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    Department of Politics
    The New School for Social Research
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    New York, NY 10003
    Phone: 212.229.5747 x3090
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Hire a PhD Candidate

  • Nathan Angelo

    Expected Completion
    April 2014

    Curriculum vitae (PDF)

    Major Field
    American Politics

    Minor Field
    Political Theory

    Dissertation Title
    "Racial and Ethnic Strategy in Presidential Election Year Rhetoric, 1964-2004"

    Dissertation Committee
    Victoria Hattam (chair), David Plotke, Deva Woodly

    Dissertation Abstract
    My dissertation analyzes presidential rhetoric from 1964 to 2004 to show how presidents have come to use ethnic rhetoric to justify subtly coded racial appeals and sidestep issues of racial inequality. It uses a mixed methods analysis of seventeen election-year volumes of the Public Papers of the Presidents to track when and how presidents integrated the term “ethnic” into their speeches. My research shows how direct discussions of racial inequality have dropped out of presidential speeches in favor of coded appeals on crime, welfare, and education that presidents consistently justified with reference to values that unite ethnically diverse supporters. This strategy allows presidents to draw on racial resentments, frame these appeals with egalitarian messages, and claim to be sensitive to issues of diversity. The approach employed in this dissertation allows us to view this rhetorical strategy’s reach across time and party to trace its growing acceptance as the dominant rhetorical strategy for presidents to address race, softening the focus on racial inequality through the lens of ethnicity.


    Profile

    Research Interests
    My research focuses on the American presidency, racial and ethnic politics, and political rhetoric. In my dissertation, I perform a mixed-method analysis of seventeen volumes of the Public Papers of the Presidents from 1964 to 2004 to show how Republican presidents established a framework for presidential speech about race that places ethnicity alongside race and focuses on how common values unite Americans despite their differences. I show how Republican presidents developed this framework to justify subtly coded racial appeals and sidestep issues of racial inequality, and how it has now become the dominant way for presidents from both parties to speak about race.

    I have presented this work at several conferences including the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting in September 2013, the Southern Political Science Association Annual Meeting in January 2013, and the Midwestern Political Science Association Annual Meeting in March of 2012. I have an article under review at Presidential Studies Quarterly that analyzes Nixon’s 1972 campaign rhetoric and shows how he used ethnic rhetoric to support his campaign strategy to harness the racial resentments of white ethnics. I am preparing a second manuscript for submission to Ethnic and Racial Studies titled “From South Africa to South Central: Framing Racial Transcendence through Foreign Policy Rhetoric” that analyzes the way that presidents frame American racial relations in their rhetoric on foreign policy. It shows that Nixon, Reagan, and Bush framed America as having transcended racism by comparing domestic American racial relations with Southern African racial tensions.

    My next project will assess the relationship between federal disaster response and Americans’ viewpoints of government. In this project, I will analyze federal government responses and rhetoric on those responses through content analysis of local and national media coverage and Federal Emergency Management Agency messages regarding HIV/AIDS, Sickle Cell Anemia, Hurricane Irene and Superstorm Sandy. I will survey community leaders in both affected and unaffected areas to determine if their perceptions of the federal government changed after the federal government’s response. This project will provide scholars with a better understanding of the political impacts of crisis management communication techniques.

    Teaching experience
    Power and the American Political System; Introduction to American Politics; Politics and Culture; The United States and the World;
    Democracy and Its Critics; Introduction to Political Theory; Contemporary Political Issues.

    Writing Samples
    Nathan-Angelo-writing-sample1_pdf

    Contact Information
    angeln32@newschool.edu

    Syllabi
    Nathan-Angelo-Syllabus_pdf (PDF)

    Cristina Dragomir

    Expected Completion
    October 2014

    Academia.edu Profile
    http://oswego.academia.edu/CristinaIoanaDragomir (PDF)

    Major Field
    American Politics

    Minor Field
    Political Theory

    Dissertation Title
    "Making the American Immigrant Soldier: Inclusion and Resistance"

    Dissertation Committee
    David Plotke (chair), Timothy Pachirat, Terry Williams, Aristide Zolberg (deceased)

    Dissertation Abstract

    This thesis describes the process of immigrants' naturalization via a powerful state institution, the U.S. military. It reveals how the immigrant soldiers participating in this study underwent the process of naturalization using diverse practices of both integration/assimilation and resistance. The study presents the life stories of three immigrants soldiers: Lily, an immigrant from Romania who serves in the Air Force; Alexa, an immigrant from Paraguay, who is an Army veteran; and Vinod, an Indian immigrant serving in the Army's active duty forces. Each life story shows why the participant in question joined the U.S. military, and to what extent did she/he became a full member of the military and host society. This study empowers us to understand the naturalization process from within, through the lived experiences of the immigrant soldiers who participated in this research.

