Past Fellows

Maurice Berger, PhD  

Wendy T. Ewald

Andrea Geyer

Margarita Gutman

Susan Hapgood

Sharon Hayes

Danny Hoch

Ashley Hunt

Bouchra Khalili

Lin + Lam

Kobena Mercer

Lorraine O'Grady

Olu Oguibe

Silvana Paternostro 

Wendy Perron

Marjetica Potrc

Leslie Prosterman

Walid Raad

 

Sarah Rothenberg 

Edward Rothstein

Katya Sander

Robert Sember

Joshua Simon

Elisabeth Sussman

David Thorne

Jonathan Weinberg

 


Maurice Berger, PhD

Cultural historian and curator - Appointed 1994
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Berger

Maurice Berger is a senior fellow of The Vera List Center for Art and Politics, The New School, and senior research scholar of the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, University of Maryland Baltimore County. Berger's writing on art, culture, and the politics of race has appeared in many journals and newspapers, including Artforum, Art in America, the New York Times, the Village Voice, October, Wired, and the Los Angeles Times. He is the author of 11 books, including the critically acclaimed memoir White Lies: Race and the Myths of Whiteness (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1999) and the forthcoming For All The World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights (Yale, 2009). Venues for his exhibitions have included the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, The Jewish Museum (New York), the International Center of Photography, the National Museum of African American History and Culture (Smithsonian Institution), the New Museum of Contemporary Art (New York), the Santa Monica Museum, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and The Andy Warhol Museum.


Wendy T. Ewald

Artist - Appointed 2000

For 40 years Wendy Ewald has collaborated on art projects with children, families, women, and teachers in Labrador, Colombia, India, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, and the United States. Starting as documentary investigations of places and communities, Ewald's projects probe questions of identity and cultural differences. In her work with children she encourages them to use cameras to record themselves, their families, and their communities and to articulate their fantasies. Her hybrid work challenges the concept of who actually makes an image, who is the observer and who the observed.

Wendy Ewald has received many honors, including a MacArthur Fellowship and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation. She was a senior fellow at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at the New School University. She has had solo exhibitions at venues including the International Center of Photography, the Center for Creative Photography, the Nederlands Foto Institute, and the Corcoran Gallery of American Art. Her work was included in the 1997 Whitney Biennial. She has published ten books. Her fifth, a retrospective documenting her projects entitled Secret Games, was published in 2000.


Andrea Geyer

Artist - Appointed 2006-07
www.andreageyer.info

Andrea Geyer is a German artist, who has been living and working between Freiburg, Germany and New York City since 1996. Geyer uses both fiction and documentary strategies in her image and text based works. She investigates historically evolved concepts such as national identity, gender and class in the context of the ongoing re-adjustment of cultural meanings and social memories in current politics. Recent works include "Spiral Lands," a photographic and textual historiography of the ongoing dispossession of lands from Indigenous people by colonization, governmentality, capitalist development that constitute one of the longest struggle for social justice in North America and "9 Scripts from a Nation at War" about the current war in Iraq. She is a 2000 graduate of the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, after having studied Fine Arts at the Academy of Fine Arts, Braunschweig, and Photojournalism at the Fachhochschule Bielefeld.

Her work has been shown at RedCat/Los Angeles; LACE/Los Angeles; Hessel Museum/Bard College; Vera List Center for Arts and Politics/The New School; the Whitney Museum of American Art; Apex Art; Artist Space/New York; TATE Modern; Serpentine Gallery/London; Generali Foundation; Secession/Vienna; Smart Project Space/Amsterdam; IASPIS/Stockholm; the Turin Biennale/Italy; and documenta12/Kassel. In 2008 she also had solo shows at the Galerie Thomas Zander/Cologne and Galerie Hohenlohe/Vienna. 


Margarita Gutman

Associate Professor in Urban Studies and International Affairs, The New School - Appointed 2001

Margarita Gutman received her degree in architecture from the University of Buenos Aires, and went on to teach architectural and urban history at Facultad de Arquitectura, Diseño y Urbanismo, Universidad de Buenos Aires between 1975 and 1993, where she holds a Chair and has been Professor of Urban History since 2004. She has been a Scholar at The Getty Research Institute, and at The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. In New York, she has been a Visiting Fellow at the NYU International Center for Advanced Studies, and a Senior Fellow at The Vera List Center of Art and Politics. Ms. Gutman has published numerous books and articles, including editing the prize-winning Buenos Aires 1910: Memoria del Porvenir(1999), and Construir Bicentenarios: Argentina (2005).


