Weekly Observer. June 21-July 6, 2010

ReSOURCE AND RE-IMAGINING OROZCO
PARSONS SUMMER EXHIBITIONS

This week, the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at Parsons celebrates the opening of two new exhibitions: ReSource (June 22-August 6), which highlights the winners of this year’s Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and Designers, and Re-Imagining Orozco (June 25-September 12), which explores the legacy of the university’s famed Orozco murals.

Featuring an exceptional group of projects from young architects and firms around the world, ReSource celebrates the winners of the 29th Annual Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and Designers. The annual prize was established to recognize works of high quality and encourage the exchange of ideas among young architects. To celebrate the opening of the exhibition, the Architectural League will present a discussion with exhibition participants on June 22 at 7:00 p.m. in the in the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Auditorium. ReSource will be on view in the Arnold and Sheila Aronson Galleries through August 6.

Coinciding with the Bicentennial of the Mexican Revolution, Re-Imagining Orozco features new work by visiting artist Enrique Chagoya as well as contributions from students and faculty from across the university that respond to Mexican artist Jose Clemente Orozco’s mural cycle, A Call to Revolution and Table of Universal Brotherhood, one of the most important pieces in the New School Art Collection. Chagoya, a Mexican-born American artist, will present new work that responds to the Orozco murals, the only public commissions by a Mexican muralist left in New York City. The exhibition is curated by New School Art Collection curators Silvia Rocciolo and Eric Stark. An opening reception will be held on June 24 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. in the Anna-Maria and Steven Kellen Gallery at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, where the exhibition will remain on view through September 12.

For more information on these exhibitions and their related programming, please visit www.newschool.edu/parsons/sjdc.

 

BARD OF SUMMER
DRAMA’S TYLER CAFFALL DEBUTS IN SHAKESPEARE’S WINTER AND MERCHANT

Pacino and Caffall in rehearsal
Photo by Nella Vera

When leading theater director Michael Greif attended The New School for Drama production of The Caucasian Chalk Circle last year, he was delighted with Tyler Caffall’s (’11) performance in the role of Azdak. Greif insisted that Caffall, who still had another year of study before formally entering the business, audition for the repertory company he would co-direct this summer at the Delacorte Theater. As Central Park audiences are now discovering, Caffall was triumphant and appears in both of this summer’s plays.

He will be performing in The Winter’s Tale, directed by Greif (Next to Normal, Grey Gardens, Rent) and The Merchant of Venice, directed by Daniel Sullivan (Rabbit Hole, Proof), starring Al Pacino. Caffall will also share the stage with other names familiar to New York theatergoers such as Linda Emond, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Lily Rabe, and Jesse L. Martin.

“This is really a wonderful opportunity for Tyler,” says Robert Hoyt, director of professional development at The New School for Drama. “Not only will he earn his first professional New York credit and work with these extraordinary artists, but this experience will jump start his career and get him noticed–and he’s still in school.”

Visit www.shakespeareinthepark.org for the complete schedule of performances and more information.



University News

WARREN BUFFETT PUTS IN HIS TWO CENTS
FEDERAL FINANCIAL CRISIS HEARING AT THE NEW SCHOOL

Television cameras were rolling at The New School on June 2 when the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission (FCIC) held a highly anticipated public hearing that featured Warren Buffett as the most prominent witness. The 10-member FCIC, created by Congress in 2009, is charged with examining the country's financial meltdown during 2007 and 2010.

New School President Bob Kerrey greeted the audience. “I welcome you to The New School, to New York City. And I congratulate and thank you for myself and, I hope, for other Americans as well for your willingness to tackle this problem.”

Buffett, chairman and chief executive officer of Berkshire Hathaway, along with Raymond W. McDaniel, chairman and chief executive officer at Moody’s Corporation, were subpoenaed by the FCIC to testify at the standing-room-only hearing, which focused on the credibility of credit ratings, the decisions based on those ratings, and the financial crisis.

The FCIC is examining the causes of the collapse of major financial institutions that failed, or would likely have failed, had they not received federal assistance. The hearing at The New School, which was televised live by C-SPAN, was part of a series of public hearings being held throughout the year.

 

BUILDING BRIDGES FOR A BRIGHTER FUTURE
MAYOR'S OFFICE SINGLES OUT THE NEW SCHOOL

For an expansive array of service in courses and outside the classroom, The New School was awarded “Special Recognition for Campus Mobilization” in the New York City College Challenge. The award was presented by the New York City Mayor’s Office for an unyielding commitment to civic engagement. The New School’s longstanding dedication to community, both local and global, is situated at the core of its culture.

