Lang

Academics

Faculty

  • Bhawani Venkataraman

    Associate Professor of Chemistry

    Office Location:

    Eugene Lang Building

    Profile:

    Educated as a physical chemist, my research is in the field of chemical education and focuses on understanding how to engage students in understanding chemistry and the relevance of understanding phenomena at the molecular scale. Currently I am investigating two approaches in improving the learning of chemistry: 1) the use of computer software visualization tools to assist students in “seeing” molecules and molecular interactions and in understanding how these microscopic constructs influence their macroscopic world; and 2) the use of contexts as a motivator and learning tool. My work has been published in chemical education research journals.  I am also involved in developing curricular materials that connect fundamental chemical principles and concepts to an understanding of environmental issues such as water and air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, and climate change.

    Another area of my research interest is in understanding what constitutes effective communication of basic scientific research to non-scientists on issues such as water quality, air pollution and climate change. Toward this work, I have written articles that investigate the challenges in ensuring access to safe drinking water and raise awareness of the delicate balance of earth’s atmosphere that allows life to be sustained on earth.

    Degrees Held:

    Ph.D. in Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, NY, August 1989
    M. Phil, Columbia University, New York, NY, August 1988
    Master of Arts, Columbia University, New York, NY, May 1985
    Bachelor of Science, St. Xavier's College, Mumbai, India, May 1984

    Professional Affiliations:

    American Chemical Society
    American Association for the Advancement of Science
    New York Academy of Sciences

    Recent Publications:

    1) Visualizing Dispersion Interactions, E. Gottschalk, B. Venkataraman, Journal of Chemical Education, 91, 666-672 (2014)
    2) Access to Safe Water: A Paradox in Developed Nations, B. Venkataraman, Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development, 55, 24-34 (2013)
    3) An Evaluation of the Chemical Origin of Life as a Context for Teaching Undergraduate Chemistry, B. Venkataraman, Chemical Education Research and Practice, 12, 379-387 (2011)
    4) Earth’s Thin Blue Line, B. Venkataraman, Air, Ed. John Knechtel, Alphabet City, MIT Press, October 2010
    5) The Price of Clean Water, B. Venkataraman, Water, Ed. John Knechtel, Alphabet City, MIT Press, October 2009
    6) Education for Sustainable Development, B. Venkataraman, Environment, March/April 2009, p. 8-10
    7) Visualization and interactivity in the teaching of chemistry to science and non-science students, B. Venkataraman, Chemical Education Research and Practice, 10, 62-69 (2009)
    8) Why Environmental Education, B. Venkataraman, Environment, September/October 2008, p. 8-10
    9) Chemistry of Life: Chemical Evolution as a Theme for Teaching Undergraduate Chemistry, B. Venkataraman, Chemical Evolution: Chemical Change Across Space and Time, American Chemical Society Conference Proceedings, Eds. L. Zaikowski, J. Freidrich, Oxford University Press: 2008, p. 378-388

    Research Interests:

    Chemical education, environmental education, curriculum development and assessment, communication of science behind environmental issues, science and policies of air pollution, drinking water quality, climate change, and energy

    Awards and Honors:

    Recent Grants

    1) Implementation and Continued Development of Assessment Tools for the Interdisciplinary Science Curriculum, B. Venkataraman, J. Wilson. Provost Innovation in Education Fund, June 2010 – May 2011 

    2) Assessment Tools for the Interdisciplinary Science Curriculum, B. Venkataraman, J. Wilson. Provost Innovation in Education Fund, January – June 2010 

    3) Adapting Active-Learning Methods for a Chemistry Curriculum at Eugene Lang College, B. Venkataraman, National Science Foundation Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement, September 2005 – August 2009,

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