Susan Hapgood

Curator - Appointed 1999
www.ici-exhibitions.org
Mumbai Art Room

Susan Hapgood is senior advisor at ICI (Independent Curators International) in New York and founder and director of the Mumbai Art Room. She was ICI’s director of exhibitions, developing and managing the exhibitions program for seven years, until 2010. She has worked in a curatorial capacity for institutions including the Guggenheim Museum, New Museum, and American Federation of Arts. She has written more than 60 catalog essays and magazine articles for publication and curated the exhibitions Slightly Unbalanced, FluxAttitudes, Neo-Dada: Redefining Art 1958-62, and Video Divertimento. Hapgood has an MA in Art History from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.


Sharon Hayes

Artist - Appointed 2006-07
www.shaze.info  

Sharon Hayes' work moves between multiple media—video, performance, installation—in an ongoing investigation into the interrelation between history, politics and speech. She employs conceptual and methodological approaches borrowed from practices such as performance, theater, dance, anthropology and journalism. Her work has been shown at the New Museum for Contemporary Art, P.S. 1 Museum of Contemporary Art, Art In General, Artists Space, Parlour Projects, Andrew Kreps Gallery, Dance Theater Workshop, Performance Space 122, the Joseph Papp Public Theater, the WOW Cafe and the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York and at the Room Gallery at UC Irvine, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Track 16, Gallery 2102 and The Project in Los Angeles. She has also shown at the Tate Modern in London, Museum Moderner Kunst and the Generali Foundation in Vienna, the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin and in other galleries, exhibition or performance spaces in California, Florida, Rhode Island, Texas, and Vermont, Bogotá, Berlin, Copenhagen, Malmö, Vienna, Vancouver and Zagreb, as well as in 45 lesbian living rooms across the United States.

Hayes was an artist in the Yokohama Triennial 2008, Guangzhou Triennial 2008 and PERFORMA05. Additionally, her collaborative piece "9 Scripts from a Nation at War" was shown in Documenta 12 in Kassel, Germany and subsequently at the Tate Modern in London and REDCAT in Los Angeles. Hayes received a New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) Fellowship and a MacDowell Colony fellowship in 1999. She held a two-year Jacob K. Javits Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Education, 2001-2003, and received a NYSCA Individual Artist Grant in 2006 followed by a fellowship from The Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation in 2008.

She has also participated in several residency programs inside and outside of the U.S. including I.A.S.P.I.S. in Malmö, Sweden, 2003, the Banff Centre for the Arts in Alberta, Canada, 2004, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, 2004, and Smack Mellon Studios in Brooklyn, 2005-2006. She is currently an Assistant Professor at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.


Danny Hoch

Actor, playwright, director - Appointed 2000
www.dannyhoch.com

Danny Hoch is an actor, playwright and director whose plays "Pot Melting," "Some People," and "Jails, Hospitals, Hip-Hop" have garnered many awards including two Obies, an NEA Solo Theatre Fellowship, a Sundance Writers Fellowship, the CalArts/Alpert Award In Theatre, and a Tennessee Williams Fellowship. His theater work has toured to 50 U.S. cities and 15 countries. He is a Senior Fellow of the New School's Vera List Center for Art and Politics and his writings on hip-hop, race and class have appeared in The Village Voice, the New York Times, Harper's, The Nation, American Theater, and various books: Out Of Character, Extreme Exposure, Creating Your Own Monologue and Total Chaos. His book Jails, Hospitals & Hip-Hop is in its second printing by Villard Books/Random House.

His writing and acting credits for television and film include "Bamboozled," "Washington Heights," "Prison Song," Some People," "Subway Stories," "Thin Red Line," "Whiteboys," "Blackhawk Down," "American Splendor," "War Of The Worlds," "Lucky You," "HBO Def Poetry" and the film version of "Jails, Hospitals & Hip-Hop." Most recently he appears alongside Joaquin Phoenix, Robert Duvall and Eva Mendes in "We Own The Night."

