bell hooks Scholar-in-Residence

Public Events, October 3–10, 2014

For more than three decades, bell hooks (née Gloria Watkins) has been recognized internationally as a scholar, poet, author, and radical thinker. The dozens of books and articles she has published span several genres, including cultural and political analyses and critiques, personal memoirs, poetry collections, and children's books. Her writings cover topics of gender, race, class, spirituality, teaching, and the significance of media in contemporary culture. According to Dr. hooks, these topics must be understood as interconnected in the production of systems of oppression and class domination.

Dr. hooks has appeared in documentary films. She has been celebrated as one of our nation's leading public intellectuals by The Atlantic Monthly and listed as one of Utne Reader's "100 Visionaries Who Could Change Your Life." She is a charismatic speaker who divides her time between teaching, writing, and lecturing around the world.

When Dr. hooks published her first book, And There We Wept, in 1978, she released it under the name "bell hooks" for two reasons. The first was to honor her maternal grandmother, Bell Blair Hooks, whom she has described as being "known for her snappy and bold tongue." Secondly, and more broadly, the name, expressed in lowercase letters, de-emphasizes the author as person and instead focuses attention on the subject of her writing.

A topic prominent in Dr. hooks' most recent writings is community and communion, the ability of loving communities to overcome race, class, and gender inequalities. Another prominent theme in her work has been education, which she views as a practice of freedom. Dr. hooks has called for an approach to learning that nurtures "radical critical consciousness." "The academy is not paradise," she wrote in 1994's Teaching to Transgress. "But learning is a place where paradise can be created. The classroom with all its limitations remains a location of possibility."

This bell hooks residency at The New School coincides with the 20th anniversary of Teaching to Transgress and is a special opportunity for students to engage with education as a practice of freedom. They can participate in a series of intimate conversations and public dialogues on subjects ranging from politics to love, race to spirituality, gender to lived bodies.

RSVP for all events: bellhooks-newschool-october.eventbrite.com

Join the conversation at #bellhooksTNS

Open Celebration: I Confess, I Transgress
Friday, October 3, 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Wollman Hall, 65 West 11th Street
Open to the public; free admission; RSVP requested
Join bell hooks; William Germano, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Cooper Union, and formerly vice-president and publishing director, Routledge; and Stephanie Browner for a reception and a discussion and celebration of the 20th anniversary of Teaching to Transgress.

Teaching to Transgress Today: Theory and Practice In and Outside of the Classroom
Monday, October 6, 12:00-2:00 p.m.
Orozco Room, 66 West 12th Street, 7th floor
RSVP REQUIRED
A lecture by Imani Perry followed by a dialogue with bell hooks, Karlyn Crowley, Zillah Eisenstein, and Shannon Winnubst.

Forever Young: A Public Dialogue Between bell hooks and Gloria Steinem
Monday, October 6, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
The Auditorium at 66 West 12th Street
Open to the public; free admission; RSVP requested
Join bell hooks and Gloria Steinem in a discussion about how feminism encourages transgression—or not.

Transgression: Whose Booty Is This?
Tuesday, October 7, 3:00-4:00 p.m.
Orozco Room, 66 West 12th Street, 7th floor
Open to New School students only; RSVP REQUIRED
An open conversation for students with bell hooks, Anna Czarnik-Neimeyer, Lynee Denise, and Stephanie Troutman.

A Public Dialogue Between bell hooks and Laverne Cox
Tuesday, October 7, 7:00-8:00 p.m.
The Auditorium at 66 West 12th Street
Open to the public; free admission; RSVP requested

A Public Dialogue Between bell hooks and Cornel West
Wednesday, October 8, 4:30-6:00 p.m.
Wollman Hall, 65 West 11th Street
Open to the public; free admission; RSVP requested

Man Enough: Theory and Practice In and Outside of the Classroom
Wednesday, October 8, 7:00-8:00 p.m.
Wollman Hall, 65 West 11th Street
Open to the public; RSVP REQUIRED
An open dialogue on masculinity with bell hooks, Oman Frame, Darnell Moore, Ron Scapp, and Kurt Voss.

