Collier, Stephen J.

Collier, Stephen J.

Stephen J. Collier
PhD, Anthropology, University of California
Associate Professor of International Affairs, Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy

Areas of Expertise:
Post-socialism; Neoliberalism, Infrastructure; Social Welfare; Post-Soviet Russia; Contemporary Security
Profile:
Stephen J. Collier is an associate professor at the Graduate Program in International Affairs, where he has been teaching since 2003. He received his PhD in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2001, and worked as a consultant for the World Bank and held research and teaching positions at Columbia University before joining The New School faculty. He has conducted research and published on a range of topics including post-socialism, neoliberalism, infrastructure, social welfare, and—in a new project—domestic security and preparedness.

He is the author of Post-Soviet Social: Neoliberalism, Social Modernity, Biopolitics , and the co-editor (with Aihwa Ong) of Global Assemblages: Technology, Politics and Ethics as Anthropological Problems, and (with Andrew Lakoff) of Biosecurity Interventions. His scholarly articles and other writings have appeared in Theory, Culture, and Society, Economy and Society, Environment and Planning D, Anthropology Today, Anthropological Theory, Social Anthropology, Current Anthropology, and Post-Soviet Affairs. He is currently working on a book manuscript on the genealogy of vital systems security in the United States after World War II.
Courses Taught:
  • Global Flows
  • Managing Institutions for Development
  • Cities, Infrastructure, and Development
  • Technologies of Neoliberalism
  • Critical Security Studies

 

Recent Publications:
Global Assemblages: Technology, Politics and Ethics as Anthropological Problems, co-editor with Aihwa Ong. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004.

Biosecurity Interventions, co-editor with Andrew Lakoff. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008.

Post-Soviet Social: Neoliberalism, Social Modernity, Biopolitics. Princeton University Press, 2011.


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