Mr. Hoch founded the Hip-Hop Theater Festival in 2000 which has since presented over 100 Hip-Hop Generation plays from around the globe and now appears annually in New York, Chicago, Washington, DC and San Francisco/Oakland. He directed Will Power's hit show "Flow" at New York Theatre Workshop, as well as the bilingual "Representa" at the the SFIAF, and his own "Till The Break Of Dawn" at New York's Abrons Arts Center in 2007. He was the 2007 Sundance Theatre Lab's Playwright-In-Residence and was awarded a 2008 Guggenheim Fellowship for Drama. His new play "Taking Over," about gentrification, will open at New York City's Public Theater in November 2008.


Ashley Hunt

Artist - Appointed 2006-07

www.ashleyhunt.org
www.correctionsproject.com
www.aworldmap.com

An artist and activist based in Los Angeles, Hunt works with video, mapping and installation to interrogate language, subjectivity and public discourse. His primary work of the past six years has been the development of The Corrections Documentary Project, which deals with the growth and commercialization of the U.S. prison system—its politics, its effects and resistances to it. His most recent works have expanded this investigation into discourses of globalization and citizenship, while tracing the role of the prison industrial complex in structuring the racial and class dynamics of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in New Orleans.

Much of his work has been in collaboration with grassroots groups including Critical Resistance, Friends and Families of Louisiana's Incarcerated Children, the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana, the Prison Moratorium Project (New York) and Southern Echo/Citizens for Quality Education (Mississippi). Hunt's work has been exhibited at the Martin Luther King Jr. Center in Atlanta, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Vera List Center for Arts and Politics in New York, the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore, Kunst-Werke Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, as well as numerous grassroots and community based venues throughout the U.S. He currently teaches at University of California at Irvine.


Bouchra Khalili

Artist - Appointed 2011-2013
Invisible Roads
Project Gallery: Bouchra Khalili 

A Moroccan-French visual artist born in Casablanca, Morocco, Bouchra Khalili investigated New York’s population of over half a million undocumented immigrant laborers and will examine everyday objects that accompany their clandestine, largely invisible existence for her fellowship project, Paper Tracks. Khalili studied film at the Sorbonne nouvelle and visual arts at the Ecole nationale supérieure d’arts de Paris-Clergy. She is a professor of new media and video at the Ecole supérieure des beaux-arts in Marseille and a founding member and film curator at the Cinémathèque de Tanger, a not-for-profit based in Tangiers, Morocco.

Khalili’s work in video, mixed media installations, and prints combines a conceptual approach with a documentary practice to explore issues of nomadism, clandestine existences, and the émigré experience. In her work she explores language, subjectivity, minority discourse, and speech, investigating the interrelationships between contemporary migrations and colonial history and physical and imaginary geography. Khalili’s work has been shown extensively around the world, including recently at the Perez Art Museum Miami (2013); the 10th Sharjah Biennial (2011); the Liverpool Biennial (2010); The Studio Museum in Harlem (2010); INIVA, London (2010); the Reina Sofía National Museum, Madrid (2009); and the Guangzhou Triennial (2008).


 

Lin + Lam

 

Artists - Appointed 2009

Since 2001, Lin + Lam have produced interdisciplinary projects that examine the ramifications of the past for the current sociopolitical moment. Attentive to materiality, site, and the specificities of different medium, their collaboration integrates their individual strengths and backgrounds. Trained in architecture, H. Lan Thao Lam uses photography, sculpture, and installation to address social memories of time, place and politics. Informed by critical cinema, Lana Lin has been interested in translation and the processes of identification. Their work has been exhibited at international venues including the New Museum, The Kitchen, the Queens Museum, and LMAK Projects in New York, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, Arko Arts Center (Korean Arts Council,) Seoul, Korea, the Arte Nuevo InteractivA'07 Biennial, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Merida, Mexico, and the 3rd Guangzhou Triennial, Guangzhou, China.

Lam received her MFA from CalArts and has been assistant professor at Middle State Tennessee University and Goddard College's MFA program. Lin received her MFA from Bard College and has been assistant professor at Massachusetts College of Art and the City College of New York. They have been honored with awards from the U.S. Fulbright Foundation, the Jerome Foundation, New York Foundation for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, and the Princess Grace Foundation, among others. 


