Parsons

  • Energy

    Energy In-Brief:  The New School is committed to cutting energy (mostly, in the form of electricity) consumption across the board 30% by 2025, as compared with 2015.  Oil-fired heating systems are in the process of being replaced by natural gas.

    Energy Consumption:For the year 2016, The New School’s energy sources including include: oil and steam for heat, natural gas for heat and cogeneration, and electricity. Electricity makes up the bulk largest portion of total energy use.

    Weather Normalized

    Portfolio Energy Intensity:

    This chart describes energy consumption by building across The New School’s campus. The size of each building (square footage) is represented by the size of each bubble. The y-axis (Site Energy Use Intensity) represents building energy consumption per square foot. The x-axis (Source Energy Use Intensity) represents the total energy used to produce and transport energy to the building, per square foot.  University Center is the only campus building open 24hrs a day, making it one of the most efficient, on an hourly basis.

      Total Lifecycle Energy Consumption

    Portfolio Total Energy Consumption:This chart describes energy consumption by building across The New School’s campus. The size of each building (square footage) is represented by the size of each bubble. The y-axis (Site Energy Use Intensity) represents building energy consumption per square foot. The x-axis (Source Energy Use Intensity) represents the total energy used to produce and transport energy to the building, per square foot. University Center is the only campus building open 24hrs a day, making it one of the most efficient, on an hourly basis.

    Energy Metrics FAQ’s:

    1. = Units of Measurement
    2. = Why it’s Important
    3. = How we’ll Achieve our Goals

    Electricity

    1. Kilowatt-hour (kWh)
    2. Electricity is the dominant form of energy use on campus at The New School, and it’s the cause of 2/3rds of our carbon emissions.
    3. More efficient heating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, LED lighting upgrades, IT equipment improvements, and behavior change.

    Natural Gas

    1. Therm
    2. Natural gas is important because it’s a cleaner-burning alternative to oil.  Gas will gradually replace oil on campus, growing from 28% of our energy consumption, to 42%.
    3. Building heating system improvements, University Center cogeneration plant optimization.

    Oil

    1. Gallon
    2. Oil is burned to heat many of our buildings.  Converting to natural gas boilers will reduce carbon emissions of these systems by 28%.
    3. More efficient heating systems, improved building operations, and oil to natural gas heating system conversions.

    Steam

    1. Million pounds (Mlb)
    2. Purchased steam is the primary source of heat and hot water at the Stuyvesant Park/318E 15th St residence hall.
    3. Steam system optimization and insulation.

    Site Energy

    1. British Thermal Units per Square Foot per Year (kBtu/sf-yr)
    2. Site energy is important because it’s indicative of how much total energy we use on the premises of our campus.  The formula evenly weights all forms of energy in units of British thermal units, or BTU’s.
    3. Improvements in this category are evenly effected by all forms of energy above.

    Source (total & indirect) Energy

    1. British Thermal Units per Square Foot per Year (kBtu/sf-yr)
    2. Source energy is perhaps more important than site energy, because it takes into account the amount of energy required to create particular forms of energy, such as electricity.  More than 3 units of energy are used in a power plant to produce one unit of usable electricity on our campus.
    3. All forms of energy are important, but source energy is most significantly influenced by electricity use, due to the inefficiency of producing and transporting it.

      Annual Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s):

      KPI Energy

      Outlook Analysis:

      1. The small increase in electricity is less worrisome than the percent increase indicates.  Weather is the root cause of 2.7% of the increase above the 2015 baseline, and an additional increase in electricity use is due to decreased cogeneration output at University Center, vs the 2015 baseline.  Promising gains in electricity reduction can be seen in locations where specific projects are under way, such as LED lighting at 2W13th St (resulting in more than a 10% reduction for the year).
      2. Natural gas consumption has decreased in part because of a warm winter- but also because of improved efficiency and operational measures.
      3. Oil consumption, similar to gas, is down in part because of warm winter weather, and improved efficiency measures.  Reductions are likely to be a continued trend- enhanced by oil to gas boiler conversions, ongoing maintenance, steam trap overhauls, radiator valve installations, and steam system insulation.
      4. Steam consumption at this time is not precisely known and hence is being held as ‘neutral’.  Con Edison is currently looking into a possible meter fault at 318E 15th St, the sole user of purchased steam.
      5. On-site energy use is down significantly, mainly due to reduced gas & oil consumption.
      6. Indirect (Source) energy, dominated by electricity consumption, requires further reductions on our part in order to keep pace with goals.

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