Children and Families

NEW REPORT: Big Dreams for New York City's Youngest Children: The future of early care and education

In October 2012, New York City launched EarlyLearnNYC, a plan that would upend its system for providing subsidized child care to working class and low-income families Two years in, the results are mixed. This report provides an analysis of the plan and recommendations for reform. READ MORE » DOWNLOAD PDF »

What's New

Big Dreams for NYs Youngest Children

RECENT EVENT

Big Dreams for New York's Youngest Children: The future of early care and education

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

With the creation of EarlyLearnNYC in 2012, New York City reinvented its system for subsidized early care and education for children from low-income families. Now, as the city launches an expanded Pre-K network for 4-year-olds, what will happen to subsidized child care for younger kids? Can the reform vision of EarlyLearn be put fully into action and sustained? A conversation with experts in the field and the release of findings from a new Center for New York City Affairs report on early care and education. READ MORE » WATCH VIDEO »

CWW Vol 23_Baby Steps

PAST REPORT

Baby Steps: Poverty, chronic stress, and New York's youngest children

CWW Volume 23, Fall 2013

Our new Child Welfare Watch report investigates the impact of poverty, trauma and chronic stress on the city's infants and toddlers, and illuminates how nurturing caregivers can buffer young children from the negative impacts of adversity. We report on the scientific evidence that stress can harm babies' development. READ MORE » DOWNLOAD »

Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress & New York's Youngest Children

PAST EVENT

Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress & New York's Youngest Children

Friday, October 4, 2013

Chronic stress and early trauma shape the brain development of very young children. Increasingly, research shows that innovative, early-life work with infants, toddlers and their parents can help prevent the need for much more costly interventions later on. Can we reduce the likelihood of abuse, neglect and mental illness in stressed-out, low-income families? What kinds of targeted interventions are working? And how should government and nonprofits respond? A conversation with experts in the field, and the release of the latest edition of Child Welfare Watch. READ MORE » WATCH VIDEOS »

 
"));