Kobena Mercer

Sociologist - Appointed 1999
Yale University Faculty

Kobena Mercer writes and teaches on the visual arts of the black diaspora as professor of the history of art and African American studies at Yale University and is a senior research fellow in the Department of Visual Culture and Media at Middlesex University London. He has taught at New York University, University of California at Santa Cruz, and California Institute of the Arts and has received fellowships from Cornell University, University of California, Irvine, and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School. Born in London in 1960, Mercer was educated in Ghana and England and received his BA in Fine Art from St Martins School of Art and his PhD in Sociology from Goldsmiths' College, University of London.

Kobena Mercer's first book, Welcome to the Jungle: New Positions in Black Cultural Studies (1994) collected essays that address the politics of representation in contemporary visual culture. His publications feature in several landmark anthologies including Out There (1990),The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader (1992), Art and Its Histories: A Reader (1998), Visual Culture: The Reader (1999), The Third Text Reader on Art, Culture and Theory (2002), and Theorising Diaspora (2003). He has written monographs and exhibition catalog essays on subjects including James VanDer Zee, Adrian Piper, Isaac Julien, Keith Piper, and Rotimi Fani-Kayode and is the author of Black Male (1994), Pictura Britannica (1997), and Africas: The Artist and The City (2001). He is the editor of Annotating Art Histories, a four-volume series from MIT Press and the Institute of International Visual Arts, whose first title, Cosmopolitan Modernisms (2005), will be followed by Discrepant Abstraction (forthcoming, 2006).


Lorraine O'Grady

Artist - Appointed 1997
lorraineogrady.com

Lorraine O'Grady is a performance and installation artist based in New York City. Born in 1934, she was educated at Wellesley College and the Iowa Writers Workshop and, following careers as a research economist, translator, and rock critic, began making art in 1980. Her work, dealing with issues of hybridity, diaspora, and black female subjectivity, contains an unusual amalgam of abrasive political content united with beauty and formal elegance. An analysis of cultural politics via a deceptively pleasing aesthetic harmony has characterized O'Grady's work from her earliest performances, such as "Mlle Bourgeoise Noire" and "Nefertiti/Devonia Evangeline," to more recent photo-installations such as "Flowers of Evil and Good."

O'Grady has had solo exhibits in the Matrix series of the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, and at the Thomas Erben Gallery, New York, and her group exhibits include "Outside the Frame: Performance & The Object," Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art; "New Histories," Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; "NowHere," Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark; and "Between the Lines," Daniel Reich temp. at the Chelsea Hotel. Her work is featured in the first museum show of feminist art, "Wack! Art and the Feminist Revolution," opening at the L.A. Museum of Contemporary Art (Geffen Contemporary) in March 2007. In addition, O'Grady's writing and criticism has appeared in such publications as Artforum, Afterimage, X-tra, and the CAA's Art Journal. Her influential article "Olympia's Maid: Reclaiming Black Female Subjectivity" is widely anthologized; she was also an important contributor to The 1980s: An Internet Conference, edited by Maurice Berger.

Writing in the New York Times of O'Grady's appearance at Daniel Reich temp, Holland Cotter described her as "one of the most interesting American conceptual artists around."


Olu Oguibe

Artist, critic, and curator - Appointed 2000
University of Connecticut Faculty

Olu Oguibe is a professor at the Institute for African American Studies and in the Departments of Art and Art History at the University of Connecticut, where he teaches studio practices and art theory. He graduated summa cum laude and was valedictorian at the University of Nigeria in 1986 and received his PhD in the history of contemporary art from the University of London in 1992. Since then. he has taught at the School of Oriental and African Studies and Goldsmiths College, both of the University of London, as well as the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of South Florida, where he held the Stuart Golding Endowed Chair in African art.

Oguibe has published several books and articles on art, among them The Culture Game (University of Minnesota Press, 2004) and Uzo Egonu: An African Artist in the West (1995). He has also organized art exhibitions for major museums and galleries including the Tate Gallery of Modern Art, London, and the municipal museum of Mexico City. His own art has also been exhibited in museums and galleries around the world, including the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Oguibe was a senior fellow of the Smithsonian Institution in 2006 and a resident scholar at the Rockefeller Study and Conference Center in Bellagio, Italy, in 1999. His hobbies include music, architectural and industrial design, and collecting articles of modern design, 19th- century Connecticut mantle clocks, and classic British sports cars. (Biography as of 2006)