The Mayor’s Office launched the College Challenge to encourage the city’s population of college students and faculty to generate meaningful social change in the community. In response to the challenge, a team from the academic divisions and the Office of Student Services collaborated on a portfolio highlighting the array of service programs and events at The New School.

The impressive collection boasts the work of 2,037 students in 130 courses and 89 activities that range from dance collaborations with grade-school students in Chelsea to (re)building the education system in New Orleans to spending winter break in Cambodia teaching conversational English to young adults at a Buddhist monastery.

 

TUESDAYS WITH THE STARS OF TOMORROW
PIER 45 AT CHRISTOPHER STREET

Summer in New York City means fewer crowds, a je ne sais quoi feel, and lots of free entertainment. New School students definitely contribute to that equation.

From Bach to Bebop on Tuesday nights, students from The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music and Mannes College The New School for Music perform at the Hudson River Park’s Pier 45 at Christopher Street. All-student performances begin at 6:30 p.m. The schedule is as follows:

  • June 22: Classical Woodwinds Trio
  • June 29: Darrel Smith Quartet
  • July 6: Classical Brass Trio
  • July 13: Sarah Elizabeth Charles Quintet
  • July 20: Classical Woodwinds Trio
  • July 27: Alon Albagli Quartet
  • August 3: Pyotr Gazarov Quartet
  • August 10: Classical Brass Trio
  • August 17: Classical Woodwinds Trio

 

NEWS FROM THE NEW SCHOOL FOR JAZZ AND CONTEMPORARY MUSIC

CELEBRATING 20
JAZZ DELEGATION HEADING TO THE HAGUE

A New School Jazz delegation led by Executive Director Martin Mueller will be traveling to the Hague, Netherlands for the 20th anniversary meeting of the International Association of Schools of Jazz (IASJ) from June 26 through July 2.

Mueller is a founding member of the IASJ, an organization comprised of more than 80 schools from 35 countries. Led by renowned saxophonist David Liebman, the IASJ promotes positive cross-cultural communication. In the past 19 years, more than 2,000 students, teachers, and representatives have participated in meetings in such varied cities as Dublin, Tel Aviv, New York (sponsored by The New School in 1994), Copenhagen, Helsinki, Krakow, Riga, Santiago de Compestela, and last year in Lucerne.

Faculty members Reggie Workman (bass), Rory Stuart (guitar), and students Melanie Charles (vocals) and Max Jaffee (drums) will join Mueller.

 

NEWS FROM MANNES COLLEGE THE University News

STRUMMING IN THE AMERICAS
NEW YORK GUITAR SEMINAR AT MANNES

The tenth New York Guitar Seminar at Mannes—The Cutting Edge: New Visions in the Art of Guitar—brings together an international faculty of renowned performers and teachers from July 7-11. Activities will include concerts, master classes, hands-on workshops, discussions, receptions, and performance opportunities for all participants, highlighting new ideas and approaches to the guitar and its literature.

Admission is $15. All Guitar Seminar events will take place at Mannes Concert Hall, 150 West 85th Street. For full detailed information on all master classes, workshops, lectures, concerts, sound clips, bios, and links to artists’ websites, please visit www.mannes.edu/guitar or call 212.580.0210 x4883.

The concert and lecture/demo schedule is as follows:
(* indicates premiere performance)

Concert Series

Wednesday, July 7, 7:30 p.m.
Program: New Perspectives: Music by Women around the World; music by Franghiz Ali-Zadeh* (Azerbaijan), Clarice Assad* (Brazil), Sofia Gubaidulina* (Tatarstan-Russian Federation), Marcela Pavia* (Italy-Argentina), Augusta Read Thomas (United States).
Artists: Clarice Assad, Duo46, Newman & Oltman Guitar Duo, and David Tanenbaum.

Thursday, July 8, 7:30 p.m.
Program: Extending Technique: New Instrumental Approaches; music by Jack Fortner,* Arthur Kampela, Michael Quell,* Terry Riley, John Schneider,* Ronald Bruce Smith,* and Peter Yates.
Artist: Duo 46, Arthur Kampela, John Schneider, and David Tanenbaum.

Friday, July 9, 7:30 p.m.
Program: The Modern Classics: Significant Works from the Late 20th century; music by Milton Babbitt, Elliott Carter, Mario Davidovsky, Lou Harrison, and Charles Wuorinen.
Artist: William Anderson, Jorge Caballero, Oren Fader, Dan Lippel, and John Schneider.

Saturday, July 10, 7:30 p.m.
Program: The New York Scene; music by Robert Beaser, Frantz Casséus, David Leisner, Shafer Mahoney, and Julia Crowe,*
Artists: Marco Cappelli, Arc Duo, Julia Crowe.

