Weekly Observer. July 27-August 9, 2009

DR. CHICO HAMILTON TO PERFORM FROM LATEST CD AT DIZZY’S CLUB COCA COLA

Eighty-seven-year-old NEA Jazz Master, band leader, percussionist, and New School Jazz faculty member Dr. Chico Hamilton returns to Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola on Tuesday, August 18, at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. to perform works from his latest CD, Twelve Tones of Love.

Hamilton, considered one of the most important living jazz artists and composers, will lead his is quintet Euphoria, which includes Paul Ramsey on bass, New School Jazz alumnus Evan Schwam on sax, Jeremy Carlstedt on percussion, and Jeremy Wilms on guitar. To view a video trailer and listen to tracks from Twelve Tones of Love, visit Hamilton’s website.

Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola is located at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall, Broadway at West 60th Street. Admission this night is $30, with a $10 food/drink minimum at a table, $5 at the bar. Student discount of $15 admission for 9:30pm set with applicable food/drink minimums. To make reservations, call 212.258.9595 or visit the website.


NEW SCHOOL ALUMNI RECEIVE FULBRIGHT AWARDS

Ida C. Benedetto (2009), a BAFA Lang / Parsons alumna, and Alexandra Mendez-Diez (2006) and Sunera Taikaram (2008), both New School for General Studies alumni, have all been awarded Fulbright U.S. Student Scholarships.

Benedetto, who earned a BFA in Design and Technology and a BA in History will work on a project titled, “Sudden Flowers: A Case Study of New Media and Visual Culture for Human Rights” in Ethiopia. Mendez-Diez’s who earned a MFA in Creative Writing Poetry will work on a project titled, “In Search of Lunita Laredo” in Spain. Taikaram, who earned an MA in International Affairs will be traveling to Barbados where she’ll be working on a project titled, “Assessing Community-Based Disaster Management in Barbados.” These New School alumni are among the more than 1,450 American citizens traveling abroad for the 2009-10 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program.

The Fulbright Program, America’s flagship international-educational exchange program, is sponsored by the United States Department of State and the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Since its establishment in 1946, under legislation introduced by the late Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the Fulbright Program has funded approximately 286,500 Americans to study, teach, or research abroad, and 178,340 students, scholars, and teachers from other countries to engage in similar activities in the United States. The program operates in over 155 countries.



University News

CONVOCATION TO BE HELD SEPTEMBER 3

New School students, faculty, and staff are invited to mark the opening of the 2009-2010 academic year at the Convocation Ceremony. The ceremony will take place on Thursday, September 3, 3:00 p.m., in Tishman Auditorium, 66 West 12th Street. The program includes a welcome from President Bob Kerrey and University Student Senate President Tushar Gogia, remarks by Provost Tim Marshall, and presentation of the Distinguished University Teaching Awards. Julia Foulkes, associate professor of history at The New School for General Studies, will give this year’s Aims of Education Address.

The 2009 Distinguished University Teaching Awards will be presented to Jinsook Erin Cho, Parsons The New School for Design; Lisa R. Rubin, The New School for Social Research and The New School for General Studies; Susan Shapiro, The New School for General Studies; and Mary R. Watson, Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy.

The 13th Annual Welcome Block Party, on West 12th Street, will immediately follow the ceremony.

Updated information on this year’s Convocation is available on the university’s website.


NEWS FROM THE NEW SCHOOL FOR JAZZ AND CONTEMPORARY MUSIC

JAZZ STUDENT FINALIST IN VOCAL COMPETITION

New School Jazz student, vocalist Brianna Thomas has been selected as one of the six finalists for the Sixth Annual Jazzmobile Vocal Competition.

The finalists will perform on Monday, July 27, at Harlem’s Alhambra Ballroom, 2116 Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard, to compete for the 2009 Best of the Best Jazz Vocalist title. Winners are selected by a panel of professional judges that in past years have included master jazz pianist, educator, composer, and Jazzmobile founder Dr. Billy Taylor; drummer, bandleader, and composer T.S. Monk; and jazz singer and educator Gloria Lynne.

