Claire Potter | The New School for Public Engagement
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    Claire Potter

    Professor of History

    Ph.D., New York University (May, 1990)
    M.A. New York University (May, 1984)
    B.A., English, Yale University (May, 1980)

    Now in her third decade of teaching history at the university level, Claire Potter joined the New School for Public Engagement in 2012. She is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers, 1998) and co-editor of Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012.) She teaches courses in social sciences and humanities in the School of Undergraduate Studies and is also a member of the university history department.

    Claire is part of "Democratizing the Archive," a NSPE faculty collective dedicated to designing courses that expand the use of public manuscript collections, linking students to communities through activist research and digital scholarship. A member of the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Sexuality and co-editor, with Renee Romano, of the University of Georgia Press series "Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America," she is currently working on a book about the politics of anti-pornography campaigns in the late twentieth century United States.

    Claire blogs at Tenured Radical, located at the Chronicle of Higher Education, since 2011. You can find out more about her, and read some of her work, at her website.

    Courses Taught

    Foundations of Gender Studies
    Introduction to Cultural Analysis
    The Age of Reagan
    Violence and American Identity
    The Sexual Revolution
    New York City Activists and Their Worlds: 1968-2000

    Recent Publications

    Co-edited with Renee Romano, Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012.)
    “Taking Back Times Square: Feminist Repertoires and the Transformation of Urban Space In Late Second Wave Feminism,” Andy Urban and Amy Tyson, Eds. Radical History Review special issue “Calling the Law Into Question,” issue 113 (spring 2012).
    “Paths to Political Citizenship: Feminism, Gay Rights and the Carter Presidency,” Special Issue on Gender, Eileen Boris, Ed., Journal of Policy History (winter 2011-12), 95-114.
    “Because It Is Gone Now: Teaching The September 11 Digital Archive,” OAH Magazine of History v. 25 no. 3 (Summer 2011), 31-34.
    “Women Gone Wild: An Introduction to Feminist Blogging,” introductory essay for a roundtable edited for Journal of Women’s History vol. 22 no. 4 (winter, 2010), 185-189.
    “Queer Hoover: Sex, Lies and Political History,” Journal of the History of Sexuality, vol. 15 no. 3 (September 2006), pp. 355-381. Awarded the 2007-08 Audre Lorde article prize by the Committee on Lesbian and Gay History (American Historical Association affiliate society).

    Research Interests

     Political history, queer studies, the history of gender and feminism, and the digital public sphere.

    Professional Affiliations

    Organization of American Historians
    Berkshire Conference of Women Historians
    American Studies Association
    American Historical Association
    Lifetime member, Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender History
    American Association of University Professors
    Committee on Lesbian and Gay Studies, CUNY

    Recent Presentations/Exhibits

     “Virtually a Scholar: Academic Labor in the Age of Unemployment,” Department of American Culture University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, February 14 2012.
    “Sexual Revolutions: Pornography and Politics in the Age of Reagan,” Yale University Department of History and the Program in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, New Haven, CT, October 23, 2008.

    Competitions and Appearances

     “A Blog of Her Own: Scholarly Women On The Web,” panel participant at Columbia University (co-sponsored by the Columbia University Libraries Scholarly Communication Program and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, September 21, 2009. Can be viewed on-line at http://scholcom.columbia.edu/blog-ones-own-scholarly-women-web (last accessed August 11, 2011.)
    “Red, Blue or Purple?” Political commenter for The Dylan Rattigan Show with Cenk Uygur, MSNBC, August 8 2010.

    Awards and Honors

    2007-08 Audre Lorde article prize by the Committee on Lesbian and Gay History (American Historical Association affiliate society) – see above.
    Cliopatria award for Best History Blog Post, 2008 for “What Would Natalie Zemon Davis Do?” June 19 2008 (http://bit.ly/hsawew).
    Albert J. Beveridge Research Grant, American Historical Association, 1988

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