Lecture-Demo Series

Wednesday, July 7, 4:30 p.m., Artists: Stephen Aron*

Thursday, July 8, 4:30 p.m., Artist: Frank Wallace with Nancy Knowles, soprano (Duo Live Oak)

Friday, July 9, 4:30 p.m., Artist: Atanas Ourkouzounov* with Mie Ogura, flute

Saturday, July 10, 4:30 p.m., Artists: Andrew McKenna Lee with Kavak Trio (flute, viola, harp)

 

NEWS FROM EUGENE LANG COLLEGE THE NEW SCHOOL FOR LIBERAL ARTS

SUMMERING AT THE WHITE HOUSE
LANG STUDENT ADRIANE BROWN WINS PRESTIGIOUS INTERNSHIP

As internships go, it doesn’t get any better than this.

Preparing memos for Vice President Joe Biden and seeing the White House in motion are a few of the things with which Eugene Lang College student Adriane Brown is busy this summer.

The White House picked her as one of its participants in the highly selective 2010 White House Internship Program, which began in early-June and runs through August. Adriane is interning in the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Engagement in the Office of the Vice President.

“Even though it has only been a couple weeks, my daily tasks vary greatly. I've had the privilege of volunteering at exciting events like a press picnic at the vice president's residence... I often help prepare memos for the vice president and his staff for meetings or events they will be attending,” Adriane wrote in an email exchange from the White House.

What has been the most striking aspect of her experience in Washington so far?

“While I have seen unexpected and exciting occurrences during the first weeks of my internship, the most amazing in my experience is witnessing the work of the staffers. The people I work with on a daily basis are excited, accomplished, and wholeheartedly devoted to the mission of the administration. And many of them are young. It is really powerful to see a diverse group of people who are not much older than me do work that is incredibly important and oftentimes extremely difficult. It is inspiring.”

Brown joins students from Harvard, Columbia, and Yale, to name a few, who are honing their professional experiences and building leadership skills.

Adriane, a New Yorker, will be a senior this coming fall with a concentration in Social Inquiry. She has interned at the Huffington Post and with the Democratic National Convention Committee. The White House Internship Program seemed a natural next step.

Interns work in one of many White House departments ranging from the Office of Cabinet Affairs to the Office of the First Lady Michelle Obama.

For more information about the White House Internship Program, please visit: http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/internships.

 

NEWS FROM THE NEW SCHOOL FOR GENERAL STUDIES

FIRST COURSE
AMERICA'S ORIGINAL FOOD JOURNALIST CLEMENTINE PADDLEFORD


On Wednesday, June 23, at 6:00 p.m. the Food Studies Program at The New School presents a panel on Clementine Paddleford contributions and legacy as America’s first food journalist.

Paddleford was the first journalist to take food seriously. In her legendary columns for the New York Herald Tribune and This Week Magazine, she pioneered a smart, sassy reporting style that managed to elevate food writing from the dull formulas of home economists to must-read material. In 1953, Time magazine named her America’s “best-known food editor.” At the height of her career, Paddleford made a salary of $250,000—at the time an almost unheard of sum, especially for a woman.

This panel moderated by Andrew F. Smith, faculty member at The New School’s Food Studies Program and author of Eating History: 30 Turning Points in the Making of American Cuisine includes:

  • Kelly Alexander, former senior editor at Saveur and North Carolina-based author of the critically-acclaimed biography Hometown Appetites: The Story of Clementine Paddleford, the Forgotten Food Writer Who Chronicled How America Ate.

  • Betsy Wade, freelance journalist and author, whose newspaper career began at the Herald Tribune, where she worked in Women’s News with Clementine Paddleford.

  • Colman Andrews, former restaurant columnist at Gourmet magazine, who was the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Saveur.

  • Molly O’Neill, journalist and author of three award-winning cookbooks, a memoir, Mostly True, and editor the Library of America’s anthology American Food Writing.

Admission to this event in Wollman Hall, 65 West 11th Street, 5th floor, is $5; and free to all students and New School faculty, staff, and alumni with ID.

 

NEWS FROM MILANO THE NEW SCHOOL FOR MANAGEMENT AND URBAN POLICY

NANNY/MANNY RIGHTS NOW
LEGISLATIVE SUCCESS FOR TENENBAUM LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE STUDENT

The Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, which would be the nation’s first law to protect domestics like housekeepers and nannies, is currently progressing through New York’s State Legislature, thanks in large part to the work of Priscilla Gonzalez, a student of Milano’s Tenenbaum Leadership Institute.