Jazzmobile, Inc., the oldest jazz nonprofit in the country, was founded in 1964 by Dr. Taylor and Daphne Arnstein. Its mission is to present, preserve, promote, and propagate jazz, “America’s classical music.” This is achieved through quality jazz education and performance programs: workshops, master classes, lecture demonstrations, arts enrichment programs, outdoor mobile jazz performances, and events in clubs and major concert halls in New York City and elsewhere. Jazzmobile (www.jazzmobile.org) serves approximately 100,000 people in the New York City area each year.

 

NEW SCHOOL JAZZ STUDENTS HEADLINE HUDSON RIVER PARK TRUST
STARS OF TOMORROW CONCERT SERIES

New School Jazz students return to Hudson Pier to headline the Hudson River Park Trust Stars of Tomorrow concert series. Each Tuesday through August 11, at 6:30 p.m., New School Jazz students will serenade New Yorkers on the Hudson River on Pier 45, located at West and Christopher Streets. This outdoor venue is quickly becoming a Greenwich Village hot spot. The New School Jazz Line-up is:

  • Tuesday, August 4, Amanda Ruzza Trio with Amanda Ruzza, bass; Collin DeJoseph, piano; and Jeff Barton, drums.
  • Tuesday, August 11, Erika Kapin Trio with Erika Kapin, violin; Angelo Spagnolo, guitar; and Maiko Ono, drums.


NEWS FROM PARSONS THE NEW SCHOOL FOR DESIGN

PARSONS GLITTERS AT SWAROVSKI

Members of Parson’s 2009 senior class were given the opportunity to work with Swarovski Crystals ingredient brand, Crystallized-Swarovski Elements, in a costume competition in which they were to create their sparkling version of monarchs in history.

Students had free range in working with over 2,000 Crystallized-Swarovski Elements; however, the only contest rule was that they start with a white palette.

The costumes ranged from Catherine the Great to Ascot Gavotte to Helen of Troy. Ivy Kirk won the grand prize for her crystallized vision of Elvis Presley.

After debuting at Saks Fifth Avenue this past May, alongside their annual showcase of Parsons thesis collections, these costumes will be on display at Swarovski’s Madison Avenue and Rockefeller Center stores from July 27 through October 2. For more information, please visit www.swarovski.com.


GUARNACCIA PUTS A MODERN TWIST ON AN OLD CLASSIC

Steven Guarnaccia, an internationally renowned illustrator and chair of Parsons BFA Illustration program, has taken the classic tale of The Three Little Pigs and given it an architecturally inspired, modern twist in a new children's book published this summer. Here, the story is set among houses by iconic 20th-century architects Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Frank Gehry. The architects live within their famous buildings of glass, stone, mortar, and brick, featuring objects designed by a number of international architects and designers, and fight to keep the wolf from blowing down their houses.

Guarnaccia's Three Little Pigs serves as a child’s introduction to the world of architecture and design, and even contains a glossary explaining the various renowned design objects within the story. It is a follow up to his award-winning recreation of another childhood classic, Goldilocks and the Three Bears: A Tale Moderne, in which Goldilocks finds contentment in an Eames LCW chair. The Three Pigs is published in Italian and English by contemporary art book publisher Corraini. For more information, visit the Corraini website.


NEWS FROM EUGENE LANG COLLEGE THE NEW SCHOOL FOR LIBERAL ARTS

LANG’S ELIZABETH KENDELL WINS RUSSIAN CULTURAL FELLOWSHIP TO TRAVEL TO ST. PETERSBURG

Associate Professor of Writing at Lang Elizabeth Kendell has been awarded a Cultural Fellowship for Study in Russia. The program, designed for American professionals in the field of arts and culture working on creative projects related to Russian culture or history, is sponsored by the Likhachev Foundation, with support from the St. Petersburg City Administration and the Fund of the First Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.

