Courses, Policies, and Procedures

Students register for only one course. New York Summer Intensives are rigorous, and students must expect to do substantial work daily in preparation for class. Taking other college courses and/or working a full-time job while you are enrolled in a summer intensive course is not recommended. You may be able to hold a part-time job, depending on your ability to manage your time and responsibilities.

Course Descriptions

All courses will meet for four hours daily four days a week, Monday through Thursday. In some courses, field trips may be scheduled outside of regular hours. Each course taps the resources of New York City in its own way, but students will opportunities to take advantage of these resources with their peers and on their own.

Inside Documentaries: What's the Story?
Instructor: Penelope Falk
Long gone are the days of “fly on the wall” documentary filmmaking when audiences were asked to watch what felt like hours (if not days) of seemingly unedited footage slowly unfold before them. Over the past 20 years, documentary films have surged in popularity, slowly but surely making their way into the mainstream. Inside Documentaries will examine both why and how the medium has evolved over the past two decades. Award-winning editor Penelope Falk will offer an insider’s perspective into the changing world of documentary filmmaking. Together, we will watch and analyze the films that have pushed the boundaries and changed the rules. We will debate what works and what doesn’t. We will explore the meaning of “truth” and “art” as it relates to non-fiction storytelling. We will talk to award-winning filmmakers and editors who will join us to present their work and answer all your questions. Best of all, we’ll watch a bunch of great movies. Meets Monday through Thursday, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Note: The first day of class is Tuesday, May 26, and the last day is Thursday, June 18.

The Politics of Space, Value and (Im)Permanence
Instructor: Ralph Lemon
In this 4-week lab, students will explore the possibilities of the ephemeral creative experience within and without form. Through the shared study of different time signatures, students will engage in a daily practice of re-thinking the art of practice. This course is for students interested in examining the live body, moving, writing, thinking, remembering, forgetting, choreographing, curating, performing, and engaging in thoughtful critique. Students will make excursions throughout New York City, and will have an opportunity to learn with a range of visiting artists and thinkers. There will be something new (old) everyday. Meets Monday through Thursday, 1:00-5:00 p.m. Note: The first day of class is Tuesday, May 26, and the last day is Thursday, June 18.

Redesigning Journalism
Instructor: Andrew Haeg
To create products or services for people very different from yourself, you need to abandon your own limited point of view and—as best as you can—put yourself in the shoes of people you're designing for. In this class, you’ll use techniques drawn from human-centered design and “design thinking” to get out of your comfort zone, and develop an empathetic understanding of New Yorkers’ unmet information needs. Students will also use GroundSource—a mobile surveying and engagement platform (as well as other tools)—as part of their outreach and engagement efforts. Finally, students will design an outreach and intervention plan to address the information needs they’ve discovered, and will present that plan to a potential partner organization to work with and implement their work. We'll spend much of this course outside the building exploring NYC, and visiting with guest lecturers who serve people's information-needs for a living -- from librarians to journalists, and museum curators. Meets Monday through Thursday, 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Note: The first day of class is Tuesday, May 26, and the last day is Thursday, June 18.

The Transformation of Experience: Thirteen Ways of Looking at--or Rather, Writing About
Instructor: Susan Choi
Of course there aren't just thirteen ways of looking at, or writing about, anything. The Wallace Stevens reference was just to get your attention. In this class we'll delve into the process by which experience is transformed into writing. We'll do this by sharing experience and transforming it; in our writing; in as many ways as we can. Multiplicity of results will be our aim; we will demonstrate that a single concrete reality has the capacity to give rise to countless works of art. This course will consist of four explorations, one per week. Each week will begin with an experience shared by the class, and extracted from this inexhaustible city. We may investigate a physical space, or consume a work of art. We may travel, or have a compelling encounter. Selected readings will multiply our insights. On Day Two, with a post-mortem of the previous day, collective brainstorming, and in-class writing, we'll begin the transformative process and generate a rough draft that takes our experience as its starting point. On Day Three, in pairs or trios, we'll workshop our drafts and revise. Day Four* will be devoted to sharing our works, and discussing our next exploration. Every participant will emerge from this course with four complete works of prose, as well as the indispensable skill to find material for writing anywhere and everywhere. Meets Monday through Thursday, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Note: The first day of class is Tuesday, May 26, and the last day is Thursday, June 18.

Policies and Procedures

  • Eugene Lang College 2015 Summer Program Policies (PDF)
  • The New School publishes complete institutional information on the university website, including academic policies, equal opportunity policies, and information about student rights and responsibilities, tuition and fees, disability services, and completion and transfer-out rates. Policies and procedures are also published in the Eugene Lang College Catalog (PDF).

Grades: You will receive a standard letter grade at the end of your course according to the instructor's evaluation of your work and participation. To see your grade, use the online student portal, MyNewSchool (see below).

Credits: All New York Summer Intensive courses carry four undergraduate credits. New School credits are normally transferable, but you should consult an academic advisor at your school before you register for a course to confirm transferability of the credits and application to your graduation requirements.

Records and transcripts: You can request that a transcript of your Summer Intensive course be mailed to another college or university by submitting the online Transcript Request to the Registrar's Office.

MyNewSchool: The New School's Web portal, MyNewSchool, gives you access to your New School email account; your student personal record; your registration, billing, and grades information; library resources; announcements; special offers for the New School community; and university news and events.

To access MyNewSchool, look up your NetID username by going to my.newschool.edu and selecting "Look up your NetID or Reset Your Password" in the log-in box. Once you have your NetID, return to the log-in page and enter your NetID and your default password, which is your date of birth in MMDDYY format.

The first time you log in, you are required to change your password. The password you set will be valid for 180 days. Return to the MyNewSchool log-in page and log in by entering your NetID and new password. You're all set.

Note: Whenever you log in to MyNewSchool, check your New School GroupWise email account by selecting the Webmail icon. All official university communications go to this email address. Check the account often or forward messages to your personal email account.

 
Connect with the New School