Silvana Paternostro

Writer - Appointed 1995
www.silvanapaternostro.com

Silvana Paternostro is a Colombian-born journalist, writer, and film producer. She is the author of My Colombian War: A Journey Through the Country I Left Behind and In The Land of God and Man: A Latin Woman's Journey, a finalist for the PEN/Martha Albrand Award. In 1999, she was selected by Time/CNN as one of 50 Latin American Leaders for the New Millennium for her innovative voice. Her articles and features have appeared in publications including the New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, TIME, and Paris Review. She was the associate producer of Steven Soderbergh's Che, The Argentine and Che, Guerrilla. She is a senior fellow at the World Policy Institute and lives in New York City. (Biography as of 2003)


Wendy Perron

Dancer and choreographer - Appointed 2001
www.dancemagazine.com/blogs/wendy

Wendy Perron, editor in chief of Dance Magazine 2004-2013, had a 30-year career as a dancer, choreographer, and teacher. She has written articles for The New York Times, The Village Voice, Ballet Review, Dance Research Journal, and Dance Magazine. Her brief memoir about dancing in the 60s and 70s appears in Sally Banes' book Reinventing Dance in the 1960s: Everything Was Possible. She also produced radio programs in the arts for WBAI Pacifica Radio and has been a commentator on WNYC. As a senior fellow at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics from 1999 to 2001, she presented panels on topics from artists' responses to 9/11 to fusion in dance forms. Her 2013 book, Through the Eyes of a Dancer, is a selection of her essays, memoirs, and reviews spanning 40 years.


Marjetica Potrc

Artist and architect - Appointed 2007-08
www.potrc.org

Marjetica Potrc is a Slovenian artist and architect whose work has been exhibited extensively throughout Europe and the Americas, including solo exhibitions at the Guggenheim Museum in New York (2001) and The Curve, Barbican Galleries in London (2007); as well as the Sao Paolo (2006) and Venice (2003 and 2009) Biennales, among many other venues. Her numerous on-site installations include "Dry Toilet" (Caracas, 2003), "Balcony with Wind Turbine" (the Liverpool Biennial, 2004) and "The Cook, the Farmer, his Wife and their Neighbour" (Stedeijk Goes West, Amsterdam, 2009). She is the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including the 2000 Hugo Boss Prize. Potrc's essays on contemporary urban architecture include "Back to Basics: Objects and Buildings," in Designs for the Real World (Vienna: Generali Foundation, 2002); "Five Ways to Urban Independence," in Dreams and Conflicts – The Dictatorship of the Viewer (Venice: Venice Biennial, 2003); "Temporary Territories," in Beyond Green: Toward a Sensible Art (Chicago: David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, 2005); "Strategies of Transition" in Self Organisation/Counter-economic Strategies (edited by Superflex and published by Lukas and Sternberg, New York, 2006); and "Survival Strategies and Community Building in Post-Capitalism," Volume (Amsterdam), no. 18 (2008). Potrc is based in Ljubljana, Slovenia


Leslie Prosterman

Folklorist and cultural analyst - Appointed 2001

Leslie Prosterman has worked for various public agencies as a folklorist, museum consultant, and poet. Her experience in international, federal, state, and local programs includes writing cultural policy for UNESCO, consulting with the Smithsonian Institution, and teaching poetry in the West Tisbury Public Library. Prosterman is particularly interested in public culture, along with traditional and community-based arts, comparative aesthetics, writing and performance, and the politics of exhibition and display. Before being appointed a senior fellow at the Vera List Center, Prosterman was a tenured associate professor of American studies and folklore at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. After 20 years in the academy, she returned to the public sector as a poet and cultural activist. She is committed to facilitating the relationship between the arts and civil society and to the expansion of the public realm.

