Children and Families

Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress & New York’s Youngest Children

NEW REPORT: Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress & New York's Youngest Children

Our new Child Welfare Watch report investigates the impact of poverty, trauma and chronic stress on the city's infants and toddlers, and illuminates how nurturing caregivers can buffer young children from the negative impacts of adversity. We report on the scientific evidence that stress can harm babies' development. READ MORE » DOWNLOAD PDF »

What's New

Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress & New York's Youngest Children

RECENT EVENT

Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress & New York's Youngest Children

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2013

Chronic stress and early trauma shape the brain development of very young children. Increasingly, research shows that innovative, early-life work with infants, toddlers and their parents can help prevent the need for much more costly interventions later on. Can we reduce the likelihood of abuse, neglect and mental illness in stressed-out, low-income families? What kinds of targeted interventions are working? And how should government and nonprofits respond? A conversation with experts in the field, and the release of the latest edition of Child Welfare Watch. READ MORE »

Watch Interviews from our Recent Event

FEATURED

Watch Interviews from our Recent Event

Thursday, October 17

On October 4th, Child Welfare Watch hosted a forum on New York City's youngest children. Our panel of experts discussed what babies and very small children need in order to grow healthy and strong—and the potentially devastating impacts of poverty and chronic stress on early childhood development. READ MORE »

How does the federal shutdown affect NYC children and families?

news brief

How does the federal shutdown affect NYC children and families?

Wednesday, October 9

When Congress shut down the federal government nine days ago (and counting), billions of dollars stopped flowing from D.C. to state and local governments. With notable exceptions, most social safety net programs have kept running, using a patchwork of funds left over from the last fiscal year, contingency dollars from federal agencies, and money from state and local governments. What does the shutdown mean for programs that serve children and families in New York City? READ MORE »

 
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