Kendell was one of only 10 applicants chosen from a total of 43 to participate in the competitive program. She will travel to St. Petersburg on August 24 to take part in a specialized program for two weeks, including visits to the city’s cultural organizations, archives, libraries, and museums. She will also meet with experts and cultural figures of St. Petersburg.

Ms. Kendall is a writer and dance and arts critic and historian. She has written four books, including Autobiography of a Wardrobe, as well as regular articles in Dance Magazine, where she is a contributing editor.

As part of the fellowship, she is working on a book project titled, Lidochka, the Lost Muse: George Balanchine, Lidiia Ivanova, Ballet, and Murder in St. Petersburg-Petrograd-Leningrad. She will also work on several articles for mainstream American magazines, including one about the poetry of Anna Akhmatova for Vogue Magazine.



NEWS FROM MILANO THE NEW SCHOOL FOR MANAGEMENT AND URBAN POLICY

DARRICK HAMILTON’S WORK ON COLORISM CITED IN WASHINGTON POST ANALYSIS OF MICHAEL JACKSON

A study by Darrick Hamilton, assistant professor at Milano, originally published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, was cited in a July 12 Washington Post article by DeNeen L. Brown titled, “Through the Past, Darkly: The Legacy of Colorism Reflects Wounds of Racism That Are More Than Skin-Deep.”

Beginning with the statement, “Colorism is the crazy aunt in the attic of racism,” Brown explores the meaning behind Michael Jackson’s lightening skin over his lifetime. Dismissing Jackson’s claims that his changing appearance was due to the skin condition vitiligo, she focuses on colorism, a sub-category of racism and prejudice based on skin color as his motivation to seek out skin lightening treatments.

Brown cites Hamilton’s work as evidence that colorism continues to negatively effect individuals, especially in regards to income and marriage. "There is a well-established literature of colorism, a preference for lighter-skinned individuals," says a report called "Shedding 'Light' on Marriage," which was co-written by Hamilton with Arthur H. Goldsmith, a professor at Washington and Lee University and William A. Darity Jr., a professor at Duke University.

In fact, among black women younger than 30, there is "a premium associated with light-skinned complexion," Hamilton says. "We find that the light-skin shade as measured by survey interviewers is associated with about a 15 percent greater probability of marriage for young black women, and light-skin shade as measured by self-reported biracial status is associated with the presence of better educated and higher-earning spouses for married black females."

Darrick Hamilton is an assistant professor at Milano, an affiliated faculty member in the Department of Economics at The New School for Social Research, an affiliate scholar at the Center for American Progress, and a co-associate director of the American Economic Association Summer Research and Minority Scholarship Program. His work focuses on the causes and consequences of racial and ethnic inequality in economic and health outcomes.


NEW FROM THE NEW SCHOOL FOR DRAMA

DRAMA HONORED AT THE 2009 SAMUEL FRENCH OFF-OFF BROADWAY SHORT PLAY FESTIVAL

This year, of the 40 plays selected for presentation as semi-finalists in the 2009 Samuel French Off-Off Broadway Short Play Festival, eight of the selected entries were submitted by Drama students and alumni: Driving Kitty written and directed by Suzanne Bachner (’97), American Royal by Gabe McKinley (’09), Barron, CA by Jessica Hinds (’10), the bus that got cut over its eye by Matthew Paul Olmos (’04), Generation Graffiti by Janine Nabers (’08), Metro Psalm by J. Julian Christopher (’05), realer than that written and directed by Kitt Lavoie (’01) (who also directed semi-finalist Sharon E. Cooper’s The Cooking King), and This is Jeopardy by Killian Beldy (’06). Both Olmos and Lavoie advanced to the finals, with Lavoie’s play realer than that named one of the six winners of this year’s festival. His play will be published by Samuel French.

