Parsons

  • Profile:

    David began his career design in the advertising and marketing industries, where he led the creative teams at various agencies in the Bay Area and Silicon Valley introducing technology products to the consumer marketplace.


    As the Creative Director for the Silicon Valley office of worldwide advertising and interactive agency Poppe-Tyson, he was responsible for the Sony PlayStation account. After serving as creative director for several San Francisco firms, Folender relocated to the Los Angeles area in 1998 and founded his own company, E-HAUS in Venice. His clients included The Gap, Hewlett-Packard, Adaptec, Coca-Cola, Nestle’s Nesquik, Maui & Sons, Fox Broadcasting Company, ESPN, NBC, Vin Di Bona Productions, Shell Petroleum, Sensa Pens, LACMA, The Henry Mancini Foundation, Asiana Airlines, Farmers Insurance Group and David Lee Roth.

    David sold his agency in 2007 and moved on to Dentsu America, one of the world’s largest agency companies where he built and oversaw the in-house digital practice as their Director of Interactive Services,. Toyota, Scion, Canon, Bandai Toys, Domaine Chandon and were among his clients while at Dentsu.

    Mr. Folender
    was an adjunct design professor at USC in Los Angeles and has taught Architecture and Design at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and for Syracuse University in Florence, Italy.

    His design education work while teaching at the New York City High School of Art and Design was featured in a series of documentary shorts for USA Networks as well as published in Youth & Advocacy, Journal of the Urban Network, Innovation in New York City.

    Degrees Held:

    BFA Environmental Design Art History Concentration, Parsons The New School, New York City, NY

     

     

    Current Courses:

    Digital Imaging w/ Photoshop 1 (Open Campus)

    Digital Layout: Adobe inDesign (Open Campus)

    Digital Imaging w/ Photoshop 1 (Open Campus)

    Digital Layout: Adobe inDesign (Open Campus)

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