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  • What is Title IX?

  • Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 states that no individual “shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.”  Title IX also prohibits retaliation against individuals who report sex-based or gender-based discrimination.  The New School is committed to complying with Title IX by providing a safe learning and working environment for all students and employees regardless of sex or gender-identity. The New School has adopted policies and procedures to prevent and respond to sex or gender-based discrimination in the form of sexual harassment, sexual assault, or other types of sexual misconduct. These policies and procedures apply to all members of the university community, including students, staff, and faculty. The New School has a designated Title IX Coordinator to ensure The New School’s compliance with and response to inquiries concerning Title IX and to provide resources for victims and community members who have experienced sex or gender-based discrimination. A person may also file a complaint with the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights regarding an alleged violation of Title IX by visiting the U.S. Department of Education website or calling 1.800.421.3481.

  • For issues, questions, or concerns about Title IX, contact:

    Jennifer Francone

    Assistant Vice President for Student Life and Title IX Coordinator

    72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor
    New York, NY 10011

    Phone: 212.229.5900 x3656
    Email: franconj@newschool.edu or Titleixcoordinator@newschool.edu

    For issues, questions, or concerns about Title IX when an employee is involved in the alleged violation, contact:


    Carol Cantrell

    Senior Vice President for Human Resources and Labor Relations

    80 Fifth Avenue, 8th floor
    New York, NY 10011

    Phone: 212.229.5671 x4900
    Email: cantrellc@newschool.edu

  • How to Report

    If you experience or witness sex-based discrimination or sexual assault and wish to file a report, you can do so through one of the following means.

  • Reporting Steps

    1. Submit an Incident Report Form by scanning and emailing the completed form to titleixcoordinator@newschool.edu.
    2. Email the Title IX Coordinator: The Title IX Coordinator is the person designated by the university to monitor and ensure compliance by the university with Title IX.    
    3. Speak with a university Confidential Employee
      • A Confidential Employee is

        (1) Any university employee who is a licensed medical, clinical, or mental-health professional (e.g., physicians, nurses, physicians’ assistants, psychologists, psychiatrists, professional counselors and social workers, and those performing services under their supervision), when acting in his or her professional role in the provision of services to a patient who is a university student (“health care providers”), and (2) any university employee providing administrative, operational, and/or related support for such healthcare providers in their performance of such services. A Confidential Employee will not report information to the university’s Title IX Coordinator (or anyone else) without permission from the person who disclosed that information.
    4. Speak with a university Responsible Employee
      • A Responsible Employee is

        required to report to the university’s Title IX Coordinator all relevant details about an incident—including the names of the parties, any witnesses, and any other relevant details (e.g., the date, time, and specific location of the alleged incident)—that have been disclosed by a student to the Responsible Employee. Responsible Employees fulfill their reporting obligations by reporting such information through this secure online reporting system.
    5. Contact the Senior Vice President for Human Resources and Labor Relations
      • Carol Cantrell is the Senior Vice President for Human Resources and Labor Relations and may receive reports of allegations that involve employees of the university. Employees include but are not limited to full-time faculty, part-time faculty, and administrative staff.

    Investigation Process Overview

    Following the receipt of an incident report, the Title IX Coordinator or designee will take the following steps:

    1. Immediate remedial actions to ensure the safety and well-being of victims if appropriate in the given circumstances.
    2. Initiate an investigation into the allegations, including speaking with witnesses and following up on relevant details.
    3. If the accused party is found in violation of university policy, they will be notified of their charges.
    4. The findings of this investigation will be presented to (1) the relevant administrator in situations involving faculty and staff or (2) a hearing panel in situations involving students.
    5. The involved parties will be made aware of the outcome of the investigation or hearing
    6. For students, after the outcome is decided either party can decide to appeal the decision
      • If an appeal is filed, the appeal will be heard by the designee
    7. The final outcome will be reported to relevant parties

    For a more detailed account of the disciplinary process see

    For additional resources

    On-Campus Support Services

    The New School is committed to supporting victims of violent, abusive, or intimidating behavior by providing the following support services.