Other participating alumni and students included: Olmos’ the bus that got cut over its eye directed by Eriko Ogawa (Directing ‘04), featuring Doug Darwin (Acting ’04), Joshua Peters (Acting ’04), and Rachel Valdati (Acting ‘04); Kathy Gail MacGowan (Directing ’09) directed H.R. by Eric Coble featuring Cheryl Games (Acting/Playwriting ’98), Dana Mazzenga (Acting ’09), and Patrick Williams (Acting ’09); Nabers’ Generation Grafitti directed by Diana Basmajian (Directing ’08) and Malinda Sorci (Directing ’08) featuring Adriana Munera-Checho (Acting ’08), Laura Gourdine (Acting ’08), Melissa Joyner (Acting ’08), Agmar Varela (Acting ’08), and Tai Verley (Acting ’08); Beldy’s This is Jeopardy directed by Amy Leland (Directing ’05) featuring Ibby Cizmar (Acting ‘06) and Chris Reber (Acting ‘06); Christopher’s Metro Psalm featuring Steve Campell (Acting ’05) and Nedra McClyde (Acting ’05); Hinds’Barron, CA directed by Elizabeth Carlson (Directing ’10), stage managed by Lucia Peters (Directing ’10), and featuring Lauren Boyd (Acting ’10), Chaelon Costello (Acting ’10), and Brooke Schlosser (Acting ’10); McKinley’sAmerican Royal directed by Alexandra Hastings (Directing ’08) featuring Nate Faust (Acting ’09) and Betsy Sanders (’08); Christopher Stack (Acting ’01) appeared in Mom was a Carny by Andrew Podell; Bonna Tek (Acting ’03) appeared in Just Knots by Christina Gorman (which was also selected as a winner this year); and Jamie Richards (Directing Faculty) directed Up With (Some) People by Joshua Conkel, which was selected as a finalist.

In total, 39 members of The New School for Drama community participated as playwrights, directors, or actors.

 

NEWS FROM THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH

PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT RECEIVES OUTSTANDING YOUNG SCIENTIST AWARD

Michelle Levine, a PhD student in Psychology, at The New School for Social Research was awarded the 2009 Jason Albrecht Award for Outstanding Young Scientist for her paper “Copresence in Collaborative Musicmaking” at the annual meeting of the Society for Text & Discourse in Rotterdam, Netherlands on July 28, 2009.

The Jason Albrecht Outstanding Young Scientist Award (JAOYSA) honors the memory of Jason Albrecht, a promising young text and discourse researcher who passed away. The award recognizes an outstanding paper based on a doctoral dissertation.


TRANSREGIONAL CENTER FOR DEMOCRATIC STUDIES RELEASES SPRING 2009 NEWSLETTER

The Transregional Center for Democratic Studies (TCDS) has released its Spring 2009 Bulletin. The issue analyzes the “politics of hope” through the legacy of the nonviolent revolutions of 1989 in Central and Eastern Europe as political movements that managed to dismantle authoritarian regimes without bloodshed.

The issue presents an excerpt from author Jonathan Schell’s 2008 speech at The New School as part of a conference “1989 and Beyond: The Future of Democ­racy.” He comments on the current prospects of nonviolent, pro-democracy movements. Additionally, the issue features a recent conversation between two former dissidents and leaders of their respective democratic oppositions, Vaclav Havel and Adam Michnik.

Building on The New School for Social Research's interdisciplinary tradition, the Transregional Center for Democratic Studies (TCDS) creates and conducts cross-departmental research and training programs aimed at addressing special needs and opportunities for graduate study and advanced scholarship in the new global world. TCDS's programs focus on the problems of democratic institutional design at the local, national, and regional levels, in Central and Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Caucasus, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and North America.



NEWS FROM MANNES COLLEGE THE NEW SCHOOL FOR MUSIC

MANNES COLLEGE THE NEW SCHOOL FOR MUSIC SUMMER 2009 INSTITUTES, FESTIVALS, AND SEMINARS

Mannes College The New School for Music culminates its exciting array of classical music institutes, festivals, and seminars with the The Eleventh Annual International Keyboard Institute and Festival, July 19–August 2. For more information about the institutes and festivals, visit www.newschool.edu/mannes/summer.