Prosterman is the author of a book of poetry, Snapshots and Dances (Garden District Press, 2011), along with poems in assorted journals and collections. She wrote a study on community and aesthetics, Ordinary Life, Festival Days: Aesthetics in the Midwestern County Fair (Smithsonian Institution University Press, 1995), and scholarly articles including "Subtle, intangible, and non-quantifiable. Aesthetics, Law, and Speech in Public Space" in The Arts of Democracy: Public Culture and the State (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009). She has also produced community arts festivals, curated an experimental exhibition (Framing the Exhibition: Multiple Constructions, UMBC, 2000), facilitated workshops on narrative with the elderly, and promoted opportunities for artists in traditional and alternative communities to be seen and heard. (Biography as of 2013)


Walid Raad

Artist - Appointed 2004-05

Walid Raad is a media artist and an Associate Professor of Art in The Cooper Union (New York, USA). Raad's works to date include mixed media installations, performance, video and photography, and literary essays. Raad's recent works include The Atlas Group, a fourteen-year project between 1990 and 2004 about the contemporary history of Lebanon, with particular emphasis on the Lebanese wars of 1975 to 1991. Raad's works have been shown at "Documenta 11" (Kassel, Germany), The Venice Biennale (Venice, Italy), The Whitney Biennial (New York, USA), "Homeworks" (Beirut, Lebanon) and numerous other museums and venues in Europe, the Middle East, and North America. His books include The Truth Will Be Known When The Last Witness Is Dead, and My Neck Is Thinner Than A Hair. Walid Raad is also a member of the Arab Image Foundation (Beirut/New York ~ www.fai.org.lb).


Sarah Rothenberg

Concert pianist - Appointed 1995

Rothenberg is the artistic and general director of Da Camera and is active as a performer, writer, educator, and creator of unique multidisciplinary performances linking music to literature and visual art. Rothenberg's live multimedia performance, The Blue Rider: Kandinsky and Music, commissioned by Works & Process at The Guggenheim, recently premiered to sold-out houses and critical acclaim at New York's Miller Theatre. She has performed more than 80 world premieres and was a member of the New York contemporary music ensemble Da Capo Chamber Players from 1985 to 1994. Rothenberg's writings have appeared in literary journals including TriQuarterly.

Before coming to Da Camera, Rothenberg co-founded the Bard Music Festival and served as co-artistic director of the festival for five seasons. She also served as chair of the Bard College Department of Music. Under her leadership, Da Camera has been a three-time winner of Chamber Music America-ASCAP's Adventurous Programming Award, won the CMAcclaim Award, and received a unique Special Commendation for Outstanding Programming Concepts from Chamber Music America in 1999. Rothenberg's early training was at The Juilliard School with Herbert Stessin. After graduating from The Curtis Institute of Music, where her teachers were Seymour Lipkin and Mieczeslaw Horszowski, Sarah studied the music of Olivier Messiaen in Paris with the composer's wife, Yvonne Loriod. In 2000, she was awarded the French Medal of Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. (Biography as of 2012)


Edward Rothstein

Cultural critic - Appointed 1999

After award-winning stints as music critic for The New Republic and chief music critic for the New York Times, Rothstein is now cultural critic-at-large for the London Times, writing in the Arts & Ideas section on culture, literature, music, intellectual life, and technology—in articles that move from "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy's Fab Five" to "Theodor Adorno and the Frankfurt School" in two paragraphs.
 
After receiving a bachelor's degree from Yale University (1973), Rothstein did graduate work in mathematics at Brandeis and earned a master's in English literature from Columbia University. His doctoral dissertation for the Committee on Social Thought (cataloged under music—philosophy and aesthetics, music theory—mathematics, and mathematics—philosophy) was published in 1995 as Emblems of Mind: The Inner Life of Music and Mathematics.

In the conclusion to Emblems of Mind, Rothstein defines the human attempt to understand music and mathematics in a way that captures the critical enterprise itself: "We begin with objects that look dissimilar. We compare, find patterns, analogies with what we already know. We step back and create abstractions, laws, systems, using transformations, mappings, and metaphors. This is how mathematics grows increasingly abstract and powerful; it is how music obtains much of its power, with grand structures growing out of small details."

Rothstein's ability to see music as metaphor has always influenced his criticism. "For most of my writing life," he said in an April 14, 2003, interview on the WFMU radio program The Speakeasy with Dorian, "I've been doing music criticism, but all along I was relating music to other things that were going on." And for much of the 1980s and 1990s, he continued, a recurring theme was "the dream of a perfect world," a longing for utopia with which he took issue in a 2001 New York Public Library lecture, "Utopia and Its Discontents." The title's Freudian reference, he told Speakeasy, was intentional: "Civilization is actually what we value as human beings. But the discontents are built into it. You can't have civilization without discontents. There is no such thing as the satisfaction of all desire." At the same time, he admitted that part of music's power comes from being "a way in which utopian thought is felt and expressed and transmitted, providing a glimpse of what could be if things were different—in other words, if we were inhuman." (Biography as of 2008)


Katya Sander

Artist - Appointed 2006-07
www.katyasander.net

Born in Denmark, Katya Sander is an artist based in Copenhagen and Berlin. She has worked with the symbolics of architecture, the power of display, and the notion of public sphere and civic society. Sander studied literature and cultural studies at the University of Copenhagen, and architecture and media art at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Copenhagen, and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum's Independent Studies Program.