    My work relies on several qualitative/interpretative methods: life stories, theoretical and historical analysis, ethnography and participant observation. As a result of this methodological approach, I unearthed three distinct discoveries. First, contrary to intuition, the three immigrant soldiers did not simply integrate or assimilate. They engaged in various seemingly contradictory practices of integration/assimilation and resistance in order to find a place for themselves in the host country. Second, the participants joined the American armed forces to obtain recognition of their identity and to access economic resources. Third, the contemporary institution of the U.S. military faces a set of divergent and competing demands for unity and diversity of its personnel, especially regarding foreign-born soldiers. Together, these discoveries portray a unique version of the immigrants' naturalization process.


    Profile

    Research Interests

    My research is in the field of American Politics, with a focus on immigration. My previous academic training, which I undertook at the New School for Social Research, drew from work in the areas of identity, multiculturalism and social justice in immigration studies. My dissertation was titled Making the American Immigrant Soldier: Inclusion and Resistance, and the Bucerius Fellowship - "Settling into Motion" supported its completion. It analyzed the patterns of naturalization that immigrants used while enlisted in the U.S. military. While studying the experiences of three immigrant soldiers this dissertation described the practices they conducted in order to find an equal place in their new country. Using ethnography, in-depth interviews, participant observation, and historical analysis, I argued that in order to acquire social justice immigrants employ a series of practices of integration/assimilation, alongside practices of resistance. For the past three years, I have been working on a project that furthers a comparative dimension. It is a research study on the struggle for justice of nomadic groups. It looks at how the nomadic Roma/Gypsies in the European Union and Southern India access social, political and economic justice. This qualitative, multidisciplinary research is titled The Quest for Social Justice: The case of the nomadic Roma/Gypsies in the EU and India. Through in-depth fieldwork, this project aims to answer the following question: How do nomadic populations, such as the Roma/Gypsy, acquire justice in nation states? Breaking away from the classic paradigm, which regards the Roma/Gypsy as a minority, this project looks at the Roma/Gypsy as a community present in various nation-states. I intend to transform the results of this research in a book manuscript by the end of 2016.

    Beginning in the academic year 2012 - 2013, which I spent at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute as a postdoctoral fellow, I have been developing my second research project. This project investigates the relevance of the concept of justice within the framework of American politics, particularly as this relates to current policies of border security and detention centers. I am interested in how local and state politics play out with respect to more general immigration policies. Particularly, I will analyze the U.S.'s strategies of immigration control that heavily emphasize border enforcement and detention centers. This research highlights the fine line between immigration and criminality, and explores the theoretical, policymaking underpinnings of the legal immigration system. In this regard, conducting field research in the Northeast region of the U.S. presents a great opportunity for exploring these issues. Work on this topic is also evident in my teaching endeavors, as I engaged with my students in projects on the politics of detention centers in the United States. This project is in its initial stages, and I plan to conduct research over the next year.

    I am currently working on transforming one of the life-stories from my doctoral dissertation into an article to be published in a peer review journal. This article titled From Being A Foreigner to Being a Soldier and an American, presents the life story of Lily, an immigrant soldier from Romania. Based on a five-year-long in-depth qualitative fieldwork, this article details Lily's journey of transformation via Air Force Reserve Service. It starts by showing Lily's life before military service, analyzes how her life in communist Romania, her experience of the anti-communist revolution, and her early years in an economic and socially broken system motivated her immigration to the United States, her stay, enlistment and life in the military.

