Parsons

  • OVERVIEW

    The Creative Coding minor provides a hands-on opportunity to explore the making of code-based interactions for the creative fields. In this minor, students build art and design projects that are critically engaging, socially aware experiences making use of various media, programming languages, and technologies. In studio and seminar courses, students investigate the aims and historical contexts of technical work in the creative fields; the concepts, media, and techniques used; and solutions to creative problems using software and hardware. Students prototype and iterate with code using various forms of inputs/outputs, sensory information, environmental conditions, and emotive responses. Students can explore varieties of scale, form, and style — from issues of privacy and socially responsible approaches to urban landscapes and large-scale immersive environments.

    The Creative Coding minor draws upon academic offerings and faculty knowledge across the university but has a particular affinity with AMT’s Design and Technology programming and, of course, studio practice across Parsons in general. This is evidenced in the subject areas of Studio Practice/Iterative Creative Process and Making with Code.

    The Creative Coding minor requires successful completion of 18 credits across four subject areas, as outlined in the curriculum chart below.

    Note: Students majoring in Design + Technology with a track in Creative Technologies are restricted from pursuing this minor.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    A student who has completed this minor should be able to demonstrate:

    • Understanding of the various historical contexts of creative technology, choosing a context to work within, and applying approaches and techniques relevant to that context.
    • Understanding of basic design knowledge, history, research principles, concepts, media, and formats for an interactive project
    • Competence in prototyping and iterating with various forms of software and hardware used in creative technology and applying them in a critically engaging way using interaction design principles
    • Competence in forming creative questions as well as building and presenting engaging technical responses that are critical in nature and provide a unique perspective on the chosen subject matter
    • Competence in using code as a method of creative expression in interactive projects, ranging from educational platforms to experimental installations
    • Understanding of the intrinsic relationship between physical, analog environments and digital experiences

    Curriculum

    Subject Area Course Options Requirements
    Theory and Precedent Courses
    • PLDS 2190: History of Design: 1850–Pres: Lecture /
      PLDS 2191: History of Design: 1850–Pres: Recitation
    • PLVS 3023: Graphic Design
    • LCST 2219: The Digital Work Notebook (summer course)

      This course is an intensive creative exploration of emerging forms of digital work in New York City. We visit companies like Tumblr, Mozilla, or Google and also co-working spaces and other novel work environments. We take photographs, interview workers, and jointly create a book of images, cartoons, and texts about labor in the age of communicative capitalism. During our seminar-style meetings, we reflect on waged and unwaged forms of work. In particular, we compare free public-spirited labor, work in the "creative industries," unpaid internships, and exploitative labor practices, online. In our discussions, informed by artists like Alex Rivera and Burak Arikan as well as theorists such as Maurizio Lazzarrato, Cory Doctorow, and Arlie Hochschild, we establish what we mean by labor and work, and determine whether those definitions are in harmony with the realities of contemporary digital work environments such as Amazon Mechanical Turk or 99Designs. We also explore the history of labor struggles and new forms of solidarity and mutual aid in the face of distributed labor. After successful completion of the course, all participants receive a copy of the printed book.

    • LINA 3006: Creative Algorithms

      Some of the most compelling, playful, and subversive artworks of the last 50 years can be said to be algorithmic: generated by a process that outputs a result based on clearly defined rules and instructions. This interdisciplinary course explores how and why some artists have abandoned traditional expressive means in favor of this procedural approach. Students closely consider artists’ works and writings in all media, including Sol Lewitt’s wall drawings, Brian Eno’s generative music, Alison Knowles’ Fluxus event scores, William Forsythe’s dance improvisation technologies, Raymond Queneau’s combinatory poetry, and the Critical Art Ensemble’s tactical media interventions. In parallel with discussing artworks, students read key writings in media theory, art criticism, and technology in order to generate questions about artistic subjectivity in digital culture, the politics of interactivity, the meaning of chance, and the productive relations between theory and art practice. Previous coursework in philosophy or critical theory is helpful but not required.

    3 credits
    Studio Practice/ Iterative Creative Process

    0–3 credits

    * Students who have already completed one of these courses, or will do so for their major, should instead select another course in the subject area "Making with Code."

    Making with Code
    • PSAM 1028: Web Design Basics
    • PSAM 2120: Web: Interaction
    • PSAM 3120: Web Advanced: Javascript

      This course addresses designing experiences for mobile and tablet devices. We delve into the nuances of designing for and with touch screens and diverse mobile platforms and discover how context of use should influence the information architecture. Finally we explore how sketching, storyboarding, and prototyping can be both processes for testing our ideas and tools communicate these ideas to others.

    • PSAM 3120: Web Advanced: Designing for Touch

      This course addresses designing experiences for mobile and tablet devices. We delve into the nuances of designing for and with touch screens and diverse mobile platforms and discover how context of use should influence the information architecture. Finally we explore how sketching, storyboarding, and prototyping can be both processes for testing our ideas and tools communicate these ideas to others.

    • PUCD 2035: Creative Computing
    • PUDT 2110: Code 1
    • PUDT 2112: Code 2

    6-9 credits

    * ADHT faculty advisor permission required.

    Beyond the Screen Up to 6 credits

    ELIGIBILITY

    Minors are available to undergraduate students across The New School except those students at Lang and in the Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students who are completing a self-designed BA or BS in Liberal Arts, who are not permitted to declare minors. For students at Lang or in the Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students who are interested in pursuing deeper study of this subject area, opportunities are available through the self-designed major in Liberal Arts. To explore this option, contact an academic advisor or read more information about self-designed options for Lang or the Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students.
    For questions regarding this minor’s curriculum, including requests for course substitutions, please contact Brendan Griffiths, assistant professor, at griffitb@newschool.edu.

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