Sander's work has been exhibited internationally in one person exhibitions at institutions such as the Museum Moderner Kunst, Vienna; the Kunstverein Munich; and the Rooseum, Malmoe. It was also featured in group exhibitions such as Capital (It Fails Us Now) at UKS, Oslo; Whatever Happened to Social Democracy? at Rooseum, Malmoe; Handlungsformate at Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, Berlin; Denmark Seen by its Painters and Writers at Brandts Klaedefabrik, Odense, Denmark; The North at Kunsthalle Vienna; The Collective Unconscious at Migros Museum, Zurich; the Havana Bienial, and the Nordic Art Biennial, Goeteburg. She is the editor (with Simon Sheikh) of the OE-reader series, published by b_books, Berlin.


Robert Sember

Artist - Appointed 2009

Robert Sember is a member of the international sound art collective Ultra-red, which collaborates with constituencies involved in migrant rights, fair housing and antiracist struggles, and efforts to combat the AIDS crisis. Recent projects include SCHOOL OF ECHOES, a multi-year exploration of militant sound investigations initiated during a three month residency at Raven Row, London, in early 2009; SILENT | LISTEN, an investigation of the conditions of the AIDS crisis in the United States and Canada presented in partnership with, among others, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Andy Warhol Museum, and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; WE COME FROM YOUR FUTURE, an investigation of antiracist movements in the United Kingdom, presented at Tate Britain, London; and, RE: ASSEMBLY, a long-term project on migration and citizenship commissioned by the Serpentine Gallery, London.

As a researcher in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University from 1998 to  2006, Robert focused on sexual rights, treatment access, community mobilization, and cultural production in response to the AIDS epidemic. He has taught in the Medical Anthropology Program in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences, the Department of World Arts and Cultures at the University of California in Los Angeles, the Center for HIV/AIDS Networking at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, and the Summer Institute on Sexuality, Culture and Society at the University of Amsterdam's Graduate School of Social Sciences.

Recent publications include: Rhine, D.T. and Sember, R. (writing for Ultra-red) (2009) Ten Preliminary Theses on Militant Sound Investigation. New York: Printed Matter; Padilla, M., Hirsch, J.S., Munoz-Laboy, M., Sember, R. and Parker, R.G. (eds) (2008) Love and Globalization: Transformations of Intimacy in the Contemporary World. New York: Vanderbilt University Press; Parker, R.G., Petchesky, R. and Sember, R. (eds) (2008) SexPolitics: Reports from the Frontlines. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Sexuality Policy Watch; and, Sember, R. (2009) "Sexuality Research in South Africa: The Policy Context." Vasu Reddy and Theo Sandfort, eds. From Social Silence to Social Science: Same-Sex Sexuality, HIV & AIDS and Gender in South Africa. Pretoria: HSRC Press. (Biography as of 2009)


Joshua Simon

Curator, filmmaker, writer - Appointed 2011-2013
Neomaterialsm book
Neomaterialsm blog

During his fellowship term, Joshua Simon investigated the object through various “stagings”—the auction, the experiment, the tag, the classified advertisement, the forwarded message—in order to examine historical and contemporary notions of the object as commodity, as surplus and excess in contemporary society, and as social agent. Simon is based in Tel Aviv-Jaffa.

