von Mahs, Robert

Jürgen von Mahs

Robert von Mahs
PhD, Sociology and Social Policy, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
Assistant Professor; Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts

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Areas of Expertise:
Urban policy, homelessness, social control and the criminalization of the poor
Profile:
Jürgen von Mahs is assistant professor in urban studies at The New School and holds a joint appointment in the Urban Studies Program at Eugene Lang College and the Department of Social Sciences at The New School for General Studies. His research and teaching interests include poverty and homelessness, comparative social policy analysis, globalization processes, social control and the criminalization of the poor, and social movements, as well as ethnographic and life course research. His research has been supported by grants from the German Marshall Fund, the Friedrich Ebert Foundation, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, and the Fulbright Commission. Before coming to the New School, he taught at Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia
Courses Taught:
  • Urban Homelessness: Power, Space, and Time
  • Global Cities in Perspective: Berlin
  • Welcome to America? Immigration and Immigration Policy
  • Urban Studies Speaker Series: Global New York
  • Urban Toolbox: Research Methods
  • Urban Spaces: Sociological Perspectives
  • Urban Problems, Urban Actions: First Year Advising Seminar
  • Homelessness and Public Policy in Post-Industrial Societies
  • Engaging Homelessness: Service Learning
  • Globalization, Economic Crisis, and the Welfare State
  • Urban Homelessness: Civic Engagement and Activism in the City
Recent Publications:
“The Socio-Spatial Exclusion of Homeless People in Germany and the United States,” American Behavioral Scientist (2005)

“Welfare State Restructuring and Homelessness in Germany and the United States,” Urban Geography (2001)


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