    Teaching experience
    Intro to American Government; Interest Groups; Women in Politics; Gender and Membership; Politics of International Migration;
    Liberalism vs. Conservatism in American Political Thought; World Civilization I & II; Russia after 1917; American Conservative Political Thought;
    Intro to Political Theory; Modern Political Thought; Eastern European Politics and Government; Eastern European Politics through Art and Film, Liars; Truth Tellers and Hypocrites; Modern and Contemporary Philosophy

    Writing Samples
    Cristina-Dragomir-writing-sample1_pdf

    Teaching Statement

    I am an experienced and successful teacher. I have had the opportunity to teach diverse student population groups and understand the challenges of different audiences and types of courses. When teaching arts and design students in a required core curriculum course, I focused on improving reading and writing skills while using primary sources to engage them. While working as a teaching assistant for university-wide classes that included a combination of science and traditional liberal arts students, I used group activities to bridge the gap between students with different specializations and to create a shared sense of community in the classroom. The honors classes, which I taught for gifted undergraduate students, were focused on generating particularly challenging activities that would further develop their academic sophistication and excellence. In each instance, I have worked to create interdisciplinary courses that engaged students in contemporary community-based issues. Simultaneously, I strive to instill practical knowledge and to build the students' knowledge base and developed their repertoire of skills.

    My diverse teaching portfolio includes courses in Political Science, as well as in general Education, Philosophy and History. I truly enjoy teaching and I am dedicated to creating a stimulating and research-friendly environment, where students can explore their intellectual possibilities. Teaching "Oral History" and "Liberalism vs. Conservatism in American Politics" (in the U.S. and abroad) has been a central academic experience that has helped me to understand the political and philosophical bases of different political and cultural systems.

    Professional Experience

    -Event Coordinator, International Center for Migration, Ethnicity and Citizenship (Spring 2013). Organizing and coordinating events; contacting international scholars; publicizing the events; introducing presenters and facilitating conversations, furthering liaisons between members.

    -Student Liaison, Politics Department, New School for Social Research (2011- 2012). Advised prospective students; connected academic and administrative staff from different departments to prospective students. Organized meetings, participated at open-houses.

    -Research Assistant, Prof Aristide Zolberg, New School for Social Research (2009- 2012). Research for book manuscripts and articles about democratic management of minorities, immigration policies and their impact, citizenship in the era of globalization, and migration vs. immigration patterns in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

    -Research Assistant, Charney Research Institute, New York (2008- 2012). Conducted research on domestic and international politics for private, international and federal agencies. Topics of research: democratic development, international security issues, Middle-East politics, defense strategies, legal history, program implementation and evaluation. Created and organized rapports. Assisted with the organizing the data, organized database supporting research presentations.

    -Researcher, Hunter College, Political Science Department, New York (2007- 2008). Conducted comparative field research in Eastern Europe (Romania and former East Germany) on the process of democratization. Orchestrated research strategies, conducted field research, interview subjects, created analysis reports and organized database supporting class lectures.

    -Research Assistant, The New School, Parsons Gimbel Library, (2004- 2008). Assisted professors with teaching materials. Conducted on line and library research. Research and organized visual resources database.

    -Faculty Coordinator, Eugene Lang College, The New School. Assisted faculty with logistic and academic resources; connected academic and administrative staff from different departments. Conducted research and performed a wide variety of administrative tasks. Organized annual rapports.

    -Telephone Fundraiser, The New School for Social Research. Assist with transcribing interviews; created a data base. Analyzed fundraising materials and implemented fundraising techniques. Called prospects. Related friends to alumni. Closed gifts.

    -TV Program Host, Romanian Voice TV Program, New York (2004). Created and maintained relationships in the Romanian community. Researched and orchestrated cultural events, interviews and hosted a Romanian TV program. Researched, and edited copy for news presentations.

    -Interviewer and Researcher, National Sociological Institute “Metro-Media Transilvania,” Romania (1997- 1999). Conducted polling research. Utilized database. Transcribed interviews. Selected subjects. Conducted interviews. Organized and edited data.