Simon is the founding co-editor of Maayan Magazine for Poetry and Literature and The New & Bad Art Magazine and editor of Maarvon – New Film Magazine, all based in Tel Aviv-Jaffa. Among his publications are Red: Poems of the Working Class and Out! – Poets Against the Attack in Gaza (2008) both anthologies in Hebrew and Arabic (co-editor, May Day, 2007). He is also the co-editor of The Aesthetics of Terror (Charta, 2009), and the editor of United States of Palestine-Israel, published in the Solution series by Sternberg Press (2011). Recent curatorial projects include ReCoCo – Life Under Representational Regimes (co-curated with Siri Peyer, White Space, Zurich and Kunsthalle Exnergasse, Vienna, 2011), The Unreadymade (FormContent, London, 2010), Internazionale! (Left Bank, Israeli Communist Party Culture Club, Tel Aviv, 2008), and Come to Israel, It’s Hot and Wet and We Have The Humus! (Storefront for Art and Architecture, New York, 2008). A graduate of the School of History at Tel Aviv University, Simon is Director and Chief Curator at MoBY – Museums of Bat Yam in Tel Aviv and is currently in the Curatorial Knowledge PhD program in the Visual Cultures Department at Goldsmiths College, London. He teaches at Minshar College of Art and is head of theory studies, a postgraduate program, at Hamidrasha College of Art in Tel Aviv.


Elisabeth Sussman

Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art - Appointed 1999
www.whitney.org

Elisabeth Sussman is Curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art where she recently curated the exhibition "Remote Viewing: Invented Worlds in Recent Painting and Drawing" and is curating the forthcoming Gordon Matta-Clark retrospective. She has organized a number of other Whitney exhibitions including "Mike Kelley: Catholic Tastes" (1991); "Nan Goldin: I'll Be Your Mirror" (1996), with David Armstrong; "Keith Haring" (1997); and the Museum's 1993 Biennial. She has recently co-curated two exhibitions on the work of Eva Hesse: one of her drawings with The Drawing Center and another of her sculpture with the Jewish Museum, both in New York. For the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Sussman co-organized, with Renate Petzinger of the Museum Wiesbaden, a full retrospective on the work of Eva Hesse. The exhibition received the International Art Critics Association First Prize for the best monographic exhibition outside of New York in 2001 and 2002. For SFMOMA, Elisabeth Sussman also organized, with Sandra Phillips, a retrospective of the work of Diane Arbus. The catalogue for the Arbus exhibition has received the 2004 Infinity Award for Publication of the International Center of Photography. Elisabeth Sussman was a Fellow of the Rockefeller Foundation at the Rockefeller Study and Conference Center in Bellagio, Italy in 1999. She was a fellow at the Getty Research Institute in 2003. She is the author of many publications, including Lisette Model (Phaidon, 2001) and will be contributing essays on Robert Gober and Lee Bontecou for upcoming exhibition catalogues. (Biography as of 2003)


David Thorne

Artist - Appointed 2006-07
www.speculativearchive.org
www.mediaartists.org

David Thorne lives and works in Los Angeles. His current projects include The Speculative Archive; an ongoing series of photo-works titled a certain interpretation based on a certain set of assumptions in order to take a certain position (1991-present); Boom!, a collaboration with Austrian artist Oliver Ressler; and Scripts, a collaboration for Documenta 12 with Andrea Geyer, Sharon Hayes, Ashley Hunt, and Katya Sander. David is a 2004 recipient of a Rockefeller Media Arts Fellowship. He received his BS from The City University of New York in 2001 and completed his MFA in Interdisciplinary Studio at University of California Los Angeles in 2004. (Biography as of 2009)


Jonathan Weinberg

Artist and art historian - Appointed 2002
www.jonathanweinberg.com

Jonathan Weinberg is a painter and art historian. He is the author of Male Desire: the Homoerotic in American Art; Fantastic Tales: the Photography of Nan Goldin (with Joyce Robinson, curator); Ambition and Love in Modern American Art; and Speaking for Vice: Homosexuality in the Art of Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley and the First-American Avant-Garde. He co-edited with Diana Linden and Alejandro Anreus the anthology, The Social and the Real: Political Art of the 1930s in the Western Hemisphere. His reviews and articles have appeared in Art in America, Artforum, The Art Journal, and The Yale Journal of Criticism. He has taught at Bennington College, Cooper Union, and Yale University, and he is currently a Visiting Critic in the Graduate Printmaking Department at the Rhode Island School of Design. He has been a recipient of many fellowships including a 2002 Guggenheim Fellowship and most recently, a 2009 grant from Creative Capital to write the book Pier Groups: Art Along the New York City Waterfront in the 1970s and 80s. A mid-career retrospective of Weinberg's paintings, curated by Jonathan Katz, ran at the Leslie Lohman Gay Art Foundation in New York in March 2010. (Biography as of 2010)