    Student Health Services

    80 Fifth Avenue, 3rd floor 
    New York, NY 10011
    212.229.1671
    SHS@newschool.edu

    Student Support and Crisis Management

    72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor 
    212.229.5900 x3189 or x3710 
    Studentsupport@newschool.edu

    Student Rights and Responsibilities

    72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor 
    212.229.5349
    SRR@newschool.edu

    Campus Security

    55 West 13th Street, mezzanine level 
    212.229.7001 (24 hours) 
    ilicitot@newschool.edu

    Human Resources (if the allegations involve an employee)

    79 Fifth Avenue, 18th floor
    212.229.5671  
    cantrellc@newschool.edu

    Employee Assistance Program

    888.293.6948 (24 hours)

    Local Support Services

    In addition to on-campus support services, the following local support services are available

    New York City Domestic Violence Hotline

    dial 311 
    24 hours per day, 7 days per week

    New York State Domestic Violence Hotline

    1.800.942.6906 
    24 hours per day, 7 days per week 

    New York City Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project

    212.714.1141 
    24 hours per day, 7 days per week

    Safe Horizons

    • 866.689.HELP (4357) Crime Victims' Hotline
    • 800.621.HOPE (4673) Domestic Violence Hotline
    • 212.227.3000 Sexual Assault Hotline 
    • www.safehorizon.org  
    • St. Luke’s Roosevelt Crime Victims Treatment Center 
    • www.cvtc-slr.org

    Midtown Office

    432 West 58th Street, ground floor 
    New York, NY 10019
    212.523.8200 

    Uptown Office

    411 West 114 Street, suite 2C 
    New York, NY 10025 
    212.523.4728

  • Information for Victims

    Definitions

  • What is Sexual Misconduct?

    The New School Sexual Misconduct and Violence Policy defines sexual assault as nonconsensual sexual intercourse (defined as sexual assault), sexual contact, or sexual exploitation. If you are forced, coerced, or intimidated to submit to any kind of sex act, including unwanted touching of your or another person’s intimate body parts, it is sexual assault. If you are asleep, unconscious, or incapacitated by drugs or alcohol, you are considered unable to consent to sexual activity. If someone commits any sex act upon you when you are unable to consent, it is also sexual assault. These behaviors are a serious violation of the New School Sexual Misconduct and Violence Policy and are against the law in New York State. Check out the full New School Sexual Misconduct and Violence Policy (PDF).

    What is Consent?

    The presence of consent involves explicit communications and mutual approval for the act in which the parties are/were involved. A sexual encounter is considered consensual when individuals willingly and knowingly engage in sexual activity. Consent can be revoked at any time for any reason. Consent is active, not passive, and is required regardless of whether the person initiating the act is under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. Consent must be given for every act and for every time that the act occurs, regardless of a previous history of consensual sexual activity between the parties or other past behaviors with other individual(s). Consent may be initially given but may be withdrawn at any time. When consent is withdrawn or can no longer be given, sexual activity must stop. In order to give effective consent in New York State, one must be of legal age (17 years old). 

    Consent cannot be procured by use of pressure, manipulation, compelling threats, intimidating behavior, substances, and/or force. Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated, i.e., when an individual lacks the ability to knowingly choose to participate in sexual activity. Incapacitation may be caused by the lack of consciousness or being asleep, being involuntarily restrained, or if an individual otherwise cannot consent. Depending on the degree of intoxication, someone under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other intoxicants may be incapacitated and therefore unable to give consent. 

     

    Take a few minutes to watch this video for a better understanding of consent.

    What is Sexual Harassment?

    The university prohibits sexual harassment of any member of the university community, whether such harassment is aimed at students, faculty, or other employees. Based upon the EEOC guidelines, and for the purposes of this policy, sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other expressive or physical conduct of a sexual nature, where

    • submission to such conduct is explicitly or implicitly made a term or condition of employment or status in a course, program, or activity; or
    • submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for an employment or academic decision affecting the individual, or for a decision regarding an individual's status in a course, program, or activity; or
    • such conduct has the purpose or effect, when judged from the perspective of a reasonable person in the position of the complaining individual, of substantially interfering with an individual's academic or work performance, or with an individual's enjoyment of other university opportunities, programs, and activities; or
    • such conduct has the purpose or effect, when judged from the perspective of a reasonable person in the position of the complaining individual, of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for working, learning, or enjoying other university opportunities, programs, and activities.