    Contact Information
    crisdrag@gmail.com

    Adam Joyce

    Expected Completion
    May 2013

    Curriculum vitae (PDF)

    Academia.edu Profile
    adamjoyce.politics@gmail.com (PDF)

    Major Field
    American Politics

    Minor Field
    Comparative Politics

    Dissertation Title
    "The Politics of ‘the Army You Have’: Change and Continuity in the U.S. Military, 1972-2008"

    Dissertation Committee
    David Plotke (chair), Victoria Hattam, Edward Rhodes

    Dissertation Abstract
    What causes political institutions to transform? Engaging with literatures of American and comparative politics not generally used to analyze military organizations, I develop a micropolitical perspective on change. The core claim holds that the discourses and strategic efforts of mid-level agents play a central role in both maintaining order and effecting change. To test this argument, I compare U.S. Army development through four decades after the Vietnam War. I examine declassified documents, officers’ writings, and interviews to understand why and how mid-level officers changed their views of their missions. At times, as in the 1990s, this gradual process created a gap between the discourses of these officers and the Army’s favored way of war. In the subsequent decade, entrepreneurs inside the Army took advantage of the mismatch between the top and the middle and worked with outsiders to overhaul the Army’s paradigm. My account shows that even in a hierarchical institution like the Army, major change can be driven from the inside and from the middle. It holds promise for the study of institutions and policy regimes more generally.


    Profile

    Research Interests
    I am a historical institutionalist who works on continuity and change in institutions, policy regimes, and political cultures. My scholarship engages most closely with literatures of comparative historical analysis and American political development. I compare political phenomena over long periods to understand the forces that shape them, and to analyze whether those forces have changed. Within periods, my methods are historical and interpretive. I use archival sources and interviews to understand how agents create structures, how structures constrain agents, and how agents can reshape structures to achieve their goals. One future project will examine the shifts among conservatives in their ideas about American power projection. Another will analyze the strategies that the California Republican Party is using to become relevant in statewide politics.

    Teaching experience
    American Political Thought in Historical Perspective; 20th Century International Politics; Politics: The Foundations.

    Writing Samples
    Adam-Joyce-Writing-Sample1_pdf

    Contact Information
    adamjoyce.politics@gmail.com

    Syllabi
    Adam-Joyce-Syllabus1_pdf (PDF)

    Adrienne Stafford

    Expected Completion
    September 2013

    Curriculum vitae (PDF)

    Major Field
    Political Theory

    Minor Field
    Comparative Politics

    Dissertation Title
    "Representing the Economy: Economic Lifeworlds in Social and Political Theory"

    Dissertation Committee
    David Plotke (chair), William Milberg, Andreas Kalyvas, Kevin St. Martin

    Dissertation Abstract
    How does a progressive school of critical social thought represent the economy? How does critical social theory’s economic representations shape ideas about social justice? Like much social and political theory, critical social theory depicts a self-regulating marketcapitalist economy distinct if not separate from all moral, social, and cultural areas of our lives. I argue that this monistic representation of economy reproduces neoclassical economic ones that inadequately depict diverse economic practices and limit how we think about and enable social and economic justice. With composite data and cases, I show that the diverse economy is significantly constituted by noncapitalist and alternative-capitalist enterprises, unpaid and alternative-paid work, and nonmarket and alternative-markets that are also variously integrated with moral, social, and cultural values and aspects across numerous areas of our lives. I conclude that representing economic diversity in social and political theory is a more credible and critical economic account of our everyday economic lives for better enabling just social and economic practices.


    Profile

    Research Interests
    My interdisciplinary research brings together social philosophy, political theory, and political economy from feminist perspectives and concerns about social justice. I am especially interested in different meanings of economy, and how these meanings are represented in social and political theories. My current research aims to counter dominant representations of market capitalism in social and political theory with alternative representations of diverse economic practices. Expounding on composite data, cases, and quasi-fictional characters from my dissertation, I show that many noncapitalist, alternative-capitalist, nonmarket, and alternative-market economic practices are integrated with moral, social, and cultural elements and significantly form what I call economic lifeworlds. These economic lifeworlds include but are not limited to cooperatives, fairtrade networks, nonprofit organizations, socially responsible corporations, and household and non-household childrearing and eldercare. I regard this research as a lifelong project that entails further conceptual, qualitative (fieldwork), and quantitative research for extensively mapping out intersecting diverse economic spaces. These more credible representations of our everyday economic lives also guide how we think about and enable just social and economic practices.

    Teaching experience
    Modern Political Thought; American Government; Global Socioeconomic Perspectives (LIB); Cross-Cultural Perspectives (SOC);
    Cultural Anthropology; Gender and Politics (graduate course).

    Writing Samples
    Adrienne-Stafford-Writing-Sample1_pdf

    Contact Information
    stadrienne@gmail.com

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