Gonzalez is the founder and director of Domestic Workers United, which represents more than 3,000 domestic workers. Her group has been instrumental in pushing for the passage of the so-called “Nanny Bill,” which, according to the New York Times, “would require paid holidays, sick days and vacation days for domestic workers,” along with other benefits including overtime and two weeks termination notices. The bill has been passed by the State Senate and is now up for debate in the State Assembly.

To read the New York Times’ coverage of the Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, click here.

To read about Domestic Workers Union’s work the bill, click here.

 

BARELY PASSING
CNYCA REPORT FINDS MAJOR FLAWS IN NYC SCHOOL ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM

On June 16, Milano’s Center for New York City Affairs released “Managing by the Numbers: Empowerment and Accountability in New York City’s Schools,” one of the first broad studies of the public school accountability system put in place by New York City Schools Chancellor Joel Klein in 2007. Under Klein’s leadership, principals have been given direct control over their schools, and are held accountable to school-wide standardized test results.

The study found that while principals’ new freedom have resulted in affirming turnarounds for many formerly failing schools, the new system has serious flaws, failing to realistically track schools’ improvements, and depriving new principals of needed support. Based on their findings, CNYCA offered a list of key fixes for schools, including abandoning oversimplified, single-letter grades for each school, and subjecting standardized test to rigorous psychometric evaluations.

Senior Editor and report co-author Clara Hemphill and CNYCA Director Andrew White detailed the report’s findings at Putting Principals to the Test, a CNYCA event held on June 16 in Tishman Auditorium. Hemphill and White’s presentation was followed by a panel discussion featuring Merryl Tisch, chancellor of the New York State Board of Regents; Shael Polakow-Suransky, deputy chancellor for Performance and Accountability, NYC Department of Education, and others.

To download the report in full, click here.


NEWS FROM PARSONS THE NEW SCHOOL FOR DESIGN

MAKING IT A PARSONS TRADITION
STUDENTS WIN CFDA AWARDS (AGAIN)

Four Parsons Fashion students received coveted Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) student scholarships, announced at this year’s CFDA Awards ceremony on June 7 at Lincoln Center.

Carmen Chen Wu was awarded the $25,000 Geoffrey Beene Design Scholarship, the top student design honor, while Yuen Chi Lo and Lauren Burnet each received $10,000 CFDA Scholarships. Paul Negron was also recognized with an Honorable Mention CFDA Scholarship.

Students from across the country submitted applications, which were judged by a panel of industry experts that included Kim Hastreiter, Russell Nardozza, Doo-Ri Chung, Maria Cornejo, Richard Lambertson, and Anna Sui. This year’s recipients join a storied list of talented young Parsons alumni to receive the honors, including Peter Som (1996), Jack McCollough (2001) of Proenza Schouler, and Chris Benz (2003).

A nonprofit trade association of America’s foremost fashion and accessory designers, the CFDA promotes fashion design as an American cultural force. Dedicated to nurturing talented young designers, the CFDA awards yearly scholarships totaling $130,000 that fund fashion design education. For more information, please visit www.cfda.org.

 

NEWS FROM Student Services

RENOVATING THE CHEYENNE REZ:
NEW SCHOOL STUDENTS INSULATE 25 HOMES

This May a New School team of 11 students and three staff members spent a week in Eagle Butte, South Dakota refurbishing existing Habitat for Humanity homes to make them more energy efficient. The students, representing five divisions of The New School, reinsulated the attics of an entire neighborhood of houses, which will cumulatively save thousands of dollars in heating and cooling costs for the homeowners.

“Being in this year’s Habitat for Humanity trip allowed me to see things from a different point of view,” said Lang student Julia Ramirez. “I am happy because I now understand that the time and effort we put into all the installation work will pay off. It will all show when the families we helped will save money on their electricity bills in the coming summers and winters.”

Students were also treated to a full of week of cultural activities by the Okiciyapi Tipi Habitat for Humanity affiliate and Cheyenne River Tribe. Activities included a dinner with a local storyteller, participation in a sweat lodge, a tour of the tribe’s expansive buffalo herd, and a visit to a local museum. On the way to Eagle Butte, students also were able to visit Mount Rushmore, Devils Tower in Wyoming, and Badlands National Park.

For the 2010-11 academic year, the Office of Student Development and Activities (OSDA) will be expanding service trip options available for students. Please contact OSDA at leadandserve@newschool.edu with your suggestions and for more information.

 

UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

DISCOUNTS FOR NEW SCHOOL FACULTY, STUDENTS AND STAFF

Discounts for all New School employees can be found on MyNewSchool. Login and click on the employee tab and then under the Human Resources section click on “Discounts for Employees of The New School.”

Discounts for all students can be found in the New York City Resources section of the Student Handbook.

 


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