Guide
    More details about MA and PhD degree requirements can be found in the Department of Economics Procedures Guide, available from the department student advisors or downloadable as a PDF from the website.

    Graduate Study Abroad

    The Department of Economics participates in the university's Democracy and Diversity program in South Africa and maintains student and faculty exchange programs with the University of Bremen (Germany), the University of Frankfurt (Germany), and the University of Siena (Italy).

    Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy

    Students in the Department of Economics can take as electives a wide range of courses in economic policy, public finance, urban economics, and health economics offered by the Milano School, one of the schools that constitute The New School for Public Engagement. A short list of Milano School courses recommended for graduate economics students would include MHTC5020 Political Economy of the City; MIOR5074 Race, Gender, and Public Policy; MPLC6516 Public Finance and Fiscal Policy; and MPLC7010 Advanced Policy Analysis. Visit the University's Online Catalog to see the course offerings of the Milano School with descriptions and schedules.

Connect with the New School
×