    What is Dating and Domestic Violence?

    Dating violence is violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social, romantic, or intimate relationship with the victim. Domestic violence is violence committed by a current or former spouse, an intimate partner, a person who shares a child with the victim, or a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim.

    Dating and domestic violence includes but is not limited to

    • Threats
    • Physical abuse
    • Psychological abuse
    • Sexual abuse
    • Forced isolation from family and friends
    • Withholding of finances
    • Preventing access to resources

     

    What is Stalking?

    Stalking is a course of unwanted conduct which causes the targeted person to fear for their personal safety and sometimes for the safety of those close to them. Stalking has a negative impact on the victim’s sense of security and emotional health. 

    Stalking behavior includes but is not necessarily limited to

    • Persistent, unwanted contact such as unwanted texts, emails, or phone calls
    • Showing up unwanted at a person’s home, school, or job
    • Sending unwanted gifts, cards, or letters
    • Unwanted posting or presence on social networking sites
    • Unwanted contact with victim’s friends, family, classmates, or co-workers

     

  • The Importance of Medical Care

    You have the option of going to a hospital emergency room for medical care. This is especially important if it is within 96 hours of the assault. To preserve the evidence, it is best not to shower, wash, douche, eat, or drink fluids, if possible. Carry evidence in a clean paper bag. If it is more than 96 hours after the assault, it is still recommended that you receive medical care, but you will not have available all the options discussed below. You have the right to refuse any or all parts of the treatment/evidence collection. 

    Medical care following a sexual assault includes

    • a physical exam to check any internal or external injuries
    • evidence collection (if presenting within 96 hours of the assault)
    • preventive treatment for sexually transmitted infections
    • preventive treatment for HIV (as soon as possible and up to 36 hours)
    • emergency contraception (as soon as possible and up to 120 hours)
    • medical follow-up referrals and information
  • About Reporting

    Going to a hospital emergency room does not mean you have to report the crime to the police. You can go to the emergency room and get medical attention/evidence collection and then take some time to think about whether you want to report the crime to the police. The hospital emergency room is required to store the evidence for 30 days. If you do not want medical care from a hospital emergency room, it is still encouraged you seek medical attention. You can see your private medical provider or visit Medical Services, where you may feel more comfortable. Just note that you will not have available all the options stated above, especially evidence collection. Federal law requires forensic exams (evidence collection) be conducted for free regardless of your decision to report the incident to the police or not. 

    It is recommended that you go for medical care at one of the hospitals listed below. These hospitals have rape crisis programs and have trained advocates available 24 hours. The advocates will provide emotional support and information and help with the police reporting process.

    Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital Emergency Department

    16th Street at 1st Avenue 
    212.420.2000

    OR 

    Mount Sinai Roosevelt Hospital Emergency Department

    Tenth Avenue at 59th Street 
    212.523.4000

    Learn more about the evidence collection procedures.

    Emotions and Concerns

    As a survivor of sexual violence you may experience a wide range of emotional reactions, and the decision to report the assault and/or seek help is a very personal and complex one. It is encouraged that you seek support as soon as you are ready. Reactions can vary and may include shock, denial, anxiety, guilt, anger, and self-blame, as well as nightmares, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, flashbacks, and depression. You may want to seek professional, confidential assistance either on campus at Counseling Services (80 Fifth Avenue, 3rd floor) or off campus at a local rape crisis center

    Legal Options

    Reporting to the Police

    In addition to your right to report incidents of sexual assault to the university, you have the right to pursue criminal prosecution and/or civil litigation. Prompt reporting and a comprehensive medical examination completed at a hospital emergency department within 96 hours of the assault will aid the legal process. You can go to the precinct corresponding to the area where the crime occurred or call the New York Police Department Special Victims Report Line at 646.610.7272. The hotline provides the option of getting some information without having to disclose your name. With that information you can then decide whether to go forward with the reporting process.

    Please note: You should never be pressured to file a report. It is your decision to report unless there is an injury by a deadly weapon, when medical staff only are mandated to report the crime to the police. In addition, reporting sexual violence to the police does not obligate you to file criminal charges or pursue other legal action. In the case of sexual violence, however, Student Support and Crisis Management is available to provide support and advocacy throughout this process as needed.

