Literary Reinvention
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Level: Undergraduate
Division: University-wide Programs
Department: University Lecture Program
Course Number: ULEC 2820
Course Format: Lecture
Location: NYC campus
Permission Required: No
Topics:
  • Literature
  • Humanities
  • Fiction
Description:
This course describes the dramatic shift in the conditions around which literature was produced in modernity. Economic changes and the invention of the printing press helped writers break away from the court and patronage of the princely, aristocratic, ecclesiastical or wealthy elites. As distinct traditions of reading and writing became a canon all literate readers were expected to know, authors retooled classic stories with a broader, more secular readership in mind. Literature became a laboratory in which words were pressed into service in a process of questioning truth and reality. Through a study of great modern authors (Shakespeare, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Virginia Woolf and others), students examine a complex interplay between the truth-telling and fictionalizing impulses in writing and reading. Through close study, students will achieve an understanding of the new ideas and techniques leading to the surpassing degree of irony and self-awareness that characterizes today’s literature. Students must register for both the lecture and discussion section of this course.
Students must register for both the lecture and discussion section of this course.
Course Open to: Degree Students
Restrictions:

Level

Open to Undergraduate students.