The International Keyboard Institute, founded by Mannes alumnus and faculty member Jerome Rose, features performances by world-renowned pianists, master classes, and symposia. Two concert series will take place this year: the Prestige Series concert at 6:00 p.m., features accomplished young artists from around the world, many of them recent winners of major international competitions; and the Masters Series concerts at 8:30 p.m. feature guest artists and faculty.

This year the guest artist faculty includes distinguished pianists Joaquín Achúcarro, Philippe Entremont, and Olga Kern, each of whom will give a master classes and perform a recital. Founder/Director Jerome Rose will perform the opening concert on July 19.

Guest artists Alon Goldstein and Piotr Paleczny will make festival concert debuts at the Masters Series. Mykola Suk, Alexander Kobrin, Jeffrey Swann, HaeSun Paik, Steven Mayer, Jose Ramos Santana, and Yuan Sheng will return to give recitals and master classes. David Dubal will give a lecture “Anniversaries: Haydn, Mendelssohn, Albéniz.” Byron Janis joins David Dubal at the mid-point of the festival for “An Afternoon with Byron Janis,” an event that will be free to the public. For a detailed schedule of program information, evening events, and master classes, please visit: www.ikif.org or call 212.580.0210 x4858. All concerts will take place at Mannes Concert Hall, 150 West 85th Street.

Admission: $20 per concert; $15 per master class; Daily Pass: $50 (classes plus 2 concerts); Festival Pass (2 weeks - 28 events): $250; Week I, Festival Pass: $125 (12 concert events; 1 lecture); Week II, Festival Pass: $125 (13 concert events; 1 lecture; MacKenzie Competition semis and finals)

Monday, July 27
Prestige Series Concert, 6:00 p.m.: Sofya Gulyak
Master Series Concert, 8:30 p.m.: Yuan Sheng

Tuesday, July 28
Prestige Series Concert, 6:00 p.m.: Mariya Kim
Master Series Concert, 8:30 p.m.: HaeSun Paik

Wednesday, July 29
Prestige Series Concert, 6:00 p.m.: Ying Feng
Master Series Concert, 8:30 p.m.: Piotr Paleczny

Thursday, July 30
Prestige Series Concert, 6:00 p.m.: Matei Varga
Master Series Concert, 8:30 p.m.: Steven Mayer / Jose Ramos Santana

Friday, July 31
Prestige Series Concert, 6:00 p.m.: Ching-Yun Hu
Master Series Concert, 8:30 p.m.: Alexander Kobrin

Saturday, August 1
MacKenzie Competition Semifinal, 11:00 a.m.
Master Series Concert, 8:30 p.m.: Olga Kern

Sunday, August 2
MacKenzie Competition Final, 11:00 a.m-1:00 p.m. and 2:00-4:00 p.m.


UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

USE YOUR FREE ADMISSION TO DROP IN ON MOMA’S AFTER HOUR THURSDAY NIGHTS IN
JULY AND AUGUST

Thursday, July 2, 2009, marks the first of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA’s) Thursday Nights, a series of Thursday evenings in July and August when the Museum will remain open until 8:45 p.m. We encourage New School students and employees to drop in after work and enjoy access to the entire Museum. In order to receive your free admission, go to the lobby information desk and show them your valid New School ID. Students, faculty, and staff receive one free admission for themselves. Faculty and staff may also obtain an additional two tickets for their guests.

There will be live entertainment as well as drinks and cocktails available for purchase. MoMA is located at 11 West 53rd Street, New York City. Enjoy!

 

TIME OUT NEW YORK DISCOUNT OFFER

Start your year off being in the know about things free or fancy. Time Out New York is offering all students, faculty, and staff at The New School a full year's subscription for just $20! That's 51 issues for the entire year and only 39c an issue. Steal this deal for yourself or a gift to another.