    Confidential Disclosure on Campus Regarding Sexual Violence

    Students who want to talk with a staff person about an incident of sexual violence and maintain strict confidentiality can speak with a confidential staff person at Student Health Services on campus.

    However, a Responsible Employee is required to report to the university’s Title IX Coordinator all relevant details about an incident—including the names of the parties, any witnesses, and any other relevant details (e.g., the date, time, and specific location of the alleged incident)—that have been disclosed by a student to the Responsible Employee. Responsible Employees fulfill their reporting obligations by reporting such information through the secure online reporting system. Responsible Employees are all university employees who do not serve as medical or counseling professionals.

    Where to Report

    Reporting Sexual Misconduct on Campus

    If you have experienced any form of sexual misconduct, you are encouraged to report it by email, phone, or in person to any of the following university offices: 

    Title IX Coordinator

    72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor 
    212.229.5900 x3656
    Titleixcoordinator@newschool.edu
    Jennifer Francone, Assistant Vice President for Student Life 

    Campus Security

    68 Fifth Avenue, mezzanine level 
    212.229.7001 (24 hours)
    ilicetot@newschool.edu

    Tom Iliceto, Director

    Student Support and Crisis Management

    72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor 
    212.229.5900 x3189
    studentsupport@newschool.edu

    Maureen Sheridan, Director

    Once a report is filed, the university official receiving the report or another appropriate official will provide the following information to you:

    • Clear explanation of the university investigative and hearing procedures
    • Where to access medical care
    • Information about legal options
    • Where to access support services on and off campus

    Other Resources

    The New School Resources

    Campus Security: 212.229.7001 (24 hours)
    Student Health Services: 212.229.1671
    Student Support and Crisis Management: 212.229.5900 x3189
    Student Rights and Responsibilities: 212.229.5900 x3656

    Hotlines – 24 Hours

    Safe Horizon Emergency Hotline: 800.621.4673
    RAINN Online Hotline: ohl.rainn.org/online
    NYC LGBTQ Anti-Violence Project (AVP): 212.714.1141
    Suicide Prevention (LifeNet): 800.543.3638
    New York Asian Women’s Center: 888.888.7702

    Advocacy and Counseling Services for Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, and Stalking

    St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Crime Victims Treatment Center
    411 West 114th Street
    212.523.4728
    www.cvtc-slr.org

    Mt. Sinai Beth Israel Rape Crisis and Domestic Violence

    Intervention Program
    317 East 17th Street
    212.420.4054

    New York City – 24 Hours

    Police and Emergency Medical Services: Dial 911 
    NYPD Special Victims Liaison Unit Report Line: 212.267.7273 

    LGBTQIAGNC Resources

    NYC LGBTQ Anti-Violence Project (AVP): 212.714.1184
    www.avp.org

    Other

    New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault: 212.229.0345
    New York State Office of Victim Services: 800.247.8035

  • University Policies

    Sexual Harassment

    Conduct that exploits power or authority in order to elicit sexual submission, or inappropriate sexual conduct that creates an intimidating, hostile, or abusive environment for working, learning, or enjoying other opportunities and activities. The New School policy on sexual harassment policy is located here.

    Consent

    Yes Means Yes - A definition of consent in which the presence of consent involves explicit communications and mutual approval for the act in which the parties are/were involved. A sexual encounter is considered consensual when individuals willingly and knowingly engage in sexual activity. The New School definition of consent is located here.

    Sexual Assault

    Non-consensual sexual intercourse or sexual contact, which includes any non-consensual oral, anal, or genital penetration with any object, by an individual or group upon an individual or group, without consent. The New School policy on sexual assault is located here.

    Intimate Partner Violence

    Physical violence, sexual violence, stalking and psychological aggression (including coercive acts) by a current or former intimate partner. The New School polict on Intimate Partner Violence Policy is located here.

    Stalking

    A course of unwanted conduct which causes the targeted person to fear for their personal safety and sometimes for the safety of those close to them. The New School policy on stalking is located here.

    Related Laws, Definitions, and Links

    “Know Your Rights” from the U.S. Department of Education

    “Enough is Enough” New York State Law

    The New School “Yes Means Yes” Campaign

    Jeanne Clery Act