Transgressive Sexual Practice
Thursday, October 9, 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Orozco Room, 66 West 12th Street, 7th floor
Open to the public; RSVP REQUIRED
An open dialogue on sexuality with bell hooks, Marci Blackman, and Samuel Delany.

Transgression at The New School
Friday, October 10, 12:30-2:00 p.m.
Orozco Room, 66 West 12th Street, 7th floor
Open to New School faculty only; RSVP REQUIRED
An open conversation with faculty.

Spring 2014 Residency: Public Events, May 5–7, 2014

Passionate Present: Protecting Black Girlhood
A public dialogue between bell hooks + Salamishah Tillet
Monday, May 5, 4:00 p.m.
Wollman Hall, 65 West 11th Street

RSVP required: bellhookspassionatepresent.eventbrite.com

Join bell hooks and Salamishah Tillet, associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania and co-founder of A Long Walk Home, Inc., in a conversation addressing the welfare of black girls and their continued devaluation.

This public dialogue will be livestreamed - new.livestream.com/TheNewSchool

Feminism Talks Back
A New School dialogue between bell hooks + Miriam Ticktin
Tuesday, May 6, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
The Orozco Room, 66 West 12th Street
Open to staff, students, faculty, and alumni
Reservation required; readings will be assigned in advance
bellhooksfeminismtalksback.eventbrite.com

Are You Still a Slave? Liberating the Black Female Body
A public dialogue between bell hooks + Marci Blackman + Shola Lynch + Janet Mock
Tuesday, May 6, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
The Auditorium at 66 West 12th Street
Open to the public; admission free. Seating is first come, first served.

Join bell hooks and other leading voices in black feminism and LGBTQ - author Marci Blackman (Tradition), film director Shola Lynch (Free Angela and All Political Prisoners), and author and activist Janet Mock (Redefining Realness) in conversation about liberating the black female body.

This public dialogue will be livestreamed - new.livestream.com/TheNewSchool

How Do We Define Feminist Liberation? Listening to Black Female Voices
A public dialogue between bell hooks + Lisa Fischer + Kim Sykes
Wednesday, May 7, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Tishman Auditorium, 63 Fifth Avenue
Open to the public; admission free. Seating is first come, first served.

Join bell hooks in conversation with R&B singer Lisa Fischer (20 Feet From Stardom) and actress Kim Sykes (Pariah) about celebrating black female power.

This public dialogue will be livestreamed - new.livestream.com/TheNewSchool

Fall 2013 Residency: Public Events, November 4–8, 2013

Monday, November 4

Talking Teaching
A general seminar for faculty
Wollman Hall, 65 West 11th Street, 2:00-3:30 p.m.

Tuesday, November 5

Talking Race: Left and Right
A New School dialogue
Wollman Hall, 65 West 11th Street, 12:00-2:00 p.m.
Open to students, faculty, and staff

Join bell hooks, dean Stephanie Browner of Eugene Lang College, and others for an informal and searching conversation about race at Lang and The New School generally.

Beyond the Body?
bell hooks in conversation with Eve Ensler
Tishman Auditorium, 66 West 12th Street, 5:00-6:30 p.m.
Open to the public; admission free. Seating is first come, first served.

Join bell hooks and Eve Ensler, the Tony Award-winning playwright (The Vagina Monologues), performer, and activist, for a conversation about gender and lived bodies, spirituality, and feminism.

Friday, November 8

Feminism Forever: Theory and Practice
An undergraduate master class
Hirshon Suite, 55 West 13th Street, 12:30-2:30 p.m.

Black Female Voices: Who Is Listening?
bell hooks in conversation with Melissa Harris-Perry
Tishman Auditorium, 66 West 12th Street, 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Open to the public; admission free. Seating is first come, first served.

Join bell hooks and Melissa Harris-Perry, founding director of the Anna Julia Cooper Project on Gender, Race, and Politics in the South, for a conversation about race, black womanhood, politics, media, and love. Harris-Perry is a professor of political science at Tulane University, an author, and the host of MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry.

Join the conversation at #bellhooksTNS

 
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