THE BEST DEAL FOR AFFORDABLE THEATER, Dance, and concert TICKETS:
THEATRE DEVELOPMENT FUND

An exciting spring theater, music and dance season is under way: Why pay $100 or more, when you can pay $20-$36 for Broadway shows and Off-Broadway shows, dance performances and concerts? An inexpensive way to enjoy the best of New York culture is to join Theatre Development Fund (TDF).

To be eligible, you must be a full-time student or teacher, senior citizen (62+), civil servant, union member, staff member of a not-for-profit organization, performing arts professional, or member of the clergy or armed forces. Annual membership fee is $27.50, and you can join online.

A small sampling of performances recently available to TDF Members for $20-36 per ticket include: 33 Variations, The 39 Steps, Altar Boyz, American Ballet Theatre, The American Plan, August: Osage County, Avenue Q, Ballet NY, Beast, Big Apple Circus, Blithe Spirit, Christopher Cross at B.B. King's, Distracted, Enter Laughing, Exit the King, The Fantasticks, Forbidden Broadway Goes to Rehab, Fueerzabruta, Gypsy, Hedda Gabler, Impressionism, Irena's Vow, Joe Turner's Come and Gone, London Philharmonic at Lincoln Center; The Marvelous Wonderettes, Mourning Becomes Electra, New York City Ballet, New York Philharmonic, Next to Normal, Pal Joey, Patti Austin at Brooklyn Center; Paul Taylor Dance Company, The Phantom of the Opera, Reasons to be Pretty, Rock of Ages, Ruined, Shrek: The Musical; Speed the Plow, Spring Awakening and Uncle Vanya.

So don't miss this great opportunity to see great theater at great prices.

NEW YORK TIMES DISCOUNTS

The New York Times is offering a 60 percent discount ($.40/per day Monday-Saturday, $2.50 on Sunday) for home or office subscriptions to all faculty, staff, and students.

Here's how it works. Unlike traditional subscriptions, the education rate can be set up by semester or in a combination that best reflects your schedules for both delivery and billing. New School faculty, staff, and students can have a subscription Monday-Friday, Sunday only, weekends only, or any combination.

To take advantage of the special discount to the Times or to change a current subscription, students, faculty (full-time and part-time), and staff should contact the customer service center at 888.NYT.COLL, to order a single subscription or a classroom subscription of up to eight copies for required reading in the classroom.

To order a classroom subscription of eight or more copies for required reading in the classroom, contact the education program's customer service center at 800.631.1222.

WOULDN'T YOU LIKE TO SAVE TIME AND MONEY ON ENTERTAINMENT?

As a member of The New School, you have access to exclusive entertainment benefits through Plum Benefits! From theater and dance to sports and comedy, you can use this benefit to save time and money when ordering tickets for great seats to the hottest events in town! Log on 24/7 to enjoy:

Exclusive offers for premiere entertainment
Discounts of up to 50% off
Access to hard-to-get seats
Cost-free service
No ticket-ordering obligations
Easy ticket ordering
Helpful Customer Service at www.plumbenefits.com, 212.660.1888, or contact@plumbenefits.com

Already Signed Up to View Your Entertainment Benefits Online?
Log in now at www.plumbenefits.com to view this month's entertainment offers.

Not Yet Signed Up to View Your Entertainment Benefits Online?
Simply visit www.plumbenefits.com, click the "Sign-Up Now" button and follow the on-site instructions to create your profile and password. Registration is free and takes just a few moments-all you need is your groupwise email address.

 


The Weekly Observer, The New School online publication, is sent to everyone with a University email account. It is also available on the University web site. To add an external address to the email list, please send a message from the account you wish to add to majordomo@listserv.newschool.edu. In the message, on a line by itself, type "subscribe observer".

To submit at item for publication in The Observer, please email observer@newschool.edu.

Submissions deadline for the Observer:
Submissions for the Observer must be received by Wednesday afternoon to appear in the following issue.

 
"));