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Archive of Webcasts for Special Events
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Music & Performance
Artist in Residence, Laurie Anderson
Mannes Downtown- Chamber Music at the New School
Mannes Downtown- Chamber Music at the New School
Mannes Downtown- Chamber Music at the New School
Performance and Screening: Laurie Anderson, Herself
Performance and Screening: Sound and Spatialization

Art & Architecture/Design
A Cinematic City
An Artforum Roundtable: Curating the WHITNEY Biennial
Art Test(s) Sites: Nevada Real Estate
At the Parsons Table: Chuck Close in conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger
At the Parsons Table: Frank Gehry and Parsons Dean Paul Goldberger
At the Parsons Table: Michael Graves in Conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger
At the Parsons Table: Donna Karan in Conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger
At the Parsons Table: Bruce Mau in conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger
Bends in the Road: Looking Forward and Back Along New York’s Grand Concourse
Confounding Expectations: Photography in Context, Falling Through the Cracks: Photography by "Great Unknowns"
Confounding Expectations: Photography in Context, Photography After Film: The Shock of the New Technology
Confounding Expectations 2: Nazar: Contemporary Photography in the Arab World
Confounding Expectations 2: Constructed Realities
Confounding Expectations 2: Art Photography Now
Confounding Expectations 3: Photography in Context Photojournalism and its Discontents History, Present, and Future of Photography and the Press
Confounding Expectations 3: Photography in Context What Makes an Image Iconic?
Confounding Expectations 3: Photography in Context Photography Education Today: an Exploration of How We are Creating a New Generation of Image-Based Artists
Dreamland or Nightmare? The Future Development of Coney Island and Its Community
Emerging Creative Voices from Pakistan: A Political Context
Marcia Tucker Memorial Tribute
Public Art Fund Talks at The New School with Alex Katz
Reclaiming the Land
The Public Talks Roundtable: The Public Theater Goes to War
The SculptureCenter Lectures: A Subjective History of Sculpture with John Armleder
The SculptureCenter Lectures: A Subjective History of Sculpture with Trisha Donnelly
The Story Prize Award Ceremony
Unforgiving Art? Unforgivable Nation?

International Politics and Culture
2003 Nation Summit on Cuba: Mikhail Gorbachev
Armageddon and Indian Point: A Conversation with Helen Caldicott and Jonathan Schell
Bob Kerrey, India and The New School
Bombay: Foreground or Background? A Conversation with Artists Gieve Patel and Sudhir Patwardhan
Building the Bicentennial
Cultural Genocide and Hegemony: Keys to Political, Economic, Religious and Cultural Domination
Emerging Creative Voices from Pakistan: A Political Context
Ethics and Debt: Reflections on the Argentine Experience
Exiting Iraq: Is There Any Strategy?
Expectations and Experiences in the Latin American Region
Fortress America's Barriers to Global Talent
Globalization, Ethics, and Violence in a Postpolitical Age
Globalization, Outsourcing, and US Prosperity
Inaugural Conference: Cities in a World of Migration: India and China in Global Perspective
India & China: Who's Ahead?
Institutional and Social Reform in Argentina First Lady of Argentina, Senator Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner
Journalism: Media Perspectives of a Global Generation
Leading Edge in Policy Choices for Human Development Lecture Series: Joseph Stiglitz: Making Globalization Work
Mexico’s Perilous Presidential Election
Nestor Kirchner, President of Argentina
President of Argentina Nestor Kirchner and Professor Paul Krugman, a Public Conversation on the First Year of the New Argentine Government
Revisioning India and China: Authors & Artists - Narendra Jadhav
Statecraft and Political Vision: The US and Argentine Experiences
The Content of Democracy: Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen
Their America: The U.S in the Eyes of the Rest of the World
War Crimes in West Africa, Will there be Justice?
What is our Nation’s Role in the World in an Age of Terrorism?
What’s Happened to Women’s Rights Around the Planet?
Will China Democratize?
Women of the Underground

National Politics
9-11 Commission Hearings
Blue State Blues
Bob Kerrey in Conversation with U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy and Ted Sorensen
Electing the New President of the United States: the Mathematics of Electoral College Politics
Fear: Its Political Uses and Abuses Vice President Al Gore: Keynote address
Gov. Howard Dean
Humanity and Torture: Effective Interrogation or Brutality?
Humanity and Torture: Taxi to the Dark Side
James K. Galbraith Modern Economic Predation: War, Corporate Fraud and the Cruel Chimera of Labor Market Reform
Politics of Resistance
Politics - Not as Usual: Investigative Journalism in an Election Year
Politics - Not as Usual: It's Still the Economy, Stupid!
Politics - Not as Usual: Elizabeth Drew on American Politics: What's Going Wrong and Why
President Kerrey to Discuss New Book on John Kerry
Privatizing America’s Foreign Policy
Public Investement in the 21st Century
Sexual Harassment: Twenty Years After Meritor V. Vinson
Statecraft and Political Vision: The US and Argentine Experiences
The End of the Bush Era: Re-Finding Our Way on Foreign Policy
The End of Cooperation: The Economic Costs of American Unilateralism
The Inaugural William Phillips Lecture
The Prince of the City: Giuliani's New York and the Genius of American Life
The Prison Industry: Artistic Approaches to Activism
The Roberts Court: One-Year Out
Their America: The U.S in the Eyes of the Rest of the World

Urban Conversations: Cities at Risk
Urban Conversations: Where Red Meets Blue
U.S. Mayors and Innovative Leadership: Mayor Bloomberg, Bob Kerrey, SF Mayor Gavin Newsom, and George Stephanopoulos
What is our Nation’s Role in the World in an Age of Terrorism?
Women and Grassroots Conservatism
Zero Culture. The Polarization Between Memorial and Culture at Ground Zero

Art and Technology
Art Test(s) Sites: Nevada Real Estate
Confounding Expectations: Photography in Context: The Mind of the Photo Editor

Critical Themes in Media Studies Student Conference Keynote Speech: Lev Manovich
Open Source on the Line
Performance and Screening: Sound and Spatialization

Business and Economics
A Conversation with John Tisch, President Bob Kerrey, and Fred P. Hochberg
Americans Face Rising Economic Insecurity: What Can Be Done?
Icarus in the Board Room: Saving American Business from Corporate Corruption
Is the Sky Falling? Challenging the Conventional Economic Wisdom
Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Laureate, to discuss new book, The Roaring Nineties
Learn the Do's and Dont's of Running a Successful Business
Paul Krugman: What Went Wrong?
The Content of Democracy: Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen
The End of Cooperation: The Economic Costs of American Unilateralism
The World of Words: Writing About Wall Street: Exposing the Market's Myths and Mirrors

Media and Journalism
Confounding Expectations: Photography in Context: The Mind of the Photo Editor
Journalism Under Fire: The View from the Newsroom (Part 1 of 4)
Journalism Under Fire: Aren't Women Citizens? (Part 2 of 4)
Journalism Under Fire: Writers Taking the News Personally (Part 3 of 4)
Journalism Under Fire: Covering the Holes in History (Part 4 of 4)
Politics - Not as Usual: Elizabeth Drew on American Politics: What's Going Wrong and Why
Politics - Not as Usual: Investigative Journalism in an Election Year
Politics - Not as Usual: It's Still the Economy, Stupid!
Public Perception of Torture: News and Entertainment
Radio Communities: The Other Side of the Electronic Divide
The Books That Reach the Shelves
The Future of Journalism: The Changing Face of Cable and Broadcast News
The Future of Journalism: Should Political Advertising Have a Future?
The Future of Journalism: Will Newspapers Become Information Geysers?
The World of Words: Deciding What You Read: How Editors, Agents, Publicists, and Reviewers Choose
The World of Words: From Rejection to Publication: Navigating the No's on the Road to Sucess

Government
9-11 Commission Hearings
Electing the Next President of the United States: The Mathematics of Electoral College Politics
Fear: Its Political Uses and Abuses Vice President Al Gore: Keynote address
Gov. Howard Dean
Governing Change: Policy, Politics and the Spitzer Administration
President Kerrey to Discuss New Book on John Kerry
Reclaiming the Land
U.S. Mayors and Innovative Leadership: Mayor Bloomberg, Bob Kerrey, SF Mayor Gavin Newsom, and George Stephanopoulos

Society and Culture
Art Test(s) Sites: Nevada Real Estate
Don't Panic - A Series of Discussions Parenting: Why Are We Afraid To Let Go?
Don't Panic - A Series of Discussions: On The Couch: Why Do I Feel So Ill?  The Worried Well
Dreamland or Nightmare? The Future Development of Coney Island and Its Community
Elisabeth Young-Bruehl Notions of Forgiveness in the Work of Hannah Arendt
Gay Sex, Safe Sex: What is to be Done
Humanity and Torture: Effective Interrogation or Brutality?
Icarus in the Board Room: Saving American Business from Corporate Corruption
Is Secularism Dead? Prospects for Nonbelief in the 21st Century
Living in a State of Fear
Log Cabin
Paul Krugman: What Went Wrong?
Reclaiming the Land
Sex (Limited) Education
Sex Work Matters: Beyond Divides
Sexual Harassment: Twenty Years After Meritor V. Vinson

Slavery and Black Participation in the Civil War
Social Protection Initiatives for Children, Women and Families: An Analysis of Recent Experiences
Some Observations on Female Sexuality: A Public Lecture by Julia Kristeva
The Gay Marriage Battle
The Human Footprint: Has Human Civilization Gone Too Far?
The Marshall McLuhan Lecture: Lewis Lapham
The Neoliberal Agenda for the Future of Science
The Parallax of Evil: Domination and Hegemony, with Jean Baudrillard and Sylvère Lotringer
When Affirmative Action Was White


9-11 Commission Hearings
Webcast: May 18, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Part 1 (audio only)
Part 2 (audio only)
Part 3 (audio only)
Part 4 (audio only)

Webcast: May 19, 8:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m.
Statement 14 (audio only)
Rudolph W. Giuliani (audio only)
Commission Panel & Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg (audio only)
Secretary of Homeland Security Thomas J. Ridge (audio only)

The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States will hold its eleventh public hearing on May 18-19, 2004, at The New School. University President Bob Kerrey is a member of the Commission.

The two-day hearing will examine the response of local and federal emergency response departments on September 11, 2001, and will consider how to improve these critical functions in the event of future terrorist attacks. The Commission will hear from the current and former top-level officials in the fire, police, and emergency management departments of New York City, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and Arlington County, Virginia. Secretary of Homeland Security Thomas J. Ridge and former New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani will also testify. Three staff statements will be presented during the course of the hearing. The hearing will resume on Wednesday, May 19.

“At this hearing, the Commission turns its attention to the day of September 11, 2001. We will focus on what confronted civilians and first responders during the attacks, how they made decisions under adverse conditions, and what first responders communicated to civilians and to each other,” said Commission Chair Thomas H. Kean. “The Commission also will explore the state of the emergency preparedness and response today,” said Commission Vice Chair Lee H. Hamilton. “We will examine what steps have been taken since 9-11 to improve our preparedness against terrorist attacks and other emergencies, and whether we need national standards of preparedness.” The agenda will be posted on the 9-11 Commission Web site at www.9-11commission.gov one week before the hearings. The general information phone # is 202.331.4060.

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2003 National Summit on Cuba
Webcast

Former USSR President Mikhail Gorbachev's speech at the 2003 National Summit on Cuba in Miami. Mr. Gorbachev provides a unique historical perspective on Cuba and offers his views on how US policy toward Cuba can be improved. Introduced by Michael Putney, ABC News Anchor, Miami.

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A Cinematic City
Webcast:
Part 1: Ranjani Mazumdar
Part 2: Provost Arjun Appadurai & Thomas Blom Hansen
Part 3: Q&A
Friday, December 9, 6:00-8:00 p.m.

Ranjani Mazumdar, NYU Visiting Faculty and Filmmaker, will give a presentation on "The Gangster City of Bombay Cinema." This is to be followed by two other related comments by Provost Arjun Appadurai, author of "Crime Noir: The Underworld of Film in Millennial Mumbai," and Thomas Blom Hansen, of Yale University, author of "The Anthropologist and the Hustler: Introductory Notes on Infra-Power and Legibility in the City." A discussion will follow. This extended panel will be chaired by Carol A. Breckenridge. Sponsored by the South Asia Forum, www.newschool.edu/gf/centers/southasia/index.htm.

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A Conversation with John Tisch
Webcast
Wednesday, April 27, 2005

Jonathan Tischwill speak about his highly-acclaimed book, The Power of We: Succeeding Through Partnerships (John Wiley & Sons). One of New York City’s most respected business and community leaders, Tisch’s career is a testament to lasting success through corporate responsibility. He will talk about his approach to leadership through partnership and collaboration and share practical advice on how organizations and individuals add value when they inspire good corporate citizenship and civic responsibility.

The conversation is part of Milano's Change Forum Speakers Series. Each spring, The Change Forum invites a prominent scholar or practitioner of organizational development and change management to engage Milano students in a dialogue about management practices. The Change Forum is a student organization of the Organizational Change Management Program at Milano.

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Americans Face Rising Economic Insecurity: What Can Be Done?
A Special Symposium on the Crisis in the U.S. Pensions System
Webcast: Part 1 and Part 2.
Monday, December 11, 2006

Americans face an indisputable crisis of the private pensions system, and the appropriate policy response remains unclear. Three prominent researchers discuss their recent books on the subject. They will each identify the causes and scope of the problem, and outline proposals for what can be done. Followed by a reception and book signing.

Featuring Robin Blackburn, The New School for Social Research, author of Age Shock: How Finance is Failing Us (Verso Books, 2006); Teresa Ghilarducci, University of Notre Dame, author of How Defined Contribution Plans and 401(k)s Affect Employer Pension Costs: 1981-1998 (Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, 2006); and Jacob Hacker, Yale University, author of The Great Risk Shift: The Assault on American Jobs, Families, Health Care, and Retirement--And How You Can Fight Back (Oxford University Press, 2006). With Bob Kerrey, President of The New School, as discussant.

Sponsored by The Bernard Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA). For more information, visit www.newschool.edu/cepa.

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An Artforum Roundtable: Curating the WHITNEY Biennial
Webcast
Monday, January 23, 2006

As a first in its 70-year history, the Whitney Biennial 2006 will feature American artists working abroad, foreign-born artists working in the U.S. and those having lived here all their lives. Even before its opening in March 2006, this biennial is being heralded as one that “will take in the world,” (TheNew York Times). This panel brings together curators of the upcoming Whitney Biennial, Chrissie Iles and Philippe Vergne, along with several past curators of the biennial, Klaus Kertess, Louise Neri, Lisa Phillips, and Elisabeth Sussman, to discuss the difficulties inherent in realizing a curatorial concept and coping with the firestorm that follows such an overdetermined event. The dynamics between expectations versus results, or experience versus expectations, will drive the discussion. The event inaugurates the collaboration between Artforum International and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School. Additional roundtable discussions to be announced.

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Aperture Foundation Presents Confounding Expectations: Photography in Context
Falling Through the Cracks: Photography by "Great Unknowns"

Webcast
Wednesday, February 23, 2005

Curators, writers, dealers, and collectors are constantly discovering (or “rediscovering”) wonderful, innovative photographic works that somehow never reached a broad audience or were once noticed but subsequently forgotten. Our panelists show the work of several “unknown” artists whom they believe deserve serious attention and acknowledgement, followed by a discussion of why and how great artists can (still) fall through the cracks. Panelists: Bonnie Yochelson, independent scholar, on Esther Bubley; Julie Saul, Julie Saul Gallery, on Luigi Ghirri; and Daniel Wolff, founder of Light Gallery, on Jerry Shore. Moderated by Melissa Harris, editor in chief, Aperture magazine. Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Departments of The New School and Parsons School of Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School with generous support from the Henry Nias Foundation and the New York State Council on the Arts.

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Aperture Foundation Lectures Confounding Expectations: Photography in Context
The Mind of the Photo Editor

Webcast
Wednesday, March 9, 2005

Photo editors choose what they print from thousands of images. Their choices can affect how major issues such as elections, wars, social upheavals, and crimes are interpreted by the public. How do they make these choices? What are the pressures on them? How do editors differ in their approaches? Panelists: Elisabeth Biondi, visuals editor, The New Yorker; Kathy Ryan, photo editor, New York Times Magazine; and Christopher Morris, contract photographer Time magazine. Moderated by Vicki Goldberg, New York Times photography critic. Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Departments of The New School and Parsons School of Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School with generous support from the Henry Nias Foundation and the New York State Council on the Arts.

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Aperture Foundation Lectures Confounding Expectations: Photography in Context
Photography After Film: The Shock of the New Technology

Webcast
Wednesday, May 11, 7:00 p.m.

Every advance in technology brings gains and losses. What have digital technologies meant to photographers in terms of how they frame their visions? Whether the subject is war or the depiction of ordinary modern life, does film or digital manipulation make a difference in how the artist interprets reality? Artists who defend the aesthetic superiority of film talk with others whose work embraces the new digital possibilities. Panelists: Duane Michals, photographer; andGregory Crewdson, photographer. Moderated byAmei Wallach, critic and author. Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Departments of The New School and Parsons School of Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School with generous support from the Henry Nias Foundation and the New York State Council on the Arts.

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Aperture Foundation Presents Confounding Expectations 2: Art Photography Now
Webcast: Artist's talks; Q & A.
Wednesday, December 7, 2005

Timed to coincide with the U.S. release of the new book with the same title. Author Susan Bright, UK independent curator, is joined by three of her feature artists (to be confirmed), Katy Granan, U.S.; Gabriel Orozco, Mexico; and Sam Taylor Wood, UK. Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Department of Parsons The New School of Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics with generous support from the Kettering Family Foundation and the Henry Nias Foundation. This program is made possible, in part, by public funds from New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

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Aperture Foundation Presents Confounding Expectations 2: Constructed Realities
Webcast
Wednesday, November 9, 7:00 p.m.

The earliest photographers luxuriated in the ability of the medium to capture more of the visible world than is discernable to the human eye. Today, photographic artists take full advantage of imaging technologies to create entire worlds - frequently with striking results. Moderator Lesley Martin, executive editor of books, Aperture Foundation; with artists Catherine Chalmers, Simen Johan, Laurie Simmons, and collaborators Kahn and Selesnick.

Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Department of Parsons The New School of Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics with generous support from the Kettering Family Foundation and the Henry Nias Foundation. This program is This program is made possible, in part, by public funds from New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

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Aperture Foundation Presents Confounding Expectations 2:
Nazar: Contemporary Photography in the Arab World

Webcast
Wednesday, September 28, 7:00 p.m.

This panel coincides with Nazar, the first exhibition at Aperture's new Chelsea gallery. The show, organized by the Norderlicht Festival of the Netherlands, features 18 artists from 17 Arab countries, many never exhibited before in the United States. Moderator Isolde Brielmaier, assistant professor, Vassar College, and contributor to the book and exhibition Nazar; with artists Wouter Deruytter, Lalla Essaidi, and Negar Azimi, visiting professor of photography from Harvard University.

Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Department of Parsons The New School of Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics with generous support from the Kettering Family Foundation and the Henry Nias Foundation. This program is made possible, in part, by public funds from New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

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Aperture Foundation presents Confounding Expectations 3: Photography in Context
What Makes an Image Iconic?

Audiocast
Wednesday, February 15, 2006

Diane Arbus's twin girls, Arnold Newman's portrait of Stravinsky, Richard Avedon's fashion model with elephant are three examples of iconic images-pictures that stay in the mind as representative not only of their creators, but of a culture. What qualities make a photograph's impact last? Is it possible to predict which of the thousands of new images that assail us daily will someday be deemed "great"? Moderator: Diana Edkins, Director of Exhibitions and Limited-Edition Photographs, Aperture. Panelists: Rick Wester, Director, photography department, Phillips de Pury Auction House; Anthony Bannon, Executive Director, George Eastman House; Celso Gonzalez-Falla, Aperture Foundation Board Chair and Prominent Collector.

Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Department of Parsons The New School for Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, with generous support from the Kettering Family Foundation and the Henry Nias Foundation. This program is made possible, in part, by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

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Aperture Foundation presents Confounding Expectations 3: Photography in Context Photojournalism and its Discontents History, Present, and Future of Photography and the Press
Audiocast
Wednesday, March 22, 7:00 p.m.

Presenting multiple perspectives on the development of photojournalism over the last fifty years, this panel will discuss photojournalism, the press and new directions in picture story telling. The panel marks the publication of Things as They Are-Photojournalism in Context Since 1955. Moderator: Chris Boot, U.K. publisher and packager of Things As They Are. Panelists: Mary Panzer, historian and author of Things As They Are; Susan Meiselas, photographer; Michele McNally, Director of Photography, New York Times; Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, renowned photojournalists, who work as a pair. Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Department of Parsons The New School for Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, with generous support from the Kettering Family Foundation and the Henry Nias Foundation. This program is made possible, in part, by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

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Aperture Foundation presents Confounding Expectations 3: Photography in Context
Photography Education Today: An Exploration of How We are Creating a New Generation of Image-Based Artists

Audiocast
Wednesday, May 3, 2006

There are many who believe that an artist cannot be taught, just encouraged. Others maintain that, apart from learning basic skills, aspiring photographers can be helped to understand contemporary photographic discourse. How are young photographers being taught today? Presented by the Aperture Foundation in collaboration with the Photography Department of Parsons The New School for Design and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, with generous support from the Kettering Family Foundation and the Henry Nias Foundation. This program is made possible, in part, by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Moderator: Michelle Bogre, Chair of the Photography department at Parsons the New School for Design. Panelists: John Divola, Chair of the Photography department at University California, Riverside; Robert Thall, Chair of the Photography department at Columbia College, Chicago.
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Armageddon and Indian Point: A Conversation with Helen Caldicott and Jonathan Schell
Webcast
Thursday, May 4, 2006

Helen Caldicott, President of the Nuclear Policy Research Institute, founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, author of Nuclear Power is Not the Answer to Global Warming or Anything Else;

Jonathan Schell, Harold Willens Peace Fellow at the Nation Institute, and author of The Unconquerable World.

In a recent article for Foreign Policy, “Apocalypse Soon,” Robert McNamara wrote: “It is time—well past time, in my view—for the United States to cease its Cold War-style reliance on nuclear weapons as a foreign policy tool. At the risk of appearing simplistic and provocative, I would characterize current U.S. nuclear weapons policy as immoral, illegal, militarily unnecessary, and dreadfully dangerous.” Taking off from this observation, Dr. Caldicott and Jonathan Schell undertake a frank discussion about the dangers of a prospective revival of nuclear power and weapons in the 21st century, emphasizing the fatal nexus of proliferation, terrorist groups, and newly aggressive nuclear policies of the United States and other nuclear powers. Co-sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs and the World Policy Institute.

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Art Test(s) Sites: Nevada Real Estate
Audiocast

The artistic collaborative known as eteam and Matthew Coolidge from the Center for Land Use and Interpretation (CLUI) present a set of unconventional sites of cultural production that they have found in or carved into the state of Nevada through original research processes and experimental artistic projects. eteam and Coolidge also discuss the role of real estate acquisition and land use as part of their work.

This program is presented in conjunction with "International Airport Montello," a project by eteam and the people of Montello commissioned by Art in General. The project uses as canvas a 10-acre piece of land that eteam purchased in an auction on eBay.com. It includes the production of events and memories about an abandoned airstrip (approximately 6,000 feet and located nearby eteam's land) to make of it local cultural paradigm. The project's construction wiki-website is operated by eteam and the people of Montello: http://www.meineigenheim.org/airport/doku.php

Organized by Art in General in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics.

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Artist in Residence, Laurie Anderson
Student Master class lecture webcast

Monday April 11, 2005

You will need the free Real Player to view the webcast.

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At the Parsons Table: Bruce Mau in conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger
Webcast
Thursday, December 15, 2005

Brilliant, controversial, and indefinable, Bruce Mau has been called by Time magazine a "pinwheeling, all-purpose creative force." At once an designer, theorist, cultural explorer, Mau specializes in confounding expectations, whether through his collaboration with Rem Koolhaas on the book "S, M, L, XL;" his work with Frank Gehry on signage for a biodiversity museumin Panama, or his monumental exhibition, "Massive Change: The Future of Global Design," a multi-media extravaganza that takes on the intersections where design, technology, culture, science, genetics, the internet, and civilization.

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At The Parsons Table: Chuck Close in conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Thursday, October 27, 6:30 pm

One of the most influential artists of our time, Chuck Close has spent three decades subverting concepts of portraiture - and even the basic contemporary-art-world notion that portraiture is a moribund form. Larger than life and labor-intensive, Close's "faces" -- friends, artists, family members, and more-often-than-not, himself -- take on the dimensionality of vast topographic maps, grid systems, or kaleidoscopes. Close's work has been the subject of dozens of major exhibitions, including a retrospective of his self portraits now on view at the Walker Art Center and opening at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in November.

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At the Parsons Table: Donna Karan in conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger
Webcast
Thursday, April 20, 6:30 p.m.

“Everything I do is a matter of heart, body, and soul,” says Parsons alumni Donna Karan, one of the most celebrated and influential fashion designers of the last 30 years. From her beginnings as a designer for Anne Klein, Karan went on to found her own company and in 1985 introduced her first collection, a set of sleek, versatile, bodysuit-based wardrobe separates that virtually reinvented women’s corporate style. From those iconographic “five easy pieces,” Karan built a design empire that today spans menswear, beauty, and home furnishings. Dubbed the “Queen of Seventh Avenue” by the media, she has been saluted by the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) an unprecedented six times, including its Lifetime Achievement award in 2004 as her company celebrated its 20th anniversary.

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At the Parsons Table: Frank Gehry in conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger
Webcast
Monday, November 29, 2004

Parsons School of Design presents the first in a new series of public dialogues, At the Parsons Table, when renowned architect Frank Gehry joins Parsons Dean Paul Goldberger for a lively discussion that will address some of the most topical issues in the field of architecture and design. Dean Goldberger will discuss with Frank Gehry the influences, inspirations, and evolutions that have characterized his acclaimed body of work. This will include important early work, watershed projects as the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao and Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, recently completed projects such as The Ray and Maria Stata Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Jay Pritzker Pavilion in Chicago, and his first major commission in New York, the cultural complex to be built on the site of the World Trade Center. Following the inaugural program with Frank Gehry, the series will continue next spring with featured guests to be announced. For more information visit www.parsons.edu/events.

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At the Parsons Table: Michael Graves in conversation with Dean Paul Goldberger 
Webcast
Wednesday, March 8, 2006

“There is no architect alive who has managed to cross markets with such success,” wrote the New York Times of architect Michael Graves, whose buildings and elegant products have made him one of the most recognized and successful designers in the world. Graves has built a reputation on designing across an unusually broad spectrum—from entire communities to buildings to rooms to household objects. From the mid-1980s, when his Whistling Bird Teakettle for Alessi became the icon of the decade, to today’s wildly successful partnership with Target, he has elevated the design of well over a thousand products.

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Bends in the Road: Looking Forward and Back Along New York’s Grand Concourse
Audiocast
Thursday, September 22, 6:30 p.m.

The Grand Concourse, the great boulevard of the Bronx, celebrates its 100th birthday next year. The Grand Concourse was always more than a street. In 1906, it was an optimistic gesture of faith in New York City’s growth. Its design married architectural ambition with planning innovation, and the Concourse quickly became a magnet for real estate development and social aspiration. Today, it is the center of a vibrantly multiracial community and remains a powerful symbol of the Bronx identity and experience, and several new projects point toward a new era of prosperity.

Architectural historian Francis Morrone describes how the Grand Concourse has evolved; architect Paul Sheehan unveils Arquitectonica’s design for the first major new building on the Concourse in 30 years, a new home for the Bronx Museum of the Arts; artist Pablo Helguera introduces his latest project, a public mediation on the Concourse’s famed Paradise Theater, and lifelong Concourse resident Sam Goodman (an urban planner in the office of the Bronx Borough President) imagines a grand future for the Grand Concourse. Moderated by Ned Kaufman, consultant and director, Pratt Institute’s Historic Preservation program. 

Co-sponsored by the Bronx Museum of the Arts, the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, and The New School Institute for Retired Professionals.

Moderator: Ned Kaufman.
Panelists: Nestor Denyluk, Architecture Historian; Pablo Helguera, Visual Artist; Bernardo Fort-Brescia, Architect.

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Bob Kerrey, India and The New School
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Thursday, February 08, 2007

President Kerrey will discuss the highlights of his recent trip to India and explain how The New School’s expanding constituency there is an important breakthrough for an increasingly internationalized university. As part of a special presentation called Perspectives on Globalization and Democracy: India and China, he will be joined by Provost Ben Lee; Arjun Appadurai, John Dewey Professor in the Social Sciences and senior advisor for Global Initiatives; and Ashok Gurung, director of the India China Institute.

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Bombay: Foreground or Background?
Webcast
Friday, January 27, 2006

A conversation with artists Gieve Patel and Sudhir Patwardhan
This program is sponsored by the The South Asia Forum at The New School. Chair: Prof. Faisal Devji

Gieve Patel is a practicing physician, an artist, a poet and a playwright. Selected exhibitions include Crossing Generations: Diverge, 40 years of Gallery Chelmould curated by Geeta Kapur and Chaitanya Sambrani, Mumbai 2003; Coups de Coeur, Halle Sud, Geneva, 1987; Contemporary Indian Art, Grey Art Gallery, New York 1985; India, Myth and Reality, Museum of Modern Art, Oxford 1982; Contemporary Indian Art, Royal Academy of Art, London 1982; Menton Biennale, France 1976. Patel lives and works in Mumbai. Sudhir Patwardhan is a self taught artist and a practicing radiologist. Apart from several solo shows he has participated in international exhibitions including Edge of Desire, Asia Society, New York 2005; Century City, Tate Modern 2001; Epic Reality, Contemporary Art Museum, Houston 1997; Festival of India, Center George Pompidou, Paris 1986; Coupe de Coeur, Geneva 1987; Contemporary Indian Art, Festival of India, New York 1985; Museum of Modern Art, Oxford, 1982; Contemporary Indian Art, Festival of India, London, 1982; Seven Indian Artists, Hamburg, West Germany, 1982. Artist Information and Image courtesy of the Bose Pacia Gallery.

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Building the Bicentennial
Webcast
Monday, March 6, 2006

A presentation and discussion of Building Bicentennials: Argentina 2010, a new book edited by Margarita Gutman, core faculty in the Bachelors Program and the Graduate Program in International Affairs. The book, published jointly by Caras y Caretas, a leading Argentine political and cultural monthly magazine, and the Argentina Observatory of the New School, is a book of multiple voices in a collective conversation on the meaning, options and challenges for the commemoration of the bicentennial of Argentina in 2010, containing chapters by 32 authors including Arjun Appadurai, David Harvey, Juan Corradi, Michael Cohen, Saskia Sassen, Margarita Gutman, First Lady and Senator Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, and Secretary of Culture Jose Nun. Presented by The New School for General Studies.

Panel Discussion
Introduction by Linda Dunne, Dean of The New School for General Studies; Arjun Appadurai, Provost; Michael Cohen, Director, Graduate Program in International Affairs; Juan Corradi, NYU; Margarita Gutman, editor; David Harvey, Graduate Center, CUNY; Héctor Timerman, Consul General of Argentina.

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The Content of Democracy
Webcast
Thursday, April 22, 6:00 p.m.

Nobel Laureate, economist Amartya Kumar Sen, will give this year’s Irene and Bernard L. Schwartz Lecture at New School University. Sen will discuss his recent work on the relation between democracy, human capabilities and economic development. New School University President Bob Kerrey will moderate the event, which is free and open to the public.

Sen is Lamont University Professor Emeritus and Adjunct Professor of Population and International Health in the Department of Population and International Health at Harvard University. Before joining Harvard in 1987, Sen was the Drummond Professor of Political Economy at Oxford University and Fellow of All Souls College. He has also taught at Cambridge University, Jacavpur University in Calcutta, Delhi School of Economics, and the London School of Economics.

Sen’s work is in development economics, the study of welfare of the world’s poorest people. He has studied the Bangladesh famine of 1975 and other catastrophes in India, Bangladesh and the countries of the Sahara. His best-known work, detailed in his 1981 book, Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation, challenges the common view that the shortage of food is the most important explanation of famine. Sen won the 1998 Nobel Prize in economics.

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Critical Themes in Media Studies Student Conference
Keynote Speech: Lev Manovich
Webcast
April 22, 2006

The 6th Annual Critical Themes in Media Studies Graduate Student Conference at The New School will host noted media and cultural studies scholar Lev Manovich (www.manovich.net). Dr. Manovich, an Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego, will present the conference's keynote address. The author of Soft Cinema: Navigating the Database and The Language of New Media as well as recipient of a Mellon Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship, he will present Media, New Media, and Metamedia, his new map of the evolution of digital culture until now with a suggestion of what may come next. His talk will be illustrated with examples drawn from a variety of fields including digital art, motion graphics, architecture, and vernacular computing.

The Critical Themes in Media Studies is an annual event hosted by Department of Media Studies and Film of the New School and the Department of Sociology of the New School for Social Research that presents interdisciplinary, theoretical, and critical approaches to a broad range of media studies. A series of panels will showcase academic presentations by Master and Ph.D. students of The New School and of related graduate programs around the country as well as from abroad. Topics include film theory, pop culture, media and social change, media policy, and gender and discrimination and others.

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Cultural Genocide and Hegemony: Keys to Political, Economic, Religious and Cultural Domination
Audiocast
Monday, February 13, 2006

Martin Mullin, artist and historian, moderator. Panelists: Elizabeth A. Sackler, Founder and President of the American Indian Ritual Object Repatriation Foundation; Greg Tate, editor of Everything But the Burden: What White People are Taking from Black Culture; and Tashi Wangdi, representative in the Americas of the Dalai Lama.Groups intent on the political, economic and religious domination of others most often neutralize the social, economic, and religious traditions of those whom they wish to control. This practice is known as cultural genocide. The panel will discuss the specifics of such actions today in places like Tibet, Cambodia, Rwanda, and Iraq, with historical reference to past events during the Crusades, in Ancient Babylonia, and the Spanish invasion of the Americas. Panelists will probe why this phenomenon still flourishes, its effects on decimated peoples as well as the benefits, if any, to the dominators. This event is part of the Vera List Center’s year-long series of programs devoted to “Considering Forgiveness.” Co-sponsored by the Vera List Center for Art and Politics and the Wolfson Center for National Affairs.

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Don't Panic - A Series of Discussions: On The Couch: Why Do I Feel So Ill?  The Worried Well
Webcast Part 1; Part 2.
Tuesday, November 14, 2007

As part of a four-part series organized by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs at The New School and The New York Salon, this panel discussion will address the National Institute of Mental Health's statement that over one in four adults suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year and that mental illnesses are the leading cause of disability in the U.S. Panelists including Dr. Mike Fitzpatrick, author of MMR and Autism: What Parents Ought to Know, and journalist and UK General Practitioner; John Hewitt, author of The Myth of Self-Esteem: Finding Happiness and Solving Problems in America; and Dr. Sally Satel, PC MD, and author of One Nation Under Therapy.  For further information, please visit The New York Salon website.

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Don't Panic - A Series of Discussions: Parenting: Why Are We Afraid To Let Go?
Webcast Part 1; Part 2; Part 3.
Tuesday, September 19, 2006

As part of a four-part series organized by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs at The New School and The New York Salon, this panel discussion will examine how childhood has come to be viewed as a dangerous time of life, and what are the consequences of insulating children from risk. Panelists include Paula S. Fass, Margaret Byrnes Professor, Department of History, University of California at Berkeley and editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood in History and Society; Nancy McDermott, journalist and member of the Park Slope Parents Group; Sharna Olfman, clinical psychologist and author of Childhood Lost: How American Culture is Failing our Kids; and Peter Stearns, author of Anxious Parents: A History of Modern Childrearing in America and editor of the Journal of Social History. For further information please visit The New York Salon website.

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Dreamland or Nightmare? The Future Development of Coney Island and Its Community
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2
Monday, October 10, 5:00 p.m.- 9:00 p.m.

Coney Island USA, the Wolfson Center for National Affairs and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School present a panel discussion focusing on the role of art and artists in the community development plans currently slated for the Coney Island amusement park area and its surrounding neighborhood. With an eye toward setting a real agenda for including art and community well-being in local development, the panel will address successful and unsuccessful attempts to integrate the arts into expansion plans. By concentrating on the environmental, economic, and restorative power of the arts, we hope to engage the planning process in a slightly wider conversation of local initiatives, city-wide development trends and national case-studies to demonstrate how unique communities such as Coney Island can retain their historical and cultural significance as beneficial partners in their own future economic development.

Panelists: Rikki Abzug, Associate Professor, Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy; Kate Collignon, New York City Economic Development Corporation; Peter Dorsey, Acconci Studio; Robin Nagle, Professor of Urban Anthropology, New York University and author of the forthcoming We All Wear Green: Loading Out with Sanitation Workers in New York; and Anne Pasternak, Director, CreativeTime. Moderator: Aaron Beebe, Curator, Coney Island USA.

This program is co-sponsored by Coney Island USA, the Wolfson Center for National Affairs and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School. For more information call 212.229.2436 or visit The Vera List Center website at www.nsu.newschool.edu/vlc.

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Electing the Next President of the United States: The Mathematics of Electoral College Politics
Webcast
Thursday, January 22, 2004

University President Bob Kerrey will discuss "Electing the New President of the United States: The Mathematics of Electoral College Politics" with U.S. Senator John McCain of Arizona on The conversation is part of a special series featuring prominent members of the major U.S. political parties.

Throughout his public career, John McCain has been a leader in the most critical issues facing our country. He has waged a determined and often solitary campaign against pork barrel spending, fighting for ten years to pass a line item veto. He has been a persistent proponent of lower taxes, genuine deregulation and free trade. He has become one of Congress' most respected voices for a strong national defense, and for sound foreign policy. John McCain served two terms in the House before being elected to the Senate in 1985. He was re-elected to a third Senate term in November 1998.

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Electing the New President of the United States: the Mathematics of Electoral College Politics: Bob Kerrey in Conversation with U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy and Ted Sorensen
Webcast
Monday, March 1, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

New School University President Bob Kerrey will discuss "Electing the New President of the United States: The Mathematics of Electoral College Politics" with U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts and Ted Sorensen, former speech writer and adviser to President John F. Kennedy. The conversation is part of a special series featuring prominent members of the major U.S. political parties. Previous guests on the series have included Governor Bill Richardson of New Mexico and Senator John McCain (R-AZ).

Senator Edward M. Kennedy has represented Massachusetts in the United States Senate since he was first elected in 1962 to finish the term of his brother, President John F. Kennedy. Since then, he has been re-elected seven times, and he is now the second most senior member of the Senate. Throughout his career, Kennedy has fought for issues that benefit the people of Massachusetts and the nation. The effort to bring quality health care to every American is a battle that Kennedy has been waging ever since he arrived in the Senate. Recent achievements include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which makes it easier for those who change their jobs or lose their jobs to keep their health insurance, and the law that created the Children's Health Insurance Program 1997, which makes health insurance more widely available to children in all 50 states. Kennedy is currently a leader in the Senate in the effort to amend Medicare to include a prescription drug benefit for senior citizens.

In addition, Kennedy is active on a wide range of other issues, including all aspects of homeland security and national defense, restoring economic growth and helping the unemployed, improving elementary and secondary schools and making colleges more affordable, raising the minimum wage, defending the rights of workers and their families, strengthening civil rights laws, protecting a woman's right to choose, assisting individuals with disabilities, improving the fairness of our immigration laws, fighting for cleaner water and cleaner air, protecting and strengthening Social Security, and dealing with judicial nominations.

Kennedy is the senior Democrat on the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee in the Senate. He also serves on the Judiciary Committee, where he is the senior Democrat on the Immigration Subcommittee, and the Armed Services Committee, where he is the senior Democrat on the Seapower Subcommittee. He is also a member of the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, a founder of the Congressional Friends of Ireland, and a trustee of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

Ted Sorensen was speechwriter, adviser and legal counsel to John F. Kennedy. He practices international law at the firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkin, Wharton & Garrison.

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Elisabeth Young-Bruehl: Notions of Forgiveness in the Work of Hannah Arendt
Audiocast
Monday, September 19, 6:30 p.m.

Hannah Arendt wrote seven dense, suggestive pages in The Human Condition about “the power to forgive.” In this lecture, Elisabeth Young-Bruehl will comment on Arendt’s reflections and then build upon them, raising questions about the implicit psychology and their political meanings.

Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, a New York-based psychoanalyst, was Hannah Arendt’s doctoral student at The New School and then her biographer. A second edition of Hannah Arendt: For Love of the World has recently been published by Yale University Press.

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Emerging Creative Voices from Pakistan: A Political Context
Audiocast
Tuesday, October 11, 7:30-10:00 p.m.

Karkhana: A Contemporary Collaboration, an exhibition at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, features works by six contemporary Pakistani artists: Aisha Khalid, Hasnat Mehmood, Muhammad Imran Qureshi, Nusra Latif Qureshi, Talha Rathore, and Saira Wasim. At the core of the exhibition is a series of collaboratively-produced paintings initiated as a creative experiment by Muhammad Imran Qureshi in 2003 when he contacted the five other Pakistani painters living in different cities around the world, with the suggestion that each artist start two new paintings made on wasli (rag paper). Each work was then sent to another artist in the group, who applied another layer of imagery, marks, or other processes, and passed it along until all of the artists had added to each of the twelve paintings. These paintings are an experiment in artistic collaboration revealing improvisation, acts of creative destruction, semiotic play, and dynamic adaptation. In this panel, artists and curators involved in the exhibition will discuss the collaborative process, both its history and process, and the ways in which they influence each other and react to visual information already on the paper.

Participants:Aisha Khalid, artist; Hasnat Mehmood, artist; Muhammad Imran Qureshi, artist; Nusra Latif Qureshi, artist; Talha Rathore, artist;Saira Wasim, artist; Desei, Asia Society; Larry Rinder.

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The End of the Bush Era: Re-Finding Our Way on Foreign Policy
Webcast
Thursday, February 9, 2006

Presented by the World Policy Institute at The New School. Panelists: Eric Alterman, WPI Senior Fellow, Media Columnist for The Nation Magazine, Professor of English at Brooklyn College, fellow at Center For American Progress, regular analyst on TV and radio, and author of six books, including When Presidents Lie, and Who Speaks for America? Why Democracy Matters in Foreign Policy; Sherle Schwenninger, WPI Senior Fellow, Fellow at the New America Foundation, former Editor of the World Policy Journal, former Director of the World Policy Institute, regular contributor on global issues to The Nation Magazine and frequent commentator on TV and radio; Kenneth Roth, Executive Director of Human Rights Watch for almost two decades, author of over 70 articles and chapters on different aspects of the human rights struggle, and formerly a federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York. Moderated by Stephen Schlesinger, Director, World Policy Institute.

Most second term presidents have difficult tenures. President Bush's second go-round seems to be suffering that fate, especially in the field of foreign policy. With three years to go, Bush is facing growing confusion and anger among the Americans over the unresolved Iraq war, the nuclear arming of North Korea and Iran, the unfettered spying by the National Security Agency, the fallout from the CIA agent Valerie Palme imbroglio, the claim of unbounded executive power to fight terrorism, the extraordinary and expanding trade imbalance, and America's unpopularity around the globe. At first, Bush's response was that he would moderate his global policies and multilateralize his approach to world issues. His Secretary of State, Condelezza Rice, has pursued a modest course correction, but the president's fundamental attitudes toward the rest of the world appear unchanged. As a most recent example, he gave a recess appointment to a right-wing hardliner as America's envoy to the UN, John Bolton. How will the US conduct its global business over the next three years? Are there alternatives today to Washington's unilateralism? Is the Bush era really at an end? If not, how do progressives survive the final three years? These and related matters will be discussed by the panelists.

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The End of Cooperation: The Economic Costs of American Unilateralism
Webcast

With Jeff Madrick, NY Times Economics Columnist and Editor of Challenge Magazine. Jeff Madrick will inaugurate The NASDAQ Economic Policy Seminar at the Graduate Program for International Affairs at The New School with this lecture, The Seminar is a three-year project supported by the NASDAQ Stock Market Educational Foundation to bring distinguished economic policy practitioners to The New School to examine the kinds of markets and market behaviors that affect national economic performance. Madrick is a contributing economics columnist to The New York Times and editor of Challenge Magazine, a long-standing journal of economic affairs. His most recent book is Why Economies Grow, published by Basic Books. He has also recently started a new journal, Indicators, dedicated to broad measures of the standard of living. He is a regular contributor to several publications, is a frequent guest on television and radio programs, and has authored several books including The End of Affluence and Taking America, both New York Times Notable Books of the Year. This event is free and open to the public.

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Ethics and Debt: Reflections on the Argentine Experience
Tuesday, September 13, 1:00-6:00 p.m.

Four years after the largest sovereign default in history, what lessons can be learned from Argentina? The financial crisis and subsequent debt negotiations caught and held world attention, not only because stakes were so high for Argentina and its creditors alike, but also because the negotiations trod new ground in sovereign debt restructuring. The questions were not only technical, but ethical: What is a fair price for Argentina to pay? Given the depth of the social and economic crisis, is it more ethical for Argentina not to pay its foreign debt? Who is responsible and should therefore shoulder the burden of the crisis?

This symposium is the inaugural program of the Ethics and Debt Project, a joint program of The New School Graduate Program in International Affairs and the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs. The Ethics and Debt project was established to explore the ethical considerations underlying sovereign debt crises by bringing philosophers, economists, practitioners, and policymakers together. This symposium will address these ethical issues as they have played out in Argentina. Participants will discuss the crisis and resolution in hindsight, focusing on the social impacts, industrial recovery, employment, and investment to identify lessons learned.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Introduction Webcast
Michael A. Cohen, Director, Graduate Program in International Affairs and the Argentina Observatory

Keynote Address Webcast
Senator Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, First Lady of Argentina, and Chair, Advisory Committee of the Argentina Observatory

2:00 Webcast
Jose Nun, Secretary of Culture, Republic of Argentina, Jose Serra, Mayor of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and former Minister of Planning, Federal Government of Brazil

3:20 Webcast
The Argentine Crisis and Impacts in Perspective, Chair: Martin Abeles, Director of Argentina Observatory, Economics Working Group; The Social Impact of the Crisis Valeria Esquivel and Roxana Maurizio, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento; The Impact of the Crisis on Production and Investment, Martin Abeles; The Impact of the Crisis on the External Sector, Matias Kulfas, Centro de Economia y Finanzas para el Desarrollo de la Argentina

4:50 Webcast
Concluding Observations and Discussion; Professor Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University; Senator Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner; Bradford Smith, The Ford Foundation; Jose Nun

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Exiting Iraq: Is There Any Strategy?
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Thursday, March 9, 2006

A panel discussion with James H. Nolt, Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute; Rajan Menon, Monroe J. Rathborne Professor of International Relations, Lehigh University and Fellow, New America Foundation; and NIR ROSEN, Fellow, New America Foundation and author of In the Belly of the Green Bird: the Triumph of the Martyrs in Iraq, forthcoming from Simon and Shuster. Moderated by SHERLE R. SCHWENNINGER, Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute.

The Bush administration has made withdrawal of the American forces from Iraq conditional on the building up of an Iraqi army and the establishment of a working government even though these goals appear to be increasingly illusory. Others favor increasing America's commitment of forces, arguing that an American pullout would lead to a full-scale civil war and further chaos, turning Iraq into a haven for terrorists. Yet others contend that the presence of American forces may themselves be a catalyst for the insurgency and a contributing cause of the intensifying civil war, and argue for an American withdrawal. Three knowledgeable experts weigh the merits of these positions and offer their own informed view of the unfolding civil war in Iraq and what the United States should do.
Presented by the World Policy Institute.

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Expectations and Experiences in the Latin American Region
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Audio in English: Part 1; Part 2; Part 3.
Audio in Spanish: Part 1; Part 2; Part 3.
Tuesday, September 19, 2006

A roundtable discussion with political leaders from Latin America to discuss the current political situations in their respective countries.

Panelists: Dr. Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Senator and First Lady of Argentina; Mr. David Choquehuanco, Foreign Minister of Bolivia; Dr. Marcos Aurelio Garcia, Special Advisor on Foreign Affairs to the President of Brazil; Mr. Heraldo Muñoz, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations; and Dr. Bernardo Alvarez Herrera, Ambassador of Venezuela to the United States.

Introductory remarks by: Ben Lee, Provost, The New School; Michael Cohen, Director of the Argentina Observatory and the Graduate Program in International Affairs, The New School; and Margarita Gutman, Associate Professor of Urban Studies and International Affairs, The New School, and Professor, University of Buenos Aires

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Fairness: A Social Research Conference at New School University
Webcasts: Part 1; Part 2.
Thursday, April 14, 6:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Keynote Address: Senator John Edwards, New School University President Bob Kerrey will introduce Senator Edwards and lead a Q&A session following the keynote address.

From the familiar childhood cry of "That's not fair!" to issues of social justice and equality, the concept of fairness is central to our lives. This conference brings together scholars in biology, psychology, economics, political science, law, social policy, international affairs, and public health to examine the roots of our sense of fairness, and consider both the general conditions that give rise to a sense of unfairness and specific historical case studies.

Speakers include: Matthew Rabin, Frans De Waal, Jon Elster, Herbert Gintis, Ira Katznelson, Lawrence Bobo, Sidney Verba, Jennifer Hochschild, Julian Le Grand, Edna Ullman- Margalit, Alan Ryan, Ian Shapiro, Cass Sunstein, Christian Barry, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, Julian Le Grand, and Richard Wilkinson. Moderators: Nicholas Humphrey, Victoria Hattam, Richard Bernstein, and Michael Cohen. Sponsored by Social Research, a publication of the Graduate Faculty of New School University, with generous support from the Russell Sage Foundation. Sponsored by Social Research, a publication of the Graduate Faculty of New School University, with generous support from the Russell Sage Foundation.

John Edwards, 2004 Vice Presidential Candidate, became a United States Senator in 1998. In Congress, he quickly emerged as a champion for the issues that make a difference to American families: quality health care, better schools, protecting civil liberties, preserving the environment, saving Social Security and Medicare, and reforming the ways campaigns are financed. In his career as a lawyer, John Edwards dedicated his career to representing families and children hurt by the negligence of others. Standing up against the powerful insurance industry and their armies of lawyers, John helped these families through the darkest moments of their lives to overcome tremendous challenges.

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Fear: Its Political Uses and Abuses Vice President Al Gore: Keynote address
Thursday, February 5th. Webcast.
Saturday, February 7th. Webcast.
Conference Web site at www.socres.org/fear

We are living at a time, not the first, of collective fear - fear that is encouraged by the U.S. government and exacerbated by the media. This fear has its origins in the shocking events of September 11, which horrified and mesmerized the nation and many across the rest of the world. Over and over, we watched the planes smashing into the World Trade Center towers and the Pentagon, and we saw the buildings collapse, as the tapes were played and replayed endlessly on our television screens. A nation that had seemed impervious to attack from the outside suffered grievously at the hands of a small, determined band of fanatics who saw us as the great Satan. We were no longer invulnerable, and our vulnerability required a swift and decisive action.

This sense of vulnerability and the fear it engendered quickly became the justification for so much that has been done by our government ever since, in the name of protecting us. Two wars have been fought and our constitutional protections have been slashed away at the core, all in the name of fighting terrorism. Now is the time to step back and reflect upon the political uses and abuses of fear. What can we learn from looking at other times in our own history, or in the history of other places, when fear was the order of the day?

Conference sessions will examine issues related to fear. Panels will include: "The Politics of Fear", "Fear and How it Works: Science and Social Science", "The Political Theory and Vocabulary of Fear", "What We Gain, What We Lose: The Effects of Fear", "Case Studies: What Do They Teach Us?" and "Politics of Fear After 9/11: Can The Past Inform The Future?"

The conference brings together leading scholars, journalists and writers including: Cass Sunstein, Karl N. Llewellyn Distinguished Service Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Chicago's Law School; Jessica Stern, lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government; Eric Alterman, contributor to The Nation and MSNBC; Stanley Hoffman, Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard; George Kateb, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics and Director of the Program in Political Philosophy at Princeton University; and others.

About Al Gore As Vice President of the United States, as a presidential candidate in the mind-whirling campaign of 2000, as a congressman, as a Vietnam veteran and a working journalist, Al Gore offers a unique perspective on national and international affairs. As Vice President, Gore's positions included president of the Senate, member of the Cabinet, member of the National Security Council and leader of a wide range of administrative initiatives, including environmental policy,
technology, science, communications and government cost reduction. As a key member of President Clinton's economic team, Mr. Gore was integral to the creation of America's longest period of sustained economic growth. He cast the tie-breaking vote for Senate approval of the first balanced budget in 30 years and, during his tenure, helped to create 18
million new jobs and raise wages at twice the rate of inflation. Acclaimed for his environmental achievements, his pioneering efforts were outlined in the best-selling Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit. Mr. Gore is Vice Chairman of Metropolitan West Financial, LLC, and a member of the Firm's executive leadership team. He is Senior Advisor to Google, Inc. and serves on the Board of Directors of Apple Computers, Inc.

The conference is presented by New School University's Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science and its Social Research journal. Support for the conference has been provided by the Russell Sage Foundation and others.

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Fortress America's Barriers to Global Talent
Webcast
Thursday, April 6, 2006

A panel discussion with Mariam Assefa, Executive Director of World Education Services and 2006; President of NAFSA: Association of International Educators Richard Garnick, President of North American Services, Keane, Inc.; and Michael Panzner, Vice President, Rabo Securities, and author of The New Laws of the Stock Market Jungle: An Insider's Guide to Investing in a Changing World (Prentice Hall, 2005). Moderated by Michele Wucker, World Policy Institute Senior Fellow and Author of Lockout: Why America Keeps Getting Immigration Wrong When Our Prosperity Depends on Getting It Right (Public Affairs, May 2006).

America has long been seen as the destination of choice for the world's best and brightest. But in the past few years, hastily implemented post-9/11 security measures and a long-neglected immigration system created a bottleneck in visa processing. Applications from foreign students to U.S. universities dropped precipitously, and businesses reported a conservative estimate of over $30 billion in losses because of visa delays. Even as the government has worked to resolve bureaucratic glitches, an increasingly rancorous debate over whom to let in to America threatens to undermine our ability to attract global talent. How are these developments affecting America's status as a center of innovation, and what should be done to keep America competitive in face of growing global competition for talent? Presented by The World Policy Institute at The New School.

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The Future of Journalism: The Changing Face of Cable and Broadcast News
Live webcast only; no archive available.
Tuesday, June 12, 2007

In the first of a three-part series focusing on the future of journalism, moderator Professor Stuart H. Loory, Lee Hills Chair in Free Press Studies at the Missouri School of Journalism and director of the Missouri Journalism summer program at The New School in 2007, will look at whether cable and broadcast news are superannuated and if they can save themselves from the clutches of pop culture and keep the public well informed. Loory was a Washington and international correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune, a science writer for The New York Times, White House correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, associate and managing editor of the Chicago Sun-Times, vice president and Washington and Moscow bureau chief for CNN, and general director of TV6 in Moscow, the first independent television station in Russia and a joint venture between Turner Broadcasting System and Moscow Independent Television. Other participants include Marlene Sanders, formerly of ABC and CBS News; William Small, vice chairman for News and Documentaries Emmy Awards, National Television Academy; Richard Roth, United Nations correspondent for CNN.

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The Future of Journalism: Should Political Advertising Have a Future?
Live webcast only; no archive available.
Tuesday, June 26, 2007

With each new election campaign season, political advertising becomes more dominant. One implication is that the candidate who raises the most money can dominate television screens, the Internet, front yards or the printed page with ads that sell an image using the same techniques that sell beer, sleeping pills, or lingerie. In the third of a three-part series focusing on the future of journalism, moderator Professor Stuart H. Loory, Lee Hills Chair in Free Press Studies at the Missouri School of Journalism and director of the Missouri Journalism summer program at The New School in 2007, looks at whether freedom of expression is being stifled by the inability of the public to talk back to an advertisement and if election campaigns are growing too negative. Panelists include Hank Sheinkopf of Sheinkopf Communications, with others participants to be announced.

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The Future of Journalism: Will Newspapers Become Information Geysers?
Live webcast only; no archive available.
Tuesday, June 19, 2007

In the second of a three-part series focusing on the future of journalism, moderator Professor Stuart H. Loory, Lee Hills Chair in Free Press Studies at the Missouri School of Journalism and director of the Missouri Journalism summer program at The New School in 2007, will look at what newspapers of the future will be like and where one will have to go to find them. Will they be on the doorstep in the morning or only on the computer, cell phone, and IPod screens 24/7, and how will their role in society change? Other participants include William E. Casey Jr., vice-president, International, the Wall Street Journal; Seymour Topping, professor emeritus, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, former Pulitzer prize director and former managing editor of the New York Times; Vivian Schiller, New York Times; and James F. Hoge, editor of Foreign Affairs and former publisher of the New York Daily News.

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The Gay Marriage Battle
Webcast
Thursday, June 17, 2004

As Congress weighs in on the debate over gay marriage, Americans face the prospect of a constitutional amendment that will ban such marriages. Has the gay and lesbian community's campaign for marriage been a mistake, as some argue? Why fight for marriage, for many a religious institution, rather than a more value-neutral civil union? Can a society be considered democratic if it allows for inequitable treatment of gays and lesbians because of sexual orientation? What do our laws and especially recent Supreme Court rulings tell us about equality, privacy, marriage, and love? Discussants include Patrick Moore, author of Beyond Shame: Reclaiming the Abandoned History of Radical Gay Sexuality; Lisa Duggan, Professor of History and American Studies, NYU, and author of The Twilight of Equality: Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy; and Nathaniel Frank, New School, Senior Research Fellow, UC-Santa Barbara. Co-moderators: David Groff, co-author of An American Family and Henry Scott, writer, media consultant, and former president and editorial director of Out magazine. Sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs at The New School.

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Gay Sex, Safe Sex: What is to be Done
Webcast
Wednesday, June 22, 2005

Journalist Richard Goldstein with a panel to be announced.
The possible appearance of a new HIV "superstrain" has raised the stakes in the safe-sex debate. How should we respond to these disturbing new findings? This event features a panel of activists exploring the state of gay sexuality from diverse social and cultural perspectives, as well as a presentation by a prominent HIV researcher or epidemiologist. We approach this question with the recognition and appreciation of how cultural factors intersect with scientific and medical developments. Online moderator, Jefferey Wengrofsky. Organized by Richard Goldstein in partnership with the Wolfson Center for National Affairs.

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Globalization, Ethics, and Violence in a Postpolitical Age
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2
Tuesday, October 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Panelists will discuss globalization and ethics and new religious forms in the context of new intensities of violence. The discussion has been inspired by Prof. Faisal Devji’s new book Landscapes of the Jihad: Militancy, Morality, Modernity, released this fall.

The panel will be moderated by Robin Blackburn, The New School, and speakers include:
Provost Arjun Appadurai, The New School, author of Fear of Small Numbers: An Essay on the Geography of Anger (in press) Faisal Devji, The New School, author of Landscapes of the Jihad: Militancy, Morality, Modernity, Allen Feldman, New York University, author of Formations of Violence: The Narrative of the Body and Political Terror in Northern Ireland. Neguin Yavari, Columbia University, author of Counsels of Advice and the Literature of Power (forthcoming) and Nizam al-Mulk Remembered (in press).

This event is sponsored by the South Asia Forum and the Committee on Historical Studies.

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Gov. Howard Dean
Webcast
Friday, March 19, 2004

Gov. Howard Dean will be at New School University on Friday, March 19 to announce his plans for a new grassroots organization. President Kerrey will introduce the Governor.

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The Human Footprint: Has Human Civilization Gone Too Far?
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Tuesday, February 13, 2007

As the third in a four-part series organized by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs and the New York Salon, this panel discussion addresses the role of rational inquiry and science in the debate about the environment. How is it that we have come to perceive ourselves as the biggest threat to our existence rather than as the solution provider and innovator? Speakers to be announced. For more information visit www.nysalon.org. Series concludes on March 20.

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Humanity and Torture: Effective Interrogation or Brutality?
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Wednesday, October 4, 2006

As part of a three-part series on "Humanity and Torture," being sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs at The New School, this panel will address difficult questions in the context of recent controversies about use of torture in interrogations of Al Qaida prisoners and others engaged in or suspected of terrorism since 9/11. As torture appears to become routine in the world in which we live, is there a "torture gene"? If terror is the enemy, is torture the response? Is torture ever morally permissible? The series will continue December 7 and January 24.

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Humanity and Torture: Taxi to the Dark Side
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Wednesday, January 24, 2007

This concluding event in a three-part series presented by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs at The New School exploring the intersection of human nature and politics, focuses on a new documentary film, Taxi to the Dark Side, about U.S. policy and practice with respect to torture. This probing and balanced documentary by Alex Gibney, a leading documentary filmmaker, considers the implications of torture policies nationally and worldwide. Panelists will include key people involved in the project who will discuss the intellectual, political, emotional, and economic considerations, commitments, and challenges they faced. The evening includes a sneak preview of a portion of the film.

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Icarus in the Board Room: Saving American Business from Corporate Corruption
Webcast
Wednesday, June 8, 2005

Panelists: Kurt Eichenwald, New York Times; Donald Glascoff, Jr., Chair, External Advisory Committee, Oxford University Programme in Public Interest Law and Policy; David Skeel, author of Icarus in the Board Room, professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania. Moderator: Martin Fisher, writer and filmmaker.

The disastrous failures of Enron, WorldCom, Global Crossing, and Tyco directly injured tens of thousands of working and retired people as well damaging the U.S. economy. Then, just as anxiety over mercurial, and fraudulent, manipulation of stock prices was fading, investors were faced with new scandals at Marsh & McLennan. David Skeel's recent book is a fascinating history of U.S. corporate giants who flew too high and fell out of the sky when their wings melted. The panel probes present practices, ethics, and temptations of hubris in U.S. corporate culture, highlighting potential dangers to American business. How urgent is it to repair our business management culture before the next Icaran debacle? Sponsored by the Rose and Erwin Wolfson Center for National Affairs.

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Inaugural Conference: Cities in a World of Migration: India and China in Global Perspective
Friday, April 28, 2006 and Saturday, April 29, 2006
ICI will hold their inaugural conference Cities in a World of Migration: India and China in Global Perspective. The keynote speaker is Joseph R. Biden, Jr., U.S. Senator from Delaware and former chair of the Foreign Relations Committee.

SCHEDULE & WEBCAST INFO: FRIDAY

9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Opening Address
Webcast
Bob Kerrey President, The New School; Aarjun Appadurai Provost, Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs, The New School; Conference Co-Chair.

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Session I: Dynamics
Webcast
What are the dynamic roles of cities in India, China and the United States? How have they evolved from local, national and global perspectives? Chair: Benjamin LeeDean, The New School for Social Research; Conference Co-Chair Panelists: Shahid Yusuf, Economic Advisor, World Bank Development Research Group Aromar Revi, Director, Taru Leading Edge; ICI Fellow Kongjian Yu Dean and Professor, Graduate School of Landscape Architecture, Peking University; President, Turenscape; Alex F. Schwartz, Associate Professor of Urban Policy, Milano The New School for Managment and Urban Policy Chair, Urban Policy Analysis and Management Program.

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Session II: Circulation
Webcast
How do we understand the dynamics of urban and rural migration in both directions? Chair: Aristide Zolberg, Director, International Center for Migration, Ethnicity & Citizenship: Panelists: Arjun Appadurai, Provost, Vice President of Academic Affairs, The New School; Conference Co-Chair Yang Yao Professor, China Center for Economic Research at Peking University; ICI Fellow Partha Mukhopadhyay Economist; ICI Fellow Eiko Ikegami, Professor, Sociology, The New School for Social Research.

6:00 p.m. Inaugural Conference
Webcast
Keynote address by Joseph R. Biden Jr., United States Senator, Delaware


SCHEDULE & WEBCAST INFO: SATURDAY


10:00 am-11:30 am Session III: Governance & Planning
Webcast
Cities in India, China, and the United States typically emerge out of different long-term physical and political environment. How do these differences affect our approaches to urban governance and planning?

Chair: Michael Cohen, Director, Graduate Program in International Affairs, The New School for General Studies; Panelists: K.C. Sivaramakrishnan, Visiting Professor, Centre for Policy Research; Senior Fellow, Institute of Social Sciences, New Delhi; Zuojun Yang Senior Urban Planner, Hangzhou Urban Planning Bureau; ICI Fellow; Dilip DaCunha, Faculty, Parsons The New School of Design; Professor of Architecture and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania.

11:30 am-12:15 pm Information Knowledge Tools: Understanding Differences
Webcast
William Bevington, Executive Director, Parsons Institute for Informational Mapping; Robert G. Pietrusko, Senior Design Engineer, Parsons Institute for Informational Mapping; Brian McGrath Special Advisor/Consultant, India China Institute; Vyjayanthi Rao, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, The New School for Social Research; Assistant Professor, Graduate Program in International Affairs, The New School for General Studies.

1:15 pm - 3:00 pm Session IV: Dwelling & Development
Webcast
How is the real estate market responding? Can people be regulated? What is the social impact of new housing and infrastructure developments? Chair: Bob Kerrey, President, The New School; Panelists: Keith Abell, Co-Chairman, Tishman Speyer GSC; Chairman, GSC Asia; Sheela Patel, Director, Society for Promotion of Area Resource Centres; Paul Goldberger, Dean, Parsons The New School for Design.

3:30pm-5:00pm Session V: Imagining the Future
This session will address both the opportunities and the constraints for imagining democratic futures in the emerging cities in the world. Chairs: Jonathan Bach, Associate Director, Graduate Program in International Affairs, The New School for General Studies; Panelists: Guang Yu Ren, Architect and Heritage Consultant; Vyjayanthi Rao, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, The New School for Social Research; Assistant Professor, Graduate Program in International Affairs, The New School for General Studies; Keller easterling Associate Professor of Architecture, Yale University.

5:00pm-5:30pm Closing Remarks
Arjun Appadurai, Provost, Vice President of Academic Affairs, The New School; Conference Co-Chair.

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The Inaugural William Phillips Lecture
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2
.
Wednesday, March 8, 2006

Cynthia Ozick: The Rights of History and the Rights of Imagination
The New School for Social Research announces the establishment of an endowed lectureship to commemorate the remarkable life and work of William Phillips, the founding co-editor of Partisan Review. He remained at the helm of the fiercely independent magazine from 1934 until his death in 2002. Cynthia Ozick, one of the most revered American novelists and critics alive today, will give the first annual lecture, “The Rights of History and the Rights of Imagination.”

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India & China: Who's Ahead?
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Friday, February 3, 2006

Is it fair to argue that China is unequivocally superior to India in terms of economic, political, social and diplomatic matters? Join a dialogue with three authors, Bruce Gilley, Yasheng Huang, and Joydeep Mukherji, of the newly released Asia's Giants: Comparing China and India (2006) facilitated by Arjun Appadurai and Benjamin Lee. These authors discuss essays that argue conventional wisdom for comparing India and China is overly simplified if not outright wrong.

This event is the latest of the India China Institute's Revisioning India and China: Authors and Artists series. The event is co-sponsored by the Graduate Program in International Affairs, South Asia Forum, and the World Policy Institute.

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Institutional and Social Reform in Argentina
First Lady of Argentina, Senator Cristina Fernández de Kirchner
Webcast
Thursday, February 12, 2004
*The Conference will be in Spanish

Cristina Fernández de Kirchner is one of the most influential political leaders in the current Argentine administration. In addition to carrying out her duties as First Lady, she is currently serving her second term as Senator from southern province of Santa Cruz. As such, she chairs the Committee of Constitutional Affairs of the Argentine Senate and is a key member of the Committee on the Judiciary. Over the last 15 years, Fernández de Kirchner has occupied different positions in both the provincial and national legislative branches, including acting as representative to the National Constitutional Assembly in 1994.

According to a number of polls, Senator Fernández de Kirchner has one of the highest approval ratings among Argentine leaders, second only to her husband, President Néstor Kirchner. She has developed an intense national and international agenda of her own, focused on human rights, institutional reforms, freedom of expression and constitutional affairs.

From her seat in the Senate, Senator Fernández de Kirchner has played a key role in carrying out the institutional reforms of the new administration. During its first six months, the government and the Congress dismantled the body of laws and presidential decrees that have shielded the armed forces from criminal prosecution for human rights abuses committed during the Dirty War in Argentina, which lasted from 1976-83. In July 2003, the Government revoked the amnesty laws passed in 1986 and 1987 that had protected members of the former military regime from prosecution. In addition, the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate, of which Senator Fernández de Kirchner is a member, has removed the two members of the Supreme Court appointed by former President Carlos Menem.

Senator Fernández de Kirchner was born on February 19, 1953, and is married to Néstor Kirchner, who has been president of Argentina since May 25, 2003.

The Kirchners have two children. Both Senator and President Kirchner have been prominent members of the Peronist Party since the 1970s. When a military coup overthrew the constitutional government in 1976 and began to carry out state-sponsored terrorism, the Kirchners took refuge in Mr. Kirchner's hometown. During the remainder of the dictatorship, which ended in 1983, they focused on their law practice. This event is sponsored by the Argentina Observatory at The New School. 

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Is the Sky Falling? Challenging the Conventional Economic Wisdom
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2; and Part 3.
Friday, March 9, 2007

A panel discussion presented by The New School and the Bernard Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis. (SCEPA)

Conventional wisdom suggests that the deficits are too high, personal savings rates too low, federal government spending is out of control, and too much of our debt is held by foreign governments.  But do we know with any confidence when these imbalances become unsustainable?  Do we have a realistic estimate of the true ‘tipping points’ or has a Chicken Little way of thinking clouded our view of America’s economic prospects?  Will the popular remedies, such as cutting federal spending and trade protection, do more harm than good?

New School president Bob Kerrey and a group of prominent economists, business leaders, and policy shapers examine the conventional wisdom and discuss policies to enhance America’s economic prospects.

Participants include:

Brad DeLong, Professor of Economics, University of California at Berkeley
Robert Hormats, Vice Chairman, Goldman Sachs International and Managing Director, Goldman Sachs & Co.
Larry Kudlow, host of CNBC's "Kudlow & Company"
Julie Kosterlitz, Staff Correspondent, National Journal
Bernard Schwartz, Chairman and CEO of BLS Investments, LLC and
Retired Chairman and CEO, Loral Space & Communications
Dr. Robert J. Shapiro, Chairman, Sonecon, LLC and former Under Secretary of Commerce
Robert Solow
, Institute Professor Emeritus of Economics, MIT and 
Nobel Prize Winner

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Is Secularism Dead? Prospects for nonbelief in the 21st Century
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Tuesday, September 27, 6:00 p.m.

Jacques Berlinerblau, visiting professor, Georgetown University; Susan Jacoby, director of the Center for Inquiry-Metro New York and author of Freethinkers; Margaret Steinfels, co-director, Fordham Center on Religion and Culture. The sacred has returned to the public sphere. In a recent book, The Secular Bible: Why Nonbelievers Must Take Religion Seriously, sociologist and biblical scholar Jacques Berlinerblau describes a malaise afflicting contemporary secular intellectual culture: The storied secular thinkers of yesteryear, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Durkheim, Weber, Russell, Sartre, to name but a few, are long dead, and no comparable cadre has come to replace them. How do we define "secular"? Where are the contemporary secular movements? How do we examine the secular beyond simply revisiting the church/state boundary disputes? What is the post-modern critique of the secular? Using Berlinerblau's assessment of contemporary secularism, we inquire about political and cultural possibilities open to nonbelievers in the 21st century. Sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs at The New School.

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James K. Galbraith
Modern Economic Predation: War, Corporate Fraud and the Cruel Chimera of Labor Market Reform

Webcasts: Part 1; Part 2.
Monday, February 13, 7:00 p.m.

Join us as we inaugurate the first Robert L. Heilbroner Memorial Lecture. Heilbroner wrote, “Capitalism’s uniqueness in history lies in its continuously self-generated change, but it is this very dynamism that is the system’s chief enemy.” It is in appreciation of what he identified as “the deep human need to be situated with respect to the future” that The New School launches a lecture series in Heilbroner’s memory that focuses on capitalism’s future.

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Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Laureate, to discuss new book: The Roaring Nineties
Webcast

Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Prize-winning economist and author, will discuss his new book The Roaring Nineties: A New History of the World's Most Prosperous Decade.

In The Roaring Nineties, Stiglitz casts a critical eye on the U.S., and debunks the myths of the New Economy that informed - and continues to inform - our understanding of this period of unprecedented economic growth. This event is presented by the Economics Department of the Graduate Faculty.

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Journalism: Media Perspectives of a Global Generation
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Wednesday, April 5, 2006

As the news industry faces unprecedented changes, this panel explores how 21st-century technology and human migration complicate and enrich the media landscape. Journalism’s future will be seen through three key questions: How will the generation gap between print traditionalists and new media pioneers play out in the future of news collection, distribution, and consumption? Why does the shrinking distance between the “local” and the “global” require more cross-cultural insight in U.S. newsrooms? What happens in a world where news and commentary are regularly unhinged from a fixed locale, where one can read, listen to, or watch media from any part of the world while in any part of the world? A mix of young journalists from mainstream, ethnic, and international outlets discuss how their answers to these questions influence their story ideas, news content, reportorial and editorial worldviews, and audiences. Moderated by Corey Takahashi, freelance journalist (Newsday, VIBE, NPR,etc.); guest journalists to be announced. Co-sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs and the Department of Media Studies and Film.

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Journalism Under Fire: The View from the Newsroom (Part 1 of 4)
Webcast
Tuesday, June 6, 2006

Two veteran editors talk about what it is like back in the newsroom
when the news is the kidnapping and murder of one of their own
reporters: Paul Steiger, managing editor of the Wall Street Journal and
vice president of Dow Jones, and Barney Calame, public editor of The New
York Times and former deputy managing editor of the Wall Street Journal.
This four-part series is co-sponsored by The New School and the
Missouri School of Journalism New York Program. A reception follows each
event.

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Journalism Under Fire: Aren't Women Citizens? (Part 2 of 4)
Webcast
Tuesday, June 13, 2006

How and why are women and their perspectives underrepresented in news stories and in the newsroom, in this country and around the world? Sheila Gibbons, vice president of Communications Research Associates and co-author of Taking Their Place: A Documentary History of Women and Journalism; Carol Jenkins, Emmy award-winning news anchor and correspondent, founding member and now on Board of Advisors of the Women's Media Center. Moderated by Geneva Overholser, professor and Curtis B. Hurley Chair of Public Affairs Reporting, Missouri School of Journalism. This four-part series is co-sponsored by The New School and the Missouri School of Journalism New York Program. A reception follows each event.

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Journalism Under Fire: Writers Taking the News Personally (Part 3 of 4)
Webcast
Tuesday, June 20, 2006

Reporters sometimes become part of their own stories. Three writers talk about the risks and advantages of inserting their own voices and viewpoints: Walt Harrington, professor of literary journalism, University of Illinois, and author of The Beholder's Eye, widely used in writing classes; Mike Sager, visiting writer at the University of California-Irvine and writer-at-large for Esquire whose collected essays, Scary Monsters and Super Freaks: Stories of Sex, Drugs, Rock 'n' Roll and Murder, was an LA Times bestseller; moderator Mary Kay Blakely, associate professor, Missouri School of Journalism, and writer for Ms., The New York Times, Mother Jones, Life, and Vogue, and author of Red, White and Oh So Blue, Memoir of a Political Depression. This four-part series is co-sponsored by The New School and the Missouri School of Journalism New York Program. A reception follows each event.

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Journalism Under Fire: Covering the Holes in History (Part 4 of 4)
Webcast
Tuesday, June 27, 2006

Photojournalists talk about the real dangers they face in the field and what happens when their images are censored by editors and governments: Lois Raimondo, photojournalist for the Washington Post, whose pictures and stories have also appeared in The New York Times, Life, Newsweek, and Time; other panelists to be announced. Moderated by Jan Colbert, assistant professor, Missouri School of Journalism. This four-part series is co-sponsored by The New School and the Missouri School of Journalism New York Program. A reception follows each event.

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Leading Edge in Policy Choices for Human Development Lecture Series
Joseph Stiglitz: Making Globalization Work

Webcast
Tuesday, December 5, 2006

Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz will discuss his book, Making Globalization Work. He puts forward radical new ways of dealing with the crippling indebtedness of developing countries, recommends a new system of global reserves to overcome international financial instability, and provides new proposals for addressing the current impasse in dealing with global warming and for reforming global institutions to make them truly capable of responding to the problems of our age.

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Learn the Do's and Dont's of Running a Successful Business
Webcast

Crain's New York Business and the Milano Graduate School teamed up and presented a conversation with Stacy Pecor, founder of Olive & Bette's, a chic NYC boutique chain and a thriving web site. Stacy discussed how she overcame obstacles as a startup and how she's achiveved financial success in the rough and tumble NYC retail business.

A team of business experts assembled from the Milano Graduate School, including Dean Fred Hochberg, Martin Greller, Milano professor and chair of the Human Resources Management Program and Mark Lipton, Milano professor and chair of the Organizational Change Management Program, looked at this exciting case study and made their suggestions and comments.

Alair Townsend, publisher of Crain's New York Business, moderated this evening.

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Living in a State of Fear
Webcast
Tuesday, March 20, 2007

The last in a four-part series organized by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs and the New York Salon, this panel discussion addresses all of today’s doomsday scenarios, from oil depletion and global warming to the danger of bad parenting, all of which emphasize human culpability and vulnerability. These days, human ingenuity is regarded with apprehension and even fear. What are the consequences for the future of civilization? How we view humanity matters but is the future human? Speakers to be announced. For more information please visit www.nysalon.org.

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Log Cabin
Webcast
Saturday, February 26, 3:00 p.m.

The current exhibition at Artists Space entitled "Log Cabin" features diverse artistic strategies that examine the impact of neo-conservatism on queer representations in America. Through explorations of alienation and social ghettoization, to neo-conservative tendencies within the queer community, “Log Cabin” stimulates dialogue about the shift in queer vernaculars provoked by the current political climate. This symposium/panel discussion held in conjunction with the exhibition includes curators Jeffrey Uslip and Christian Rattemeyer in conversation with Richard Meyer, art historian, University of Southern California; artist Allison Smith and others. Presented by Artists Space in collaboration with The Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School.

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Mannes Downtown - Chamber Music at the New School
The New School and Mannes College The New School of Music present a chamber music concert series at the Lang Center. The Wednesday afternoon concerts will feature outstanding student ensembles from Mannes.

Performers
Franck: Svetlana Tsoneva, violin; Matei Varga, piano
Brahms tracks: Joanne Kim, clarinet; David Himmelheber, cello; Ilya Yakushev, piano

Audiocast
Wednesday, October 26, 2005
An archived version of the audio cast will be available after the live event.
You will need the free Real Player to listen to the webcast.

Franck Sonata, 1st movement
Franck, 2nd movement
Franck, first part of 3rd movement
Franck, end of 3rd movement and 4th movement
Brahms trio, 1st movement
Brahms, 2nd movement
Brahms, 3rd & 4th movements

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Mannes Downtown- Chamber Music at the New School
The New School and Mannes College The New School of Music present a chamber music concert series at the Lang Center. The Wednesday afternoon concerts will feature outstanding student ensembles from Mannes.

Audiocast
Wednesday, November 9, 2005, 1:00 - 2:00p.m.

Lieder, Franz Schubert
Auf dem Wasser zu singer, D. 774 (Stolberg)
Der Tod und das Macdchen, D. 531 (Claudius)
Die Forelle, D. 550 (C.F.D. Schubart)

Schubert Quintet in A major, D. 667
Allegro vivace
Scherzo: Presto-Trio
Theme and Variations: Andantino
Allegro giusto

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Mannes Downtown- Chamber Music at the New School
The New School and Mannes College The New School of Music present a chamber music concert series at the Lang Center. The Wednesday afternoon concerts will feature outstanding student ensembles from Mannes. Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Audiocasts
Summer Music Op. 31, Samuel Barber, 1931
Seung-Yeon Tae, flute
Maria Plotkin, clarinet
Jennifer Scott, oboe
Sasha Gee Enegren, bassoon
Yun-Hsuan Lin, horn
Coached by Judith Mendenhall

Sonata for Bassoon and Piano in G Major, Op. 168, Camille Saint-Saëns
Allegretto moderto
Allegro scherzando
Molto adagio - Allegro moderato
Natalie Pilla, bassoon
Evelyn Jundt, piano
Coached by Alvin Brehm

Six Bagatelles, György Ligeti
Allegro con spirito
Rubato - Lamentoso
Allegro grazioso
Presto ruvido
Adagio - Mesto (Bela Bartok in memoriam)
Molto vivace - Capriccioso
Travis Huebel, flute
Ben Ringer, clarinet
Ben Cadwallader-Staub, oboe
Daniel Hofman, horn
Stephen Sisto, bassoon
Coached by Judith Mendenhall

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Marcia Tucker Memorial Tribute
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Friday, January 12, 2007

The New Museum of Contemporary Art in association with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School will hold a memorial tribute to the late Marcia Tucker, founding director of the New Museum. A visionary curator without resources or a collection, Marcia Tucker founded the New Museum of Contemporary Art in 1977 at The New School, at the invitation of the late philanthropist and New School Trustee Vera List. Tucker’s model for a museum dedicated to exhibiting the work of emerging and under-recognized artists defied conventional practices of the art world at that time, and launched a potent and enduring international model for the exhibition of contemporary art in a museum context. In 1983, the New Museum moved to larger premises in SoHo, and will open its new building on the Bowery in the fall of 2007.

As director of the New Museum from 1977 to 1999, Marcia Tucker organized such polemical exhibitions as Bad Painting (1978) and Bad Girls (1994) and presided over the first museum exhibitions of John Baldessari, Christian Boltanski, Barry Le Va, Ana Mendieta, Carolee Schneeman, and David Wojnorowicz. She was also the series editor of Documentary Sources in Contemporary Art, influential books of theory and criticism published by the New Museum. Tucker was the 1999 recipient of the Bard College Award for Curatorial Achievement, and received the ArtTable Award for Distinguished Service to the Visual Arts in 2000. For more information, visit www.newmuseum.org.

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The Marshall McLuhan Lecture
Webcast
Wednesday, February 18, 2004

The 2004 McLuhan Lecture will be delivered by Harper's Magazine editor Lewis P. Lapham. Mr. Lapham wrote the introduction to the M.I.T. edition of Marshall McLuhan's classic Understanding Media, and is the author of numerous essays and ten books, including Money and Class in America, Waiting for the Barbarians, and Theater of War. Following the lecture, Lewis Lapham will engage in a public conversation with Canadian Consul Pamela Wallin.

The Marshall McLuhan Lecture celebrates the intellectual heritage of the Canadian visionary who coined the phrase "the medium is the message." In keeping with McLuhan's own analogical method of inquiry, the lecture draws on contemporary innovative thinkers in a wide range of fields. Past McLuhan lectures have been delivered by Tom Wolfe, Camille Paglia, Jerry Brown, Alan Kay, and Atom Egoyan.

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Mexico’s Perilous Presidential Election
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Thursday, April 20, 2006

A panel discussion with Julia Preston, a member of The New York Times team that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for international affairs reporting in Mexico, and co-author of Opening Mexico: The Making of a Democracy (Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 2004); Jorge Pinto, former Mexican consul general, director of Pace University's Center for Global Finance, and columnist for El Universal; and Maurico Font, director of the Bildner Center for Western Hemisphere Studies at CUNY and author of several books and essays on Latin America. Moderated by Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute.

On July 2, Mexico will hold one of the most critical presidential elections in its history. Will the country return to the PRI, the party that dominated the government for seven decades until Vincente Fox's surprise victory in 2000; or will it complete its transition to a true, multi-party democracy? Three men are furiously vying for the position and, according to polls, are separated by only a few percentage points. Which caudillo will lead Mexico into the future -- and in what direction? Would a win by populist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador be yet another sign that Latin America is turning Left? And where does Zapatista Subcomandante Marcos' "Other Campaign" fit into the picture? Panelists will discuss these and other related issues about modern Mexico.

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Milano and the Center for New York City Affairs present GOVERNING CHANGE: Policy, Politics and the Spitzer Administration
Webcasts Tuesday, December 12, 2006

The New York State Governor’s Office is about to change hands and parties for the first time in 12 years. The new administration is likely to represent a seismic shift from the current one, not just in terms of party and ideology, but also in terms of management approaches, leadership styles, and appointments. On Tuesday, December 12, from 8:00 a.m. through 2:30 p.m., Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy and the Center for New York City Affairs in co-sponsorship with the New York Times will bring together leading experts to foster fresh perspectives and new insights into the key policy challenges now facing New York State.

Four panels will cover health care/Medicaid, affordable housing, public education/campaign for fiscal equity settlement, and government reform. Speakers include Norman Adler, Bolton-St. Johns; Gerald Benjamin, SUNY New Paltz; Howard Berliner, Milano; Eric Bluestone, Bluestone Organization; Olveen Carrasquillo, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Michael Cooper, New York Times; Jennifer Cunningham, SEIU/1199; Shaun Donovan, NYC Dept. of Housing Preservation & Development; David Herszenhorn, New York Times; Blair Horner, NYPIRG; Gene Keilin, KPS Special Situations Funds; Eduardo LaGuerre, Neighborhood Association for Intercultural Affairs; Geri Palast, Campaign for Fiscal Equity; Richard Perez-Pena, New York Times; Ken Raske, Greater NY Hospital Association; Hon. Eric Schneiderman, New York State Senate; Janny Scott, New York Times; Hon. Malcolm Smith, New York State Senate; Meryl Tisch, New York State Board of Regents; Randi Weingarten, United Federation of Teachers; and Emily Youssouf, NYC Housing Development Corporation This event is made possible by generous support of Edison Properties and the Milano Foundation.

WEBCASTS:

View part 1 archive: Welcoming Remarks
Fred P. Hochberg, Dean, Milano
Paul Francis, Budget Director, Office of
Governor-elect Eliot Spitzer

View part 2 archive: Panel I: Affordable Housing
Overview of the issues facing the state
Emily Youssouf, President, New York City Housing Development Corporation and Member, Milano Board of Governors
Discussion
Eric Bluestone, Partner, The Bluestone Organization
Commissioner Shaun Donovan, NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development
Eduardo LaGuerre, CEO, Neighborhood Association for Intercultural Affairs
Moderator
Janny Scott, Reporter, The New York Times

View part 3 archive: Panel II: Health Care and Medicaid
Overview of the issues facing the state
Howard Berliner, Professor, Milano
Discussion
Dr. Olveen Carrasquillo, Principal Investigator, Columbia Center for the Health of Urban Minorities, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
Jennifer Cunningham, Executive Director, SEIU New York State Council, and Executive Vice President for Politics and Legislation, 1199 SEIU
Patricia Wang, Senior Vice President, Finance and Managed Care, Greater NY Hospital Association
Moderator
Richard Pérez-Peña, Reporter, The New York Times

View part 4 archive: Panel III: Government Reform
Overview of the issues facing the state
Gerald Benjamin, Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, SUNY New Paltz
Discussion
Norman Adler, President, Bolton-St. Johns
Blair Horner, Legislative Director, NYPIRG
Moderator
Michael Cooper, Albany Bureau Chief, The New York Times

View part 5 archive: Luncheon Conversation
Discussion
Hon. James Florio, Former Governor of New Jersey
Hon. William Weld, Former Governor of Massachusetts
Moderator
Fred P. Hochberg, Dean, Milano

View part 6 archive: Panel IV: Public Education and CFE
Overview of the issues facing the state
Meryl Tisch, Member, New York State Board of Regents
Discussion
Geri Palast, Executive Director, Campaign for Fiscal Equity
Randi Weingarten, President, United Federation of Teachers
Moderator
David Herszenhorn, Reporter, The New York Times

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The Neoliberal Agenda for the Future of Science
Webcast
Thursday, February 1, 2007

The second Robert Heilbroner Memorial Lecture sponsored by The Bernard Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis. (SCEPA)

Join us for the second annual Robert Heilbroner Memorial Lecture. Heilbroner wrote, “Capitalism’s uniqueness in history lies in its continuously self-generated change, but it is this very dynamism that is the system’s chief enemy.” It is in appreciation of what he identified as “the deep human need to be situated with respect to the future” that The New School sponsors a lecture series in Heilbroner’s memory that focuses on capitalism’s future.

Featuring: Philip Mirowski, Carl Koch Chair of Economics and the History and Philosophy of Science, University of Notre Dame.

Philip Mirowski's areas of specialization are in the history and philosophy of economics, with subsidiary areas in evolutionary computational economics, the economics of science, science studies and the history of the natural sciences. His most recent books are Machine Dreams (Cambridge, 2001) and the edited volumes The Collected Economic Works of William Thomas Thornton (5.vols., Pickering & Chatto, 1999) and (with Esther-Mirjam Sent) Science Bought and Sold (Chicago, 2001). His work has been the subject of a conference at Duke University (proceedings published as Non-Natural Economics edited by Neil de Marchi) and the subject of one of the profiles in Michael Szenberg, ed., Passion and Craft. A frequent visiting professor in Europe, his book More Heat than Light (1989) has been translated into French.

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Nestor Kirchner, President of Argentina
Webcast: SpanishEnglish.

The newly-elected President of Argentina, Nestor Kirchner, will visit the New School University at the invitation of the Graduate Program in International Affairs to inaugurate The Argentina Observatory. The program will begin at about 1:45pm and end by 3pm, and will include introductory remarks by New School University President, Bob Kerrey, by Michael Cohen, Director the Graduate Program in International Affairs, First Lady Senator Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, President Kirchner, and Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz. It will be webcast live and shown in Room 404 of 66 West 12th Street. The President and First Lady will speak in Spanish.

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Open Source on the Line
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Monday, December 4, 2006

With their vast popularity, "open-source" platforms on the Internet are becoming a contested terrain. As part of its series, "The Public Domain," The Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School in association with Rhizome.org presents a panel discussion featuring Daniel Mayer, CFO, Wikipedia; Cory Arcangel, artist; and others to be announced, who will discusses the possible effects of online platforms like Wikipedia and del.icio.us on culture and offline systems of knowledge, as well as addressing such current challenges to open-source principles as "net neutrality."

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The Parallax of Evil: Domination and Hegemony
A Public Dialogue with Jean Baudrillard and Sylvère Lotringer.
Webcast: Part 1 Part 2
Friday, November 4, 6:00-7:30pm

Internationally known outlaw sociologist and philosopher, Jean Baudrillard has consistently managed to be misunderstood over the last thirty-five years. Secretly inspired by his intellectual mentors, Alfred Jarry and Antonin Artaud, he has challenged all existing theories of contemporary society with an implacable humor and precision. A visionary of the present, uncompromising in every respect, he still is widely considered a pessimist and a nihilist, an agent provocateur, a dandy, a traitor, a shame for the profession. And there is a good reason for that: a Marxist (he worked with Henri Lefebvre), a fellow-traveler of the Situationists, inspired by May '68, he early on renounced the theory of alienation/liberation, proclaimed the end of production, dismissed critical theory as complicitous to the system, even presented the inertia of the masses as last-ditch resistance. Worse yet, he dared move resistance to the other side, claiming that only the system itself could bring its own demise, reversing gift (Marcel Mauss) into a counter-gift, exchange into sacrifice, time into cycle, life into death. Early on, in light of primitive cultures, Baudrillard’s analysis of Consumer Society (1972) demonstrated that the society of spectacle was turning into a simulation of itself, ending representation. From Symbolic Exchange and Death (1966) to The Transparency of Evil (1990), The Perfect Crime (1994) and The Impossible Exchange (1999), he conceived of theoretical violence as a radical weapon, forcing the emergence of a new type of symbolic exchange (challenge, reversion, death) in a world in which a global hegemony had replaced traditional domination (the master-slave relation). In his public dialogue with Sylvere Lotringer, Baudrillard will ironically return to Marx’s famous formula that history repeats itself as a farce: the integral exchange of hegemony is cannibalizing its own reality, unleashing a carnavalesque escalation that now affects every sector of contemporary life, politics, fashion, media, art.

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Paul Krugman: What Went Wrong?
Webcast

New School University Graduate Faculty presents the Irene and Bernard Schwartz lecture series: Critical Thinking on Constructive Capitalism. Moderated by Bob Kerrey, President, New School University. Paul Krugman, New York Times columnist, and award-winning Princeton University economist, is one of the leading thinkers on economic issues and the current state of American fiscal and foreign policy. His lecture will look at rising economic inequality in the U.S. and the future of American politics.

Generously supported by Irene and Bernard L. Schwartz, this Lecture Series is part of the Program in Markets, Equality and Democracy, aimed at undestanding the legal, institutional and cultural conditions under which the profit-seeking activities of private firms serve broader social goals in a global economy.

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Performance and Screening: Laurie Anderson, Herself
Webcast
Tuesday, April 12, 2005

Laurie Anderson is recognized worldwide for her innovative and groundbreaking work with technologically vanguard instruments in the arts. As an artist with a vast collection of work, she has published six books, produced nuberous videos, films and radio pieces, and created orchestral work. She recently collaborated with Silicon Valley-based Interval Research Corporation to explore new creative tools including the Talking Stick, a wireless musical instrument that emits sound when touched.

Please join us for a very special evening of her work in retrospect, including a special screening of her latest media work, Hidden Inside Mountains.Hidden Inside Mountains, commissioned by EXPO 2005 Aichi, Japan, is a high definition film that debuted on March 25, 2005 in Japan at EXPO 2005 on the largest high definition Astrovision screen in the world. An original score has been created by Laurie Anderson and mastered in stereo in 5.1. Hidden Inside Mountains is a film of short stories about nature, artifice and dreams. Located in a fictitious world of theatrical spaces, the stories unfold through music, gesture, text and the poetry of visual images. The film's haunting music features violins, bells, dog barks and melody as well as many electronic sounds. Both joy and loss are caught in this film in Japanese and English. Running time is 25 minutes.

Written and Directed: Laurie Anderson
Produced: Cheryl Kaplan
Executive Producer: Linda Brumbach
Director of Photography: Maryse Alberti
Hidden Inside Mountains: A production of Canal Street Communications, Inc. © 2005 Canal Street Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Performance and Screening: Sound and Spatialization
Webcast
Thursday, April 21, 2005

Hosted by: Barry Salmon, Composer and Media Studies Core Faculty Member. An evening exploring the experimental uses of audio, featuring performances by and conversations with audio artists:

Alvin Lucier: I am Sitting in a Room
Tom Hamilton: London Fix (Honorary Mention, Prix Ars Electronica, 2004)
Chris Mann: dunno how to get there but wouldn't start from here (Commissioned by Berliner Festspiele, 2005)

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Politics of Resistance
Webcast: Part 1 Part 2
Thursday, March 16, 6:00 p.m., 2006

Politics of Resistance features four books and four authors: Stanley Aronowitz (How Class Works), Stephen Bronner (Blood in the Sand), Frances Fox Piven (The War at Home), and Cornel West (Democracy Matters) engaging in a conversation which begins with a critique of American foreign and domestic policy. Sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs.

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Politics - Not as Usual: Investigative Journalism in an Election Year
Webcast
Tuesday, June 8, 2004

Are the voters receiving the information they need to make crucial decisions? What do we really know about the 2004 presidential candidates? What do they want us to know? When is the spin spun without challenge? When is it exposed? With the Democrats soon to convene in Boston and the Republican National Convention preparing to meet in New York, this series of distinguished speakers explores the media and the message of the political campaigns. Co-sponsored by The New School and The Missouri School of Journalism.

Jill Abramson, managing editor, New York Times; Neal Shapiro, President, NBC News; and James Steele, investigative reporter, Time magazine; moderator, Brant Houston, Executive Director, Investigative Reporters and Editors, Assoc. Professor, Missouri School of Journalism. An election year presents special challenges for investigative journalists as politicians spin and attack on every story. The duty of the media is to dig and document rather than speculate, but how serious are broadcast, newspaper, magazine, and online producers about exploring agendas (obvious or hidden) behind the soundbites? The panelists evaluate the record and talk about what investigative reporters need to do between now and the November election. This panel is also co-sponsored by Investigative Reporters and Editors.

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Politics - Not as Usual: It's Still the Economy, Stupid!
Webcast
Tuesday, June 15, 2004

Are the voters receiving the information they need to make crucial decisions? What do we really know about the 2004 presidential candidates? What do they want us to know? When is the spin spun without challenge? When is it exposed? With the Democrats soon to convene in Boston and the Republican National Convention preparing to meet in New York, this series of distinguished speakers explores the media and the message of the political campaigns. Co-sponsored by The New School and The Missouri School of Journalism.

Jim Ellis, chief of correspondents, Business Week, and Alan Sloan, Wall Street editor, Newsweek; Mark Tatge, Midwest Bureau Chief, Forbes; moderator Martha Steffens, Society of American Business Editors and Writers, (SABEW), and Chair in Business and Financial Journalism, Missouri School of Journalism. Other issues may wax and wane, but to the U.S. electorate the economy is almost always at the top of their concerns when they choose a president. 2004 is no different. Panelists consider the role of economic issues in this year's campaign and their likely role in determining who will be in the White House next year.

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Politics - Not as Usual: Elizabeth Drew on American Politics: What's Going Wrong and Why
Webcast
Tuesday, June 22, 2004

Are the voters receiving the information they need to make crucial decisions? What do we really know about the 2004 presidential candidates? What do they want us to know?When is the spin spun without challenge? When is it exposed? With the Democrats soon to convene in Boston and the Republican National Convention preparing to meet in New York, this series of distinguished speakers explores the media and the message of the political campaigns. Co-sponsored by The New School and The Missouri School of Journalism.

Elizabeth Drew on American Politics: What's Going Wrong and Why
A political reporter for more than forty years and nationally syndicated columnist, Elizabeth Drew is one of the few journalists who covered both the Nixon and the Clinton impeachment controversies and is considered one of the nation's most insightful writers about politics behind the scenes. She is the author of twelve books, including American Politics: What Went Wrong and Why and, most recently, Citizen McCain, and is a frequent commentator on "Meet the Press" and "The News Hour with Jim Lehrer." Here, she is interviewed by Geneva Overholser, Hurley Professor of Public Affairs Reporting, Missouri chool of Journalism.

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President of Argentina Nestor Kirchner and Professor Paul Krugman
A Public Conversation on the First Year of the New Argentine Government

Webcast
Wednesday, May 5, 2004

Moderated by Michael A. Cohen, Director of The Argentina Observatory at The New School Graduate Program in International Affairs.

Almost one year ago, Argentine President Néstor Kirchner took office in a country with nearly half the population below the poverty line, 18% unemployment and a deep political crisis. Since then, his administration caught the world’s attention for facing off with the IMF and international creditors and reactivating the economy from the negative double digits to the second-largest growth rate in the world last year, after China. Although most of the social indicators have improved during the last 12 months, the social situation is critical. His administration still faces the long-term challenge of rebuilding the country, its economy and its social fabric, dissolved during the 1990s' structural adjustment programs and the collapse of December, 2001. Within this context, Kirchner has also undertaken important steps towards institutional reform, appointing distinguished and independent personalities to the Supreme Court and seeking the prosecution of human rights violators from the military dictatorship.

Professor Paul Krugman is one of the world's preeminent economists. He has authored or edited 20 books on economic and political issues, including his most recent The Great Unraveling: Losing Our Way in the New Century and The Return of Depression Economics, where he looks at the various economic crises of the 1990s and sees an "eerie resemblance to the Great Depression," instead of the "new world order" promised by the triumph of capitalism over socialism. He holds a Ph.D. from MIT, and has taught at Yale, MIT and Stanford. He now teaches at Princeton. Krugman's academic work -over 200 professional papers- has focused on international trade. As an author, he has written for a broader public audience, including his bi-weekly Op-Ed columns for the New York Times, many of them dedicated to Argentina. In 1995, Professor Krugman was one of the first international economist to predict the eventual failure of the economic policies developed during those years in Argentina.This event is sponsored by the Argentina Observatory of The New School University.

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President Kerrey to Discuss New Book on John Kerry
Wednesday, May 26, 2004

President Bob Kerrey will discuss a new critical biography about John F. Kerry with the authors. David Plotke, chair and associate professor of political science, at the Graduate Faculty and the authors of the book, Michael Kranish, Brian C. Mooney, and Nina J. Easton, will participate in the discussion. John F. Kerry: The Complete Biography (Public Affairs), the first full and in-depth book about the candidate's life, is based on a highly regarded series on Kerry published in the Boston Globe, plus years of additional reporting. Who is the man who will become the Democratic party's nominee for president in 2004, and what kind of leader will he be?

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The Prison Industry: Artistic Approaches to Activism
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Friday, April 7, 2006

One of the primary goals in the punishment of crime has been the hope for reform. Today, however, the role of the prison as a place for rehabilitation, growth, and personal advancement appears obsolete. Since the privatization of the United States prison system in the 1980’s, the system has become a vast $40 billion-a-year industry, the most elaborate in the world. At a time when the U.S. has achieved the highest rate of imprisonment per capita in the history of the world—in which, for instance, one in four African American men are under correctional supervision—the American public is slowly awakening to an unprecedented crisis of mass incarceration.
 
Investigating notions of punishment and imprisonment, repentance and acquittal, this discussion addresses the prison industry, focusing on artistic approaches to activism and reform. The evening’s program will begin with a screening of “"I Won't Drown on that Levee and You Ain't Gonna' Break My Back"” (USA, 2005) by Ashley Hunt which uses the New Orleans prison crisis as a case study and a point of departure for a larger crisis in incarceration and rehabilitation. * This event is a part of the “Forgiveness” Cycle.

 
Participants: Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Director, Program in American Studies & Ethnicity, Associate Professor of ASE and Geography, University of Southern California; Ashley Hunt, artist and activist; Trevor Paglen, artist, writer, and experimental geographer working out of the Department of Geography at the University of California, Berkeley; Temporary Services, artist collaborative, represented by Salem Collo-Julin.

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The Prince of the City: Giuliani's New York and the Genius of American Life
Webcast
Wednesday, June 15, 6:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m.

Fred Siegel, author of The Prince of the City, Professor of History at the Cooper Union and Senior Fellow of the Progressive Policy Institute (Washington, DC); with others to be announced. Siegel's biography is the first analytic account of "America's Mayor," Rudolph Giuliani, who, even before he became the hero of 9/11, had won acclaim for overcoming the the image of New York as a crime-ridden city ever on the verge of economic collapse and restoring its glamor and prosperity. Siegel sketches Giuliani's successes—crime reduced dramatically, local taxes cut, and welfare rolls reduced. Is this a model of how other U.S. cities might become vibrant and dynamic places to live again after forty years of middle-class flight? Siegel also points out where Giuliani notably failed and examines the factors that still menace New York City's future.

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Privatizing America’s Foreign policy
Webcast
Thursday, March 23, 2006

A panel discussion with Douglas Brooks, Founder and President, International Peace Operations Association (IPOA);Marcela Gaviria and Martin Smith, Co-Producers, PBS/FRONTLINE documentary "Private Warriors" chronicling the activities of private military companies in Iraq; and William Hartung, President's fellow at the World Policy Institute and director of the Institute's Arms Trade Project. Moderated by Michael A. Cohen, Co-Project Leader, Privatization of Foreign Policy Project, World Policy Institute.

As the "era of the nation-state" gives way to the "era of the non-state actor, private actors -- from wealthy philanthropists and multi-national corporations to international terrorists and even individuals - are coming to play a defining role in U.S. foreign policy. Nowhere is the traditional dividing line between public and private authority becoming more blurred than in the realm of national security. More than ever, the U.S. military is relying on the services of private military companies (PMCs) to support combat and stabilization missions essential to America's national security. In fact, it is estimated that more than 20,000 private contractors are currently serving in Iraq. The contracting of private security forces is changing the very way that combat operations are planned and executed. Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq have highlighted the substantial benefits PMCs can offer, but they have also shown that PMCs can operate in an ambiguous legal and regulatory environment that leaves open important questions about transparency, accountability and the rule of law. It is not only U.S foreign policy that is being affected - NGOs and international organizations are facing difficult questions and when and how to utilize this new and undefined fighting force. Please note that online participants can view segments of the PBS/Frontline documentary "Private Warriors" referred to during the panel discussion by going to http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/warriors/view/.

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Public Art Fund Talks at The New School with Alex Katz
Webcast
Wednesday, April 4, 2007

With painter Alex Katz, based in New York City. Katz’ recent exhibitions include the Irish Museum of Modern Art (2007); The Jewish Museum and PaceWildenstein, New York, (2006). He has had major retrospectives at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Saatchi Collection. Alex Katz was also one of the first artists to create a project for the Public Art Fund in its founding year, 1977. Now in its twelfth year, Public Art Fund has produced this ongoing lecture series of presentations and discussions by some of today’s most influential artists, critics, and curators. For information, call Public Art Fund at 212.980.3942. Presented by Public Art Fund in association with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School.

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Public Investement in the 21st Century
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2; Part 3; Part 4; Part 5.
Wednesday, April 26, 2006

Political debate today focuses on the federal budget deficit, but the real American deficit may be in public investment--in education, technology, transportation, energy, and child care. The New School conference on "Public Investment in the 21st Century" will bring together experts in these areas to discuss our national needs, strategies to meet these needs, and the political resistance to this agenda. This will be followed by a wide-ranging discussion of the ways to overcome apparent fiscal constraints on public investment. Speakers include Ambassador Felix G. Rohatyn, former U.S. Ambassador to France, Nobel laureate Robert Solow of MIT, Richard Nelson of Columbia University, Peter Orszag from the Brookings Institution. "Public Investment in the 21st Century" is sponsored by: Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis.

Program
12:00 p.m. - Whatever Happened to Public Investment?
Ambassador Felix G. Rohatyn, former U.S. Ambassador to France
Introduction by Bernard Schwartz, Loral Space and Communications

1:30 p.m. - Energy, Healthcare, and Transportation
Joel Rogers, University of Wisconsin Law School
Bruce Vladeck, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey
Robert E. Paaswell, CCNY Transportation Research Center
Moderated by Teresa Ghilarducci, University of Notre Dame and The New School for Social Research.

3:15 p.m. - Education and R&D
Richard Nelson, Columbia University
Janet Gornick, City University of New York
Robert Gordon, Center for American Progress
Moderated by William Milberg, The New School for Social Research

5:00 p.m. - Budget Deficits and Public Investment
Robert Solow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Peter Orszag, Brookings Institution
Robert McIntyre, Citizens for Tax Justice
Moderated by Jeff Madrick, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis

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Public Perception of Torture: News and Entertainment
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Thursday, December 7, 2006

As part of a three-part series on "Humanity and Torture," being sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs at The New School, this panel will discuss the power of the media to shape our ideas about acceptability of torture. A short composite film of excerpts from Hollywood movies, TV dramas, documentaries, and news footage will precede the discussion. This series continues on January 24, 2007.

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The Public Talks Roundtable: The Public Theater Goes to War
Webcast
Thursday, March 9, 2006

Writers, directors, designers and performers who have been part of productions that address war and its discontents talk about the spirit of their times and how theater can effect change. Panelists include Jessica Hagedorn, Brett C. Leonard, and David Rabe with others to be announced. Bill Goldstein adjunct professor at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, moderates. For more information and to see the complete schedule of anniversary events, visit www.publictheater.org or call 212.539.8500. Sponsored by The Public Theater's 50th Anniversary Celebration, the Writing Program and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School. The Public Talks is produced by Jayme Koszyn Consulting.

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Radio Communities: The Other Side of the Electronic Divide
Webcast
Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Radio creates a dimension in which various communities can meet, exchange, discuss, and develop ideas, transforming the way we think of notions of geography and public place. Since cyberspace and advanced technologies in media have not yet reached much of the developing world, radio is still the most accessible medium for sharing knowledge across borders and in spite of time and space. As non-visual medium, it has gained additional prominence in politically charged situations where a certain degree of anonymity is necessary. What political, cultural and humanitarian goals can be served by this medium exclusively? How does radio function as a tool for shared information? This panel discusses the longevity of the medium and the ability of the airwaves to keep the world connected where technology fails. Panelists include Pete Tridish, Founder, Prometheus Radio Project; William H. Siemering, President, Developing Radio Partners; Khin Phyu Htway, student, The New School and contributor to Voice of America, Burmese service; and Gregory Whitehead, writer and artist. Moderator: Stephanie Guyer-Stevens, Producer, Outer Voices. This event is presented as part of the Vera List Center’s program cycle on “The Public Domain.”

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Reclaiming the Land
Audiocast
Wednesday, May 24, 2006

With the goal to acknowledge past mistakes and erase harm done to the earth, civil leaders, lawyers, landscape architects, and artists have embarked on international efforts to reclaim polluted lands. These engagements require a careful understanding of the land’s history and damage, and often demand novel forms of collaborations between artists, architects and scientists from various disciplines. The conversation will address such topics as toxic waste, sanitation, and urban renewal. It will look at contemporary interdisciplinary innovative collaborations that engage in land reclamation processes which don’t necessarily return the land to its original state but instead lead to new ways of using it. * This event is a part of the “Forgiveness” Cycle.
   
Panelists: Alan Berger, Associate Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Design; author of “Reclaiming the American West”; Chris Reed, Stoss Landscape Urbanism, Boston; Mierle Laderman Ukeles, artist-in-residence, Department of Sanitation, New York

Moderator: Niall Kirkwood, Professor and Chair, Department of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

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Revisioning India and China: Authors & Artists - Narendra Jadhav
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Tuesday, October 11, 2005

A formal book launch and dialogue with Narendra Jadhav, author of Untouchables.
Opening remarks to be given by Bob Kerrey, President of The New School, followed by a dialogue between the author and Arjun Appadurai, Provost and Senior Vice-President of The New School.

About the Author:
Dr. Narendra Jadhav was born in Mumbai, India in 1953. A renowned economist, prolific writer and public speaker, he is currently the Principal Adviser and Chief Economist for the Reserve Bank of India. Dr. Jadhav has written several books including Monetary Economics for India and has published over seventy research papers and articles. He has served as advisor to the Executive Director of the IMF. Dr. Jadhav holds a doctorate degree in economics from Indiana University. His major research interests include monetary economics, public finance, international economics and econometrics.

About the Book:
Dr. Narendra Jadhav's powerful book, 'Untouchables' (Scribner), tells an inspiring story of his family's struggle for equality and justice in India, where millions of untouchables have been compelled to lead a peripheral subhuman existence for centuries. This is Dr. Jadhav's family's triumphant story to overcome caste discrimination, illiteracy and poverty through empowerment, education and democracy. 'Untouchables' has been translated into more than ten languages worldwide.

About the India China Institute:
The India China Institute, established in 2004, fosters study, research and connections among India, China and the United States by nurturing the analysis of major issues and by identifying emerging trends in global processes. Revisioning India & China: Authors and Artists is an ongoing series of the India China Institute that invites select authors and artists to discuss their work and insights on contemporary issues, with particular focus on urbanization and globalization in India, China and the United States.

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The Roberts Court: One-Year Out
Webcast
Wednesday, September 27, 2006

Has the replacement of Rehnquist and O'Connor with Roberts and Alito changed the direction of the Supreme Court?  The Wolfson Center for National Affairs at The New School presents a panel moderated by New School President Bob Kerrey and featuring Joan Biskupic, author of Sandra Day O'Connor: How the First Woman on the Supreme Court Became Its Most Influential Justice; Jeffrey Rosen, author of The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in An Anxious Age, and legal affairs editor of The New Republic; Sanford Levinson, author of Wrestling with Diversity, Garwood Centennial Professor, University of Texas School of Law; and Stephen Wermiel, adjunct professor and associate director, Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project American University Washington College of Law. The panelists will address how the Supreme Court occupies a key position in any redirection of American policy, especially such hot-button issues of today as abortion, separation of church and state, gay rights, and executive power post-9/11, and what the specific power and the appropriate role of the court are and ought to be.

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Sex (Limited) Education
Webcast
Wednesday, February 1, 2006

New York City has begun to revamp sex education in the public schools, creating a new health curriculum as well as an HIV/AIDS education program. Are the city schools doing all they can to prepare young New Yorkers for safe sexual lives? What do parents, students and teachers think of the changes? How is our city’s experience in keeping with national trends while bucking others? Panelists include Sharon Lerner, journalist and senior fellow of the Center for New York City Affairs at Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy; and Betty Rothbart, Director of School Health in the Department of Education. Andrew White, director of the Center for New York City Affairs, moderates. Co-presented by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs and the Center for New York City Affairs.

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Sex Work Matters: Beyond Divides
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Thursday, March 30, 2006

Featuring sex workers, activists and academics (and those who fit more than one of these categories) from around the world, the conference is an opportunity for exchange of ideas and networking about issues surrounding sex work. Panels and roundtables explore current issues in sex work research, economics of sex work, challenges and opportunities in outreach and activism, issues of identity and intimacy, sex work and the state, and other topics.
Presented by The New School, together with the CUNY Graduate Center.

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Slavery and Black Participation in the Civil War
Webcast
Friday, February 18, 2005

In honor of Black History Month, the New School University will present a panel discussion on "Slavery and Black Participation in the Civil War". Panelists include: Greggory Spence, Vice President and General Counsel for New School University and a senior lecturer at the Milano Graduate School; Dr. James Horton, director of the Afro-American Communities Project of the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian, and Benjamin Banneker Professor of American Studies and History at George Washington University; and Dr. Frank Smith, commentator, civil rights activist and politician and chairman of the board and chief executive officer for the African American Civil War Memorial in Washington, D.C.

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Some Observations on Female Sexuality: A Public Lecture by Julia Kristeva
Webcast
Friday, April 8, 2005

Drawing on Freud as well as French psychoanalysts who work in the same vein, Julia Kristeva offers a new vision of feminine sexuality based on a two phase oedipal complex. In the first stage, the mother-daughter relationship is dominated by an attachment to the mother (identification and erotisation); in the second phase, an object shift occurs with the father becoming the main pole of attraction. Here, however, there is also identification with the paternal function as the symbolic function which guarantees that the woman-subject is established on the levels of language, taboos and ethics. Nevertheless, the attachments of the first Oedipal stage persist, making for a split feminine subject, a subject whose bisexuality is more accentuated than in the case of men, but also a subject who perceives a fundamental uncanniness or strangeness in the paternal order, both symbolic and social. What follows is either a renewed outbreak of depression or, on the contrary, a turn to irony, revolt and creativity. The maternal situation offers itself as one of several possible solutions to these conflicts. Julia Kristeva will thus open her talk on the problematic of feminine genius which she developed in her triptych devoted to Arendt, Klein and Colette.

Julia Kristeva is Professor of the Institut Universitaire de France, where she holds the chair in Literary Theory. She teaches in the University of Paris 7 Denis Diderot, where she also directs the doctoral school in « Language, literature, image, civilisation and human sciences, for the francophone, anglophone and East Asian domains ». She is a member of the Paris Psychoanalytic Association and of the International Psychoanalytic Association created by S.Freud. She is a Visiting Professor of many universities, including Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Georgetown and New School in the United States, and Toronto, Cambridge, Oxford and Moscow in other countries. She is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the British Academy, and Doctor Honoris Causa of the universities of Harvard (USA), Victoria and Toronto (Canada), the Université Libre in Belgium, Bayreuth in Germany, as well as at Sofia in her native Bulgaria. She is the author of many works, among which : the recent trilogy The Feminine Genius : Hannah Arendt, Melanie Klein and Colette (Columbia University Press) and four novels, the most recent of which, Meurtre à Byzance, a saga of crusades ancient and modern, has been widely acclaimed by the critics. Her entire work has been translated into English, and her major works are available in other languages, notably Spanish, Russian, German, Japanese, Chinese, Portuguese, Italian and Arabic. She holds several public appointments in France : she is a member of the Council for Social and Economic Affairs (in the « external relations » section), she is also President of the National Council for the Disabled. Julia Kristeva has received several distinctions, among which: Chevalier des arts et des lettres, Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur, Chevalier de l'Ordre du mérite.

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The SculptureCenter Lectures at The New School:
A Subjective History of Sculpture with John Armleder

Audiocast
Monday, May 1, 2006

The third in the three-part series exploring how contemporary artists think about sculpture, SculptureCenter, in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School, presents artist-led lectures alongside its exhibition program. In this series, established mid-career artists present specific works, bodies of work, texts, or even personal anecdotes--taken from inside and outside sculpture, and inside and outside "art"--to tell their own story of sculpture's history. These subjective, incomplete, partial, mis-remembered, or otherwise eclectic histories together examine sculpture's evolving strategies, behaviors, dreams, and mistakes over the course of human civilization. For more information, please visit www.sculpture-center.org/pe. Presented by SculptureCenter and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics.

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The SculptureCenter Lectures at The New School:
A Subjective History of Sculpture with Trisha Donnelly

Audiocast
Monday, April 24, 2006

Sculpture is a medium-in-motion, eluding concise definition. As artists continuously re-invent its rules, materials, and conventions, we are challenged to incorporate new understandings of what, in fact, constitutes a sculpture. Linked to urbanism, architecture, and acoustic and visual perception, it is a charged territory that mirrors political, social and technological developments.

As part of exploring how contemporary artists think about sculpture, SculptureCenter, in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School, presents artist-led lectures alongside its exhibition program. In this series, established mid-career artists present specific works, bodies of work, texts, or even personal anecdotes—taken from inside and outside sculpture, and inside and outside “art”—to tell their own story of sculpture’s history. These subjective, incomplete, partial, mis-remembered, or otherwise eclectic histories together examine sculpture’s evolving strategies, behaviors, dreams, and mistakes over the course of human civilization.

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Sexual Harassment: Twenty Years After Meritor V. Vinson
What do these employers have in common: Dial Corporation, FedEx, Ford Motor Company, New York's Lutheran Medical Center, Salomon Smith Barney, Tyson Foods, the United States Postal Service, and the Washington, D.C., Department of Corrections? Answer: Each recently agreed to pay damages of $1 million or more for years of sexual harassment. More than 40 years after the passage of the Civil Rights Act and almost 20 years after the U.S. Supreme Court declared it illegal, sexual harassment is still common in every job sector in every part of the country. Sexual harassment isn't just friendly fanny patting or vulgar jokes. At its worst, it can be terrorism on the job: an onslaught of sexualized threats and humiliations, grabbing, groping, assault, and stalking. It happens to waitresses, police officers, dental hygienists, production line workers, attorneys general, and CFOs. Sexual harassment is often effective in driving women out of "men's" jobs, derailing them as career competitors, and otherwise keeping female wages down. Why does this continue? And why aren't we outraged that it does? Panelists include Jennifer A. Drobac, Associate Professor, Indiana School of Law; Susan Antilla, columnist for Bloomberg News and author of Tales from the Boom-Boom Room: The Landmark Legal Battles That Exposed Wall Street's Shocking Culture of Sexual Harassment; Elizabeth Grossman, Regional Attorney, NYC Equal Employment Opportunity Commission; others to be announced. Moderated by E.J. Graff, senior researcher, Brandeis Institute for Investigative Journalism, and author of What Is Marriage For? Sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs.

Onsite Information
Monday, June 12, 7:00 p.m.
Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, 55 West 13th St., 2nd floor
Admission: $8

Webcast
Monday, June 12, 7:00 p.m.
You will need the free Real Player to view the webcast.
View an archived version of the webcast: Part 1 Part 2.

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Social Protection Initiatives for Children, Women and Families: An Analysis of Recent Experiences
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2.
Monday, October 30, 2006; Tuesday, October 31, 2006

The well being of children, the impact of ensuring the fulfillment of children's rights and lessons learned for future action will be a central focus of the third international conference on "Children's Rights and Policies" organized by UNICEF and the Graduate Program in International Affairs at The New School. The conference will address the scope of social protection for children, addressing programs and solutions that are not traditionally considered as part of the social protection mechanisms.

MONDAY, October 30, 2006

Use links below to view archived sessions. Remaining sessions will be posted shortly.
View "Opening and Welcome." DAY 1 Opening/ Welcome
Benjamin Lee (TBD), Provost, The New School
Michael A. Cohen, Director, Graduate Program in International Affairs, The New School
Ann M. Venneman (TBD), Executive Director, UNICEF
Saad Houry (TBD), Director, DPP, UNICEF
Elizabeth Gibbons, Chief, Global Policy Section, UNICEF Division of Policy and Planning
View archives of the keynote:
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4.
Keynote Address: "Challenges in Social Protection Initiatives"
Chair: Michael A. Cohen, The New School
Steen Lau Jorgensen, Director, Sustainable Development Network, The World Bank
Freedom from Want and Freedom from Fear: New Frontiers in Social Policy
Ruth Lister, Professor of Social Policy, Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University
View Session 1 archives:
Part 1 and Part 2.
Session 1 Session 1: "Social Protection and Child Rights"
Chair: Eva Jespersen (UNICEF), Commentator: Tamo Chattopadhay (NYU)
Susana Sottoli, Juan Fernando Nuñez and UNICEF LAC Rights-based Poverty Reduction Working Group (Unicef)
Rights-Based Comparative Study of Social Protection Programmes in Latin America
Sheila Kamerman (Columbia University) and Shirley Gatenio-Gabel (Fordham University)
Social Protection for Children and Their Families: A Global Overview
Eliana Mercedes Villar Marquez, Bekele Tefera and Nicola Jones (Save The Children)
Promoting Synergies Between Women's Empowerment and Children's Rights: Assessing New Social
Protection Initiatives in Ethiopia and Peru
View Session 2 archive. Session 2 Session 2: "Social Protection and Poverty Reduction"
Chair: Nora Lustig (UNDP), Commentator: Ruth Lister (Loughborough University)
Sidya Ould A. El Hadj and Medou Diakhate (Unicef)
Social Protection Schemes in West and Central Africa: A Proposal for Renewal
Franziska Gassman and Geranda Notten (Maastricht Graduate School of Governance)
Size Matters: Poverty Reduction Effects of Means-Tested and Universal Child Benefits in Russia
Ann F. Witteveen (Oxfam)
No Small Change - Unconditional Cash Transfers as a Response to Acute Food Insecurity in Zambia and Malawi
3:15 pm - 3:45 pm Keynote Address: "Insert Title"
Judith Tendler, Professor of Political Economy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
View Session 3 archives:
Part 1 and Part 2.
Session 3 DAY 1 Session 3: "Social Protection and Child Vulnerability"
Chair: Nurper Ulkuer (ECD), Commentator: Jacqueline Klopp (Columbia University)
Roger Pearson (Unicef)
Cash Transfers Programme for Orphans and Vulnerable Children
Kunniseri E. Vaidyanathan (Indian Association of Social Sciences and Health)
Initiatives for Social Protection of Children, Women and Families: The Experience of India
Candace M. Miller (Boston University)
Meeting the Needs of Orphaned and Vulnerable Children Through Social Welfare Assistance
View archive of the closing panel:
"Relevant Questions on Social Protection Policy."
Closing Panel: "Relevant Questions on Social Protection Policy"
Moderator: Gaspar Fajth (Unicef)
Judith Tendler - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Yoriko Yasukava (TBD) - UNICEF, Bernd Schubert - UNICEF, Sheila Kamerman (TBD) - Columbia University

TUESDAY, October 31, 2006

Use links below to view archived sessions. Remaining sessions will be posted shortly.

View Session 4 archive.

Session 4 DAY 2 Session 4: "Cash Transfers, Education and Health - Part I"
Chair: Sheila Kamerman (Columbia University), Commentator: Angela Escallon Emiliani (Red Distrital de Cooperacion para el Desarrollo
Mahesh Patel and Radhika Gore (Unicef)
Direct Cash Transfers to Households: Experience from The Tsunami
Esther Schuering (MCDSS/GTZ Social Safety Net Project) and Michelo Stanfield (Department of Social Welfare, Zambia)
Social Cash Transfers in Zambia - An innovative Approach of Reaching Out to Children of HIV/AIDS Affected Households
Katie Schenk (Population Council)
Orphans and Vulnerable Children in Zambia: Exploring Eligibility for Assistance Programs
Irina V. Nicorich (Moldova State Institute of International Relations) and Chris Grant (Mercer University)
The Little Engine that Does: How One NGO Refocused Attention to the Needs of Children in Moldova
View Session 5 archive. Session 5 Session 5: "Cash Transfers, Education and Health - Part II"
Chair: Sakiko Fukuda-Parr (The New School), Commentator: Rosalia Cortes (FLACSO Argentina)
Mahesh Patel, Cliff Meyers and Suzanna Bond Hinsz (Unicef)
Effects of Decentralization on Primary Education Phase I: A Survey of East Asia and the Pacific Islands
Janet Gardener (GHK Intl) and Ramya N. Subrahmania (IDS)
Social Exclusion in Health and Education: Case Studies from Asia
Nikita Tolani, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Sharon Lynn Kagan (Columbia University)
The Impact of Culture on Parenting Education Programs During Early Childhood: A Cross-National Exploration
View archive of Keynote by Rebeca Grynspan. Keynote Address: "Insert Title"
Rebeca Grynspan, Assistant Secretary-General, Assistant Administrator of UNDP and Director of UNDP's Regional Bureau of Latin America and the Caribbean
View Session 6 archive. Session 6 Session 6: "Social Protection, Exclusion and Child Well-Being"
Chair: Alberto Minujin (The New School), Commentator: Isabel Ortiz (UN)
Robert Jenkins (Unicef) and Eimar Barr (Unicef)
Addressing Social Exclusion in Primary Education in India
Michael E. Foster and Kelly Evans (University of North Carolina)
Trends in the Well-being of Children and Youth in Eastern Europe
Annie Leatt (Children's Institute)
Under What Conditions? Social Protection for Children in South Africa
View archive of the closing panel:
"The Road Ahead."
Panel Closing Panel: "The Road Ahead"
Moderator: Elizabeth Gibbons (Unicef)
Rebeca Grynspan - UNDP, Emmanuel Jimenez - The World Bank (TBD),
Michael Cohen - The New School, 2 more participants TBD

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The Story Prize Award Ceremony
Webcast
Wednesday, January 25, 2006

Larry Dark, director of the Story Prize, moderator. The three finalists for this annual book award for short fiction read from their short story collections and discuss their work. The event culminates with the announcement of the winner and presentation of the $20,000 cash prize. The finalists are Jim Harrison, author of The Summer He Didn't Die; Maureen F. McHugh, author of Mothers and Other Monsters; and Patrick O'Keefe, author of The Hill Road. For more information visit www.thestoryprize.org. Co-sponsored by the Story Prize and the Writing Program at The New School.

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Their America: The U.S in the Eyes of the Rest of the World
Keynote Address, Senator George Mitchell

Webcast
Tuesday October 19, 2004

Their America: The U.S. in the Eyes of the Rest of the World is the first conference to bring together representatives from around the world to discuss the growing tide of anti-American sentiment. Moving away from the divisive trend of “America bashing”, Their America will foster understanding and propose solutions to anti-American attitudes by placing this crucial issue in a historical context spanning 75 years.

Senator George Mitchell will deliver the keynote address. During his fourteen year senatorial career Mitchell earned a Nobel Peace Prize nomination for chairing the peace negotiations in Northern Ireland. New School University President Bob Kerrey will deliver additional remarks.

Their America is a public conference where journalists, writers, academics, politicians, and activists from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America will share their unique perspectives on how the U.S. is viewed in their countries and regions. Attendees will have a unique opportunity to engage in candid dialogue with the panelists. Their America will explore the topic of anti-American sentiment in three sessions. Session I is Views from France, Germany, the UK and Mexico. Session II is Views from Africa, The Balkans, Palestine and Israel. Session III is Views from Indonesia, Pakistan, Russia and China. Confirmed speakers include Michael Naumann (Germany’s Former Minister of Culture and Media and Editor in Chief of Die Zeit), Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem (Secretary General of the Pan African Movement) and Pervez Hoodbhoy (Professor of Nuclear Physics, Quaid-I-Azam University in Islamabad Pakistan)This conference is presented by the New School University’s Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science.

For additional information contact 212-229-2488 or visit www.socres.org/fear.

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Unforgiving Art? Unforgivable Nation?
Audiocast
Thursday, January 26, 2006

Philosopher Theodor Adorno, responding in his time to the horrors of fascism and world war, described art as holding the promise of happiness, but only if it ruthlessly exposes politics as a language devoid of utopian potential. Activist artist Paul Chan and philosopher Robert Hullot-Kentor address the problem of what art can be in our time. The idea of forgiveness is central to such a discussion. Given the horrors of new wars and environmental destruction, can art help reconcile differences and mitigate conflicts? Or is art, in its formal beauty, a cruel reminder of how difficult true reconciliation is? Is the aesthetics of Adorno the key to unlocking this dialectic of an unforgiving art and an unforgivable nation? Paul Chan’s installation and video work has been exhibited at MoMA, the Hammer Museum (LA), the Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston), the Carnegie International, the Lyon Biennale, and the Guangzhou Triennial. He has worked with the Teamsters, Indymedia, and the Nobel Peace Prize-nominated Voices in the Wilderness group in their campaign against the war in Iraq. Hullot-Kentor teaches philosophy at Long Island University. He has translated some of T.W. Adorno’s major works, including Aesthetic Theory. A collection of his own essays, Origin is the Goal: Collected Essays on T.W. Adorno, is being published in 2006. Presented by the Vera List Center for Art and Politics. This event is part of the Vera List Center’s year-long series of programs devoted to “Considering Forgiveness.”

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Urban Conversations: Cities at Risk
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2; Part 3
Friday, April 7, 2006

Urban leaders nationwide are focused on disaster planning, even as New Orleans and New York City continue to grapple with the challenges of recovery and renewal. What have we learned about preparing for, responding to and rebuilding after natural and man-made catastrophes? Is it even possible to plan adequately for such crises? Milano’s next conference in the Urban Conversations series brings together public officials, academics, journalists and other experts from across the US for a forward-thinking discussion of readiness, response and renewal.

Featured participants include: Governor Kathleen Blanco, Louisiana; Michael Brown, Former Director, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); Peter K. Eisinger, Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy; Clark Kent Ervin, Director, Homeland Security Initiative, The Aspen Institute; Fred Hochberg, Dean, Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy; Bob Kerrey, President, The New School; Brian Lehrer, The Brian Lehrer Show,WNYC, New York Public Radio; Soledad O'Brien, anchor, American Morning, CNN; Mayor Martin O'Malley, Baltimore; John Norquist, President, Congress for the New Urbanism; former mayor, Milwaukee; Judith Rodin, President, The Rockefeller Foundation; Lawrence Vale, Head, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; James Lee Witt, Chairman and CEO, James Lee Witt Associates, LLC; former Director Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Schedule
8:30 Welcome Remarks
Fred Hochberg, Dean, Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy, and Mayor Martin O'Malley.

9:00 Panel 1
Planning for Catastrophe: The Benefit of Hindsight
Moderator- Brian Lehrer; Michael Brown, Clark Kent Ervin, Bob Kerrey, President, The New School, Mayor Martin O'Malley, James Lee Witt.

Keynote Address
Governor Kathleen Blanco

10:30 Panel 2
Renewal: Getting it Right This Time Around
Moderator:Soledad O'Brien; Governor Kathleen Blanco, Peter K. Eisinger, Judith Rodin,  John Norquist, Lawrence Vale.

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Urban Conversations: Where Red Meets Blue
Webcasts
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

Roundtable One
Opening Remarks; Dean Hochberg, Milano and William Bevington, Executive Director PIIM
Panel

Roundtable Two
Opening Remarks; Alex F. Schwartz, Chair
Panel part 1
Panel part 2

Roundtable Three
Opening Remarks and Panel

Metro-area growth is transforming states nationwide, and urban issues have new meaning in both Republican- and Democratic-majority states. With Republicans in town for their convention, the Milano Graduate School brings you a day of conversation on urban politics and policy, engaging political leaders and opinion makers from both ‘red’ and ‘blue’ states.

Roundtable I: “Where Red Meets Blue: Urban Issues and the Electorate”
Fred Hochberg, dean of Milano, will lead the panel. William Bevington, executive director of Parsons Institute for Information Mapping (PIIM), will make the opening presentation. Speakers include Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN) (invited), Stephen Goldsmith, chair of the Corporation for National and Community Services, and Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH). George Stephanopoulos, anchor of ABC News “This Week,” and Ellen Ratner, bureau chief of Talk News Radio, will moderate.

Roundtable II: “Urban Housing: Living and Working in Affordable Communities”
Alex Schwartz, chair of the Urban Policy Program at Milano, will lead the panel. Speakers include Rep. James Walsh (Syracuse, NY). Andrew Cuomo, former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will also be a panelist. Colbert King, columnist for The Washington Post, will moderate.

Roundtable III: “Urban Immigration: From Foreign Competition to Natural Resource”
Andrew White, director of Milano’s Center for NYC Affairs, will lead the panel. Speakers include Alberto Cardenas, former Chair of the Florida Republican Party and Governor Bill Owens. Rossana Rosado, publisher of El Diario/La Prensa and Marty Tolchin, former editor of The Hill, will moderate.

For more information, visit www.newschool.edu/milano/urbanconversations. For more information on the Convention, go to www.rnc.org.

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U.S. Mayors and Innovative Leadership: Mayor Bloomberg, Bob Kerrey, SF Mayor Gavin Newsom, and George Stephanopoulos
Wednesday, March 30, 8:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

A discussion with current and former mayors of major U.S. cities, who will discuss the tough issues facing urban areas today and their respective approaches to tackling them. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg will open the conference with welcoming remarks. The day’s program will then be divided into three separate conversations with featuring participants, including: Kansas City Mayor Kay Barnes, New School University President Bob Kerrey, Andrew Kirtzman of WCBS-TV, Pittsburgh Mayor Tom Murphy; San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, Pennsylvania Governor and former Philadelphia Mayor Ed Rendell, Dorothy Samuels of The New York Times, Bryna Sanger of the Milano Graduate School, George Stephanopoulos of ABC News, Michael Tomasky of The American Prospect, Darren Walker of the Rockefeller Foundation, and Richmond Mayor and former Virginia Governor L. Douglas Wilder.

8:30 a.m. Welcoming remarks by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

9:30 a.m. Conversation I: Innovative Mayors

Speakers: Kansas City Mayor Kay Barnes; Pittsburgh Mayor Tom Murphy; San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom; Richmond Mayor and former Virginia Governor L. Douglas Wilder. Moderator: George Stephanopoulos, ABC News. Mayors from major U.S. cities – men and women who have broken with longstanding tradition in pursuing innovative initiatives in important areas of public policy – will discuss the characteristics of successful leadership needed to implement creative urban policies.

10:30 a.m. Conversation II: Overcoming Obstacles to Innovation.

Speakers: Dorothy Samuels, The New York Times; Bryna Sanger, Milano Graduate School; Michael Tomasky, The American Prospect; Darren Walker, The Rockefeller Foundation. Moderator: Andrew Kirtzman, WCBS-TV. Journalists, academic observers and opinion leaders will contemplate the future of urban innovation and the political impediments and fiscal austerity that inevitably confront mayors as they pursue their agendas.

12:00 p.m. Conversation III: City Hall and the State

Speakers: Pennsylvania Governor and former Philadelphia Mayor Ed Rendell; Idaho Governor, former U.S. Senator and former Boise Mayor Dirk Kempthorne (invited). Moderator: New School University President and former Nebraska Governor and U.S. Senator, Bob Kerrey. Politicians who have served both in City Hall and the governor’s mansion will explore the dynamics between city and state government in urban innovation.

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War Crimes in West Africa, Will there be Justice?
Webcast
Thursday, April 8, 6:00 p.m.

A panel discussion with Tiawan Gongloe, Research Fellow, Harvard University
and Marieke Wierda, Senior Associate, International Center for Transitional Justice Moderated by Bill Berkeley, Adjunct Professor, Columbia University, Author, The Graves Are Not Yet Full – Race, Tribe and Power in the Heart of Africa.

The civil wars in Liberia and neighboring Sierra Leone killed tens of thousands of civilians, scattered millions from their homes and laid waste to both countries and much of the surrounding region. The fighting has subsided, and the combatants, many of them children, are being disarmed. But a central question remains: will anyone be held accountable for the war crimes that caused so much suffering? A special war crimes tribunal has been established in Sierra Leone under United Nations auspices. The tribunal has indicted Charles Taylor, the former Liberian president and warlord who was centrally responsible for both wars, on charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Mr. Taylor abandoned Liberia last summer and now has asylum in Nigeria. Will he be brought to justice? And why does it matter? A leading Liberian human rights lawyer and a noted expert on war crimes tribunals will discuss this landmark case with the author of a critically-acclaimed book on genocide in Africa.

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What is our Nation’s Role in the World in an Age of Terrorism? Statecraft and Political Vision: The US and Argentine Experiences
Webcast: Part 1; Part 2
Monday, November 8, 2004

Tex Harris, senior American diplomat (retired), secretary of the American Foreign Service Association (AFSA), served as Political Officer at the US Embassy in Buenos Airesfrom 1977-79, during the heart of the military dictatorship. Harris played a crucial role in reporting the human rights violations in Argentina, fighting hard within the State Department to change US foreign policy, and working to alert the world to the horror of forced disappearances in Argentina.Harris’ work saved hundreds of lives, and his diplomatic role is considered an example for all those who work in international relations around the world. For his important work, Harris received the Distinguished Honor Award, the highest award given by the State Department. Currently, Harris spends half of the year travel around the world lecturing in international affairs.

Michael Posner has been the Executive Director of Human Rights First since its founding in 1978. Under his leadership, Human Rights First has earned a distinguished reputation in the areas of political asylum law, international justice, refugee protection and workers rights. Michael has traveled on Human Rights First's behalf to more than 50 countries and hasworked on human rights issues in every region of the world. He has testified before Congress dozens of times on a wide range of issues, from refugee and workers rights to policing in Northern Ireland to the rights of torture victims worldwide.

Hector Timerman has served as the Argentine Consul General in New York since July of this year, although he has a long-standing relationship with this city. In 1979 the repression of the military dictatorship pushed Timerman, then a journalist in Argentina, into exile in the United States, where he received a Master in International Affairs from Columbia University. During this time he co-founded Americas Watch. Timerman was a member of the Advisory Board for nearly a decade, and worked as well with the Fund for Free Expression. In 1997 he returned to journalism to found and direct two magazines: 3puntos and Debates.

The following link provides more information about Tex Harris and his work as a political officer in Argentina: http://www.ser2000.org/protect/actualidad-nac/2078cl01.htm

For more information about the Argentina Observatory, please see the website at: www.argentinaobservatory.org

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What’s Happened to Women’s Rights Around the Planet?
Webcast
Thursday, March 16, 2006

The World Policy Institute at The New School presents a panel discussion with Dr. Blanch Weisen Cook, prize-winning biographer of Eleanor Roosevelt, Distinguished Professor, John Jay College, CUNY Graduate Center Nadine Hack, President, BeCause Global Consultants, advisor on international cause related strategies and Jennifer Whitaker, Senior Fellow, Ralph Bunche Institute, CUNY. Moderated by Claudia Dreifus, Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute, New York Times/Science Times.

Michelle Batchelet is elected President of Chile! Ellen Sirleaf-Johnson of Liberia becomes Africa's first female head of state!! And the Chancellor of Germany, the "fatherland," now has a female Chancellor, Angela Merkel!!! The world of politics, power and participation is finally changing for women. No longer is the idea of female political leadership confined to Scandinavia or Asia--or even to widows with custodial power as was true in Nicaragua, Panama and Guyana. Does the Bush Administration's advocacy of women's rights in the Middle-East advance female participation in the region? Where will this sea change in participation go next (Peru? the US??) and how will international politics be transformed?

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When Affirmative Action Was White
Webcast
Wednesday, January 25, 2006

Ira Katznelson, author of When Affirmative Action Was White. We tend to see the Great Society programs of the 1960s as an outgrowth of the New Deal. In his new book, Katznelson argues that because the New Deal set up a social safety net for whites but not for African-Americans, racial injustice became even more severe. Katznelson attributes this to the “Faustian bargain” the Democratic Party made with South. He extends his analysis up to the current predicament of affirmative action policies: still standing but battered in the face of many vigorously argued critiques. Joining Katznelson to analyze and debate his conclusions are several prominent academics and policy experts. Panelists include John B. Judis, Senior Editor, The New Republic and author of The Paradox of American Democracy: Elites, Special Interests, and the Betrayal of the Public Trust ; and Katherine S. Newman, Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs, Princeton University. Moderated by Nicholas Birns, The New School. Sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs.

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Will China Democratize?
Webcast
Thursday, April 13, 2006

A panel discussion with Dr. Andrew J. Nathan, Class of 1919 Professor and Chair of Political Science at Columbia University; Dr. Yan Sun, Professor of Political Science at the Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York; Dr. Chen Chen, Assistant Professor of Political Science, State University of New York at Albany; and Sijin Chen, China Analyst at the Eurasia Group and PhD candidate, Boston University. Moderated by Dr. James H. Nolt, Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute and Adjunct Professor of Political Science, The New School.

With a global trend toward democracy plus its remarkable success at economic development the question often arises whether China will make commensurate progress in democratization. There have been a few hopeful signs at the local level, including some competitive elections, but even there democratization is limited. Unrest has been growing among peasants and others left behind by economic progress and frustrated by corruption and lack of political responsiveness. At the national level there are some indications that toleration for dissent, essential for democracy, is actually decreasing. What are the obstacles to democratization in China? Are there now more pressures for democratization because of the vast expansion of education and the middle class? Is it possible China could experience top-down democratization initiated by the Communist authorities as happened throughout much of the former Soviet Bloc? This panel is presented by the World Policy Institute and The New School.

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Women and Grassroots Conservatism
Webcast
Wednesday, March 1, 2006

Donald Critchlow, author of Phyllis Schlafly and Grassroots Conservatism and editor of the Journal of Policy History; with Tom Edsell, political writer for the Washington Post; others to be announced. While women voters in the United States are more likely to call themselves liberals than are males, women have been and are active and important in American conservatism. What issues motivate women conservatives? In his recent book, Critchlow examines the rise of the conservative movement in politics through the career of activist and political commentator Phyllis Schlafly. Whatever one’s opinion about Schlafly’s causes, she has played an important role in creating our contemporary political landscape, starting with the election of Ronald Reagan and continuing through the second term of George W. Bush. Sponsored by the Wolfson Center for National Affairs.

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Women of the Underground
Webcast
Tuesday, November 8, 6:00 p.m.

The Transregional Center for Democratic Studies will present a panel discussion on Solidarity's Secret: The Women Who Defeated Communism in Poland" (University of Michigan Press, 2005), a book by Shana Penn that exposes the invisible leadership role played by women in Poland's pro-democracy movement and highlights the unsung heroines of Poland's free press.

Panelists will include: Shana Penn, author of "Solidarity's Secret" and a visiting scholar at the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley; Helena Luczywo, deputy editor-in-chief, "Gazeta Wyborcza," Warsaw; a key organizer of the Solidarity underground and its main clandestine newspaper, "Tygodnik Mazowsze"; Aryeh Neier, President, Open Society Institute; Lawrence Weschler, writer and Director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU; Ann Snitow, feminist scholar, Eugene Lang College, The New School for Liberal Arts.

The panel's moderator will be Elzbieta Matynia, Director, Transregional Center for Democratic Studies at The New School for Social Research.

This event is being held in collaboration with the Polish Cultural Institute (www.polishculture-nyc.org) and is free and open to the public.

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The World of Words: Writing About Wall Street: Exposing the Market's Myths and Mirrors
Webcast
Tuesday, June 7, 2005

Most of us fall into one of two categories: those who dream of writing a book and those who wonder why we can't sell the book we wrote. Authors, editors, agents, publicists, and reviewers talk about all stages of the publishing process, and, since rejection is an inescapable part of the writer's life, also explore dealing with roadblocks and naysayers without losing one's confidence, artistic vision, or perseverance. This program is co-sponsored by The New School for General Studies for General Studies and the Missouri School of Journalism New York Program.

Marty Steffens, moderator, Society of American Business Editors and Writers, Chair of Business and Financial Journalism, Missouri School of Journalism; former executive editor, The San Francisco Chronicle. Panelists: Charles Gasparino of Newsweek, author of Blood on the Street; Andy Kessler, author of the best-seller, Running Money: Hedge Fund Honchos, Monster Markets, and My Hunt for the Big Score, contributor to Wall Street Journal op-ed page and the L.A. Times, Wired, Forbes, etc.; Andy Zelleke, American Academy of Arts & Sciences Corporate Responsibility Project, lecturer at University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, and co-editor, Restoring Trust in American Business.

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The World of Words: Deciding What You Read: How Editors, Agents, Publicists, and Reviewers Choose the Books that Reach the Shelves
Webcast
Tuesday, June 14, 2005

Most of us fall into one of two categories: those who dream of writing a book and those who wonder why we can't sell the book we wrote. Authors, editors, agents, publicists, and reviewers talk about all stages of the publishing process, and, since rejection is an inescapable part of the writer's life, also explore dealing with roadblocks and naysayers without losing one's confidence, artistic vision, or perseverance. This program is co-sponsored by The New School for General Studies for General Studies and the Missouri School of Journalism New York Program.

Steve Weinberg, moderator, author of six nonfiction books, reviewer for many newspapers and magazines; professor, Missouri School of Journalism. Panelists: Jamie Beckman, publicist for Morrow and Avon imprints at HarperCollins and former magazine editor; David Hendin, literary agent, author of a dozen nonfiction books; Jennifer Josephy, Broadway Books/Random House editor, has edited fiction, narrative nonfiction, biographies, memoirs, cookbooks, and other genres by authors both famous and obscure.

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The World of Words: From Rejection to Publication: Navigating the No's on the Road to Success
Webcast
Tuesday, June 21, 2005

Most of us fall into one of two categories: those who dream of writing a book and those who wonder why we can't sell the book we wrote. Authors, editors, agents, publicists, and reviewers talk about all stages of the publishing process, and, since rejection is an inescapable part of the writer's life, also explore dealing with roadblocks and naysayers without losing one's confidence, artistic vision, or perseverance. This program is co-sponsored by The New School for General Studies for General Studies and the Missouri School of Journalism New York Program.

Catherine Wald, moderator, free-lancer, and author of The Resilient Writer: Tales of Rejection and Triumph from 23 Top Authors (Persea Books, 2005). Panelists: William Zinsser, teaches writing at The New School for General Studies, lecturer, author of seventeen books, including the classic, On Writing Well and the recent Writing About Your Life; David Ebershoff, publishing director of Random House Modern Library, author of two novels; Mary Kay Blakely, associate professor, Missouri School of Journalism, author of three memoirs.

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Zero Culture. The Polarization between Memorial and Culture at Ground Zero
Webcast
Monday, December 12, 2005

Why have culture and memorial diverged? Why must we choose one or the other? The acceptance of a master plan for the World Trade Center site in 2003 has not made it immune to intervention, discussion and debate. The ongoing challenges to rebuilding the site, focused on issues of design and security, have most recently polarized the areas of culture and memorialization. Culture, ordinarily the bedrock of remembrance, is estranged from the current planning, and even thought by some to desecrate the site.

The recent expulsions and withdrawals of cultural institutions slated to occupy the site urgently foregrounds the questions that engage this panel, and the citizens of New York: What is at stake in this latest edition of the “culture wars”? What are the implications for daily life, livelihoods, and the vitality of New York City? Is “culture” integral or an appendage to the revitalization and redevelopment of Downtown Manhattan?

Panelists: Tom A. Bernstein, President and Co-founder, Chelsea Piers; Thelma Golden, Director and Chief Curator, The Studio Museum in Harlem; Hans Haacke, artist; Mike Wallace, historian and director, The Gotham Center for New York City History; Bob Yaro, President, Regional Planning Association. Moderator: Paul Goldberger, Dean